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EyeFi SD cards


janeez e2
6 1.2k 8 United Kingdom
4 Apr 2012 1:39AM
Just found out about these today and wondered if anyone had tried them out. Went into Jessops and typically they don't have them in stock and don't know how they work! If this is the way forward from tethering it sounds too good to be true! Anyone had any experience using them, how do they work and what sort of distance from the computer do you need to or can be? Sorry for a ton of questions but I'm not about to shell out nearly fifty quid for a 4 gig card without a bit of ground work beforehand! Smile Cheers all.

Jane

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bppowell 12 2.1k 2 England
4 Apr 2012 8:54AM
I use one at all the events we do.

My set up is not the recomended way and does not work with all DSLR's but works well with my Olympus E30. I have the 8GB pro card and a SDHC to CF adapter.

Some of the events we do last for 8 or more hours and I can take anthing up to a 1500 shots, I do not think I have ever lost one.

They should be used in cameras that use an SDHC card, that is what they are designed for..
janeez e2
6 1.2k 8 United Kingdom
4 Apr 2012 10:31AM
I know it will work with my Nikon and a 4gb would be enough for what I need it for although 8 would be better. Just wondered how well they work. Sounds like it could be a good investment.
ChrisTom 6 72 United Kingdom
4 Apr 2012 10:50AM
I might be missing the point of (wi fi) SD cards. I assume in addition to the cards you would also have to have some sort of radio receiver connected to your PC, with presumably software to support it.

At this time, I just remove card from camera, and plug card into SD slot on computer, job done, without a get deal of effort.

So I cant see why I would want to purchase (wi fi) SD cards which are a great deal more expensive, plus have to adapt my PC ?.

Sorry Jane, I have not answered your question, just posed another one.

Take care.
lemmy 7 2.0k United Kingdom
4 Apr 2012 11:26AM

Quote: If this is the way forward from tethering it sounds too good to be true!


It's nothing to do with tethering, just a way of transferring files from your camera to your computer. If you cannot take the card out of your camera and place it in your computer's card reader or you cannot plug the USB cable in to your camera and the computer to connect them, then the EyeFi card will do the trick.

They are very slow at transferring compared to card reading or USB speeds since tranfer is limited to the wifi network speed. Remember, you must be connected to a wifi network to transfer files. This greatly limits where you can use it, of course.

The best speed a modern wifi router will give, under ideal conditions, would be about 12.5 MBPS, though you'd never achieve this with the tiny antenna in the EyeFi. So, to transfer, under ideal theoretical conditions, 100 RAW files from my Panasonic GH2 (about 1.5GB) would take, with the fastest SD cards available, 17 seconds. Under similarly ideal conditions, the EyeFi card would require just over 2 minutes.

As the ad for them says, if you are fed up with hunting around for the USB connector cable or having to take the memory card out of your camera, the EyeFi is for you. Apart from specialist uses. they seem to me to be the answer to a problem most don't have.
janeez e2
6 1.2k 8 United Kingdom
4 Apr 2012 1:34PM
My use was for weddings. The idea being me off taking portraits, candids etc at the evening reception with it transferring straight to my colleagues laptop for editing and printing. Nothing we can't do now it was just that I thought it meant not having to run back and forth to the laptop. I may hang on to my money for a bit longer. Wink I also wondered at the WiFi connectivity. I assume we would need a dongle if there were no connections at the venue?
lemmy 7 2.0k United Kingdom
4 Apr 2012 2:03PM

Quote: I assume we would need a dongle if there were no connections at the venue?


No, you must have a wifi network. The card sends by radio signal.

The dongle connects your computer to the internet but the EyeFi cannot connect to the 'net without a router. So they cannot talk.

Canon do such a device, it fits under the camera like a battery pack but it costs £1,000 or so. A lot of money to save a short walk to the computer......Smile
janeez e2
6 1.2k 8 United Kingdom
4 Apr 2012 4:13PM
I'll get my walking boots on! Wink
patters 10 1.8k 1 United Kingdom
4 Apr 2012 9:47PM
I've just ordered one and its sitting at home, I think you can also do direct connect so you do not need a router, and you can set your camera up to be a host that your other devices link to. Also, alot of modern cameras have special support for cards like this so they do things like prevent power off until transfer is complete etc. This site also has a review here
lemmy 7 2.0k United Kingdom
4 Apr 2012 10:25PM
There is no way to connect directly to anything from the camera itself, as it says in the specs. You have to have a router and the card will store the passwords etc for 32 of them.

All it does is save you plugging in the cable or taking out the SD card and putting it into your computer's card reader.

You can't make a camera into a host. Where would it store the server software? But especially what possible value could it have? You might as well make your toaster into a host Grin
patters 10 1.8k 1 United Kingdom
5 Apr 2012 8:48AM
It can to direct connect to iPad or laptop, and if the camera was a host you would be able to ftp from it
bppowell 12 2.1k 2 England
5 Apr 2012 8:53AM
With the pro card you do not need a router if the laptop/PC has a wireless card you can do an Ad Hoc connection right to it.

Saying that I have found it easier and more reliable to use a router.

You only need an internet connection to add a network to the card and do the initial settings, once this is done you do not need a wireless network.

I have the wireless on my laptop turned off and hardwire the laptop to the router and I have no speed issues transferring from camera to laptop, even if I shoot RAW. At events I shoot jpg fine and it takes from 3 to 7 seconds for each shot to reach the laptop.

Using wireless transfer gives you real freedom in how you set up and work. It also eliminates trip hazard by removing trailing cables. I have taken shoots up 100M away from the laptop and they have still arrived safely.

I would buy it and try, if it does not work for you there is always ebay, the cards tend to hold their value.

Barry
patters 10 1.8k 1 United Kingdom
5 Apr 2012 8:54AM

Quote:Direct Mode offers the flexibility of anywhere. After a quick set up, take photos wherever you are – then when you’re ready to transfer, just turn your camera on and let Eye-Fi do the rest. The Eye-Fi X2 card will create its own Wi-Fi network and transfer to the free iPhone/iPad or Android app. No matter where you are, you’ll get your photos and videos on your device in no time./quote]

Its OK Lemmy, apology accepted Smile

lemmy 7 2.0k United Kingdom
5 Apr 2012 12:32PM
Yes, that's a newer development so...sorry Smile

So you can upload pictures directly to your computer wherever you are? I can see a purpose for it in that case other than a slow and expensive replacement for a cable. I wouldn't see any purpose in general in sending pictures to my iPad since it has no worthwhile editing capability.

But if it means I can be out on location in Brighton, say, and with this card in my camera, send all my pictures to my computer in London. That does justify the price - I think I might buy one!

Quote:I wouldn't see any purpose in general in sending pictures to my iPad

Bigger screen for reviewing shots?

From some of your comments I think you miss the main point of these devices. It's nothing really to do with saving putting cards into computers, these kind of systems are great for use in studios or other situations where the photographer can shoot products or models and the results come up on a big screen instead of just the LCD on the camera's reverse.

Quote:
The dongle connects your computer to the internet but the EyeFi cannot connect to the 'net without a router. So they cannot talk.



I've no idea why you mention the internet. It's not a requirement.

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