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GlennH
GlennH  91918 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 11:32 AM

In a similar vein:


Quote: If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

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29 Jul 2013 - 11:32 AM

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lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1014128 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 11:57 AM


Quote: The only reply is - 'well go right ahead then, no-one is stopping you'.

Yes they are - the bloke in the loo was quite upset when I tried to recreate that shot.

Last Modified By lobsterboy at 29 Jul 2013 - 12:05 PM
keith selmes
29 Jul 2013 - 12:08 PM

I've been very impressed by the work of Endre Friedmann, which is widely published, although not many have heard of him.

When I read his book, I was surprised that I recognised many of the illustrations. I'd been seeing them for years, and they were a background in my knowledge and understanding of the world in which I grew up, but I never knew who took them, nor realised how many were taken by that one person.

Reading the introduction to the book I wonder if I ever would have seen them, if he hadn't changed his name and become Robert Capa.

It says in the spring of 1936, faced with a dire scarcity of sales, he and his girlfriend "decided to invent a glamorous and successful American photographer named Robert Capa", and she then sold his work on the strength of doing editors a favour by getting them Capa's work. And it worked, and Endre Friedmann became Robert Capa and became famous.
The girl changed her own name too, from the mouthful of Gerda Pohorylle to the more catchy Gerda Taro, and became a successful photographer in her own right, until her early death in the Spanish civil war.

None of which should downgrade their work, and it's possibly more to do with marketing than fame, but it struck me as relevant to the thread.

P.S. probably not quite what SteveCharles meant by "you could make a name for yourself", but that is just what they did.

SteveCharles
29 Jul 2013 - 12:33 PM

I did exactly the same. Charles is my middle name, my surname is actually Smith, and look at all the success it's brought me Wink

keithh
keithh e2 Member 1022911 forum postskeithh vcard Wallis and Futuna31 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 8:24 PM

It must have worked.....I've never heard of Steve Smith.

Nick_w
Nick_w e2 Member 73852 forum postsNick_w vcard England99 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 8:35 PM


Quote: It must have worked.....I've never heard of Steve Smith.

..bats #6 for Australia Wink

keithh
keithh e2 Member 1022911 forum postskeithh vcard Wallis and Futuna31 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 8:50 PM

I would have said the fictional son of Stan in American Dad. Wink

Both however are apparently crap with a camera....as opposed to Steve Charles who is not bad with a camera. Wink

Nick_w
Nick_w e2 Member 73852 forum postsNick_w vcard England99 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 9:01 PM


Quote: Bresson really invented modern photo-journalism as we know it. This is a man who, when he was sent to cover the coronation of George VI, took photos of the crowds and totally ignored the new king.

As a kid I hated history with a passion, I couldn't understand the fervour around the comings and goings of one (admittedly important) family. To me it is the general population that's Important, it was only when I started to learn about WW1 that the average working class family was portrayed in the history books. What's this to do with photography? Well without the likes or Cartier Bresson we wouldn't see anything about the average person. True photojournalism is a forgotten art lost in technology.

The first image I remember was a pretty graphic one by Eddie Adams, an image that set him up for life, one he regretted taking - one that created a good friend (the "executioner"). Trouble is seeing it with 21st centuary technology we forget such images were taken with film cameras in hostile circumstances, no 10 fps, no auto everything, no meter (or very primitive) - how many now would criticise him for blown highlights etc, To me it's still one of the best photos ever taken.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315208 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 9:29 PM

I wonder how many of these photographers were remembered.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/gallery/2013/may/06/met-museum-new-york-a...
http://www.civil-war.net/cw_images/

JackAllTog
JackAllTog e2 Member 53584 forum postsJackAllTog vcard United Kingdom58 Constructive Critique Points
30 Jul 2013 - 12:51 PM

I know as I learn more about photography that I also learn to appreciate things I never used to notice in a photo before - so sometime a photo is truly better than another but it takes a trained eye to see it.

Also many famous photographer may have binned thousands of other images to quality control the ones released - so the remaining ones are often the best examples of their work.

But yes some waxing lyrical does sometimes just seem pompous from time to time.

GlennH
GlennH  91918 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
30 Jul 2013 - 1:22 PM


Quote: Also many famous photographer may have binned thousands of other images to quality control the ones released - so the remaining ones are often the best examples of their work.

Well yes, that's what makes it so absurd for casual snappers such as most of us to pitch stones at their work. I'd suggest most 'famous' photographers got where they are through hard graft and a brutal objectivity that doesn't really exist amongst hobbyists. I recall David Bailey saying at one point that he reckoned on 6 decent pictures a year, whereas other camera-wielding mortals seem to believe every other picture they take is a deserved competition winner.

ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade e2 Member 1014794 forum postsade_mcfade vcard England216 Constructive Critique Points
30 Jul 2013 - 1:37 PM

ask any designer and they'll tell you photographers are the WORST judges of their own images Wink

GlennH
GlennH  91918 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
30 Jul 2013 - 1:42 PM


Quote: Ask any designer and they'll tell you photographers are the WORST judges of their own images Wink

I'd suggest that's a generalisation - the best photographers are more likely to be decent editors. Tons of photographers have a glass half full approach - they don't cast