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User_Removed
5 Jan 2012 - 4:14 PM


Quote: The item was in a mag I read whilst at my dentists a few weeks ago it was an Australian mag not seen it before or since the article did go on to say that the item was sent to Nikon by I believe the Australian Police and that there was an investigation under way.

LOL. I had a feeling you'd not have a link.

I'm not convinced

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5 Jan 2012 - 4:14 PM

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NEWDIGIT
NEWDIGIT  3401 forum posts United Kingdom
6 Jan 2012 - 9:20 AM

NEWMANP
missing serial numbers would raise concerns with me.
Does anyone know if Nikon put serial numbers on all there equipment regardless of where it is intended to be sold?

Overread
Overread  63746 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
6 Jan 2012 - 10:48 AM

I recall reading a thread somewhere (I think it might even have been EPZ but I honestly can't be certain) where someone was having problems with a "fake" lens they had bought. I think the thing is that some repair shops/official departments will run the serial number on a lens and if the lens hasn't been imported into the country by the normal method the lens isn't added to their database. As a result the lens, which is in all ways legitimatly built, is flagged as fake because its serial isn't listed as being imported into the country.

This, of course, tends to only appear with Grey Imports, though most online shops should list (somewhere) that the product you are purchasing is a grey import.

It also appears to be a bit random, since reports of "fake" lenses from this are very rare rather than the norm so it might reflect that some grey import stocks skip a step overseas where their serials are registered to the databases.



Like others I'd be surprised of a scam building a full working lens when it would just be simpler to scam the payment itself; that said there are plenty of scammers willing to swap own brand items for cheaper 3rd party ones.

KevSB
KevSB  101405 forum posts United Kingdom5 Constructive Critique Points
6 Jan 2012 - 11:13 AM


Quote: I recall reading a thread somewhere (I think it might even have been EPZ but I honestly can't be certain) where someone was having problems with a "fake" lens they had bought. I think the thing is that some repair shops/official departments will run the serial number on a lens and if the lens hasn't been imported into the country by the normal method the lens isn't added to their database. As a result the lens, which is in all ways legitimatly built, is flagged as fake because its serial isn't listed as being imported into the country.

This, of course, tends to only appear with Grey Imports, though most online shops should list (somewhere) that the product you are purchasing is a grey import.

It also appears to be a bit random, since reports of "fake" lenses from this are very rare rather than the norm so it might reflect that some grey import stocks skip a step overseas where their serials are registered to the databases.



Like others I'd be surprised of a scam building a full working lens when it would just be simpler to scam the payment itself; that said there are plenty of scammers willing to swap own brand items for cheaper 3rd party ones.

You did, I remember it was from someone who had Bought it from Uk supplier and when he took it for repair was told it was a fake, Unfortunetly I cannot remeber the op or title.

Railcam
Railcam  7465 forum posts Scotland
6 Jan 2012 - 11:43 AM

Was it not a "fake" Canon 7D body rather than a lens? The repairer could not find the serial number on a database and therefore pronounced it a fake or something like that.

Sorry if this is wrong. My memory gets more vague by the day Smile

KevSB
KevSB  101405 forum posts United Kingdom5 Constructive Critique Points
6 Jan 2012 - 11:50 AM


Quote: Was it not a "fake" Canon 7D body rather than a lens? The repairer could not find the serial number on a database and therefore pronounced it a fake or something like that.

Sorry if this is wrong. My memory gets more vague by the day Smile

You may well be right, Mine gets more vague marked each day by the more grey hairs I Have


In the end SE stumped up 400 quid to bury the matter as the thread below shows

Last Modified By KevSB at 6 Jan 2012 - 11:54 AM
answersonapostcard
answersonapostcard Site Moderator 1012554 forum postsanswersonapostcard vcard United Kingdom15 Constructive Critique Points
6 Jan 2012 - 11:50 AM

http://www.ephotozine.com/forums/topic/canon-counterfeit-camera-90917

NEWMANP
NEWMANP e2 Member 61583 forum postsNEWMANP vcard United Kingdom574 Constructive Critique Points
6 Jan 2012 - 11:54 AM

to my engineering mind, i cant see how it could be practical to set up a manufacturing line with the intent of producing a relatively small batch quantity of lenses which are externally accurate in detail and comparible in quality to a Nikon / nikkor Lens. ok the optical elements alone to produce a low quality lens would be expensive enough without the volume.

the only way this might have the opportunity to happen is when certain manufacturers are subcontracted to make budget kit lenses specifically for premium brand manufacturers. to do so they would have to have shady side deals which would be most unlikely due to the implecations contracturaly if they were caught doing so. whether employees have a side line is a different matter.

i am sure that 3rd party maunufacturers make the lower band budget lenses for Nikon and i suppose Canon and others, Tamron certainly have a subcontract division to do this work but its unbelievable that a company with such a long standing reputation as a quality optical manufacturer would do anything but honour contractural obligations and it would be beyond belief that they would breach copyrights.

so unless there is a brilliant technician in a shed selling lenses that cost more to make than he gets on ebay, i think it must be more to do with grey imports than fake copy lenses.

i have definately seen a 12-24 nikkor without a serial number. and it looked just like mine.


Phil

Last Modified By NEWMANP at 6 Jan 2012 - 11:56 AM
thewilliam
6 Jan 2012 - 12:44 PM

In the good old days, serial numbers were always written in large, clear characters and in a prominent place on the equipment. On some of my newer Nikon kit, I've had to hunt for the number when registering the kit with NPS.

Many of the cheaper Nikon lenses are indeed made by other companies such as Cosina who currently make for Zeiss, so no problem here. But I'd be very surprised if reputable subcontractors were selling the lenses through the back door.

The fake lenses that I've heard about were real cheapies that had been given front rings that carried a famous name. Some were even in the boxes that the punters would expect.

The remedy is simple - buy from a reputable dealer using a credit-card or from an eBay seller who has good feedback and takes Paypal. That way we have a remedy.

rhol2
rhol2 e2 Member 3282 forum postsrhol2 vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
8 Jan 2012 - 10:38 AM

I agree with " thewilliam", don't be greedy, pay a fair price at a reputable dealer.

I know people who scoff at this and boast about buying at "cheapo" prices. They forget that cheap can be nasty!

User_Removed
8 Jan 2012 - 11:20 AM

Phil, I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks the story of counterfeit lenses doesn't ring true. Grey imports yes, not 'Genuine UK Stock' yes - but actual working replicas, no way the market is too small and they couldn't produce fakes that cheaply, if they could they may as well brand them as third party and go into competition like Sigma, Tamron etc

LenShepherd
LenShepherd e2 Member 62437 forum postsLenShepherd vcard United Kingdom
8 Jan 2012 - 11:57 AM


Quote: Ii have seen a grey import Nikkor 12-24 lens that was bought on e bay in original box that had no serial number

Phil

Did you look very carefully?
The serial number is very faintly marked near the lens mount under the words "Made in Japan" - and easily missed.
All Nikon lenses seem to leave the factory with a serial number on them - the only likely reason for a Nikon lens not having a serial number is it has been removed - and may well be stolen property Sad

thewilliam
8 Jan 2012 - 2:18 PM

Len is right that the serial number can be faint. Once I find the number, I write it out on Dymo tape and stick it to the lens barrel. Makes stock-keeping much easier!

The cost of modern camera equipment seems to depend primarily on the size of the production run, which is why the 50mm f1.8 and 18-55 zooms have such low prices yet deliver such good images.

annettep38
annettep38 e2 Member 3186 forum postsannettep38 vcard France30 Constructive Critique Points
18 Jan 2012 - 12:00 PM

IMHO Nikon sells some 'made in China' lenses that look f@ke to me and should never have been branded Nikon. I owned once a 70-300 G something Nikkor tele zoom, was definitely sold as a kit lens in France and it is absolutely useless. You can recognise it by a wobbly plastic focussing ring far away from the camera. My 18-55 has the same manufacturing 'quality' so I have replaced it...

Now can you blame the Chinese for making copies of that stuff? I can't. Nikon's own fault for manufacturing it in China - a country where they pretend to pay the workers who pretend to work.
It is the same with car manufacturers, they moan about ' aftermarket' parts, sell their stuff with a 'made in FRANCE' by LAND ROVER label and inside it is made in China. I can prove that.
Frankly, I prefer to buy and sell TRW, Delphi etc.
Getting back to Nikon, Look at Ken Rockwells web site, the 10 worst ever lenses... you'll see I'm not the only one.

Moral of the story: try before you buy. Which means go to a shop or buy second hand here or any other place you trust. I have over the years acquired some fantastic Nikkors or Tamrons via ebay or other market places and always asked for sample photos and a phone number. I'm still in contact with a Slovenian enthusiast who sold the 500mm to me. Better than buying cheap new stuff from someone very far away without any background.

Last Modified By annettep38 at 18 Jan 2012 - 12:01 PM
kodachrome
18 Jan 2012 - 4:48 PM

Many years ago [i'm sure it still goes on] Europe was flooded with fake Rolex watches, made in Hong Kong. In the end they got so good that they were hard to ID from the real thing.

Do your research before you buy on line.

Pete

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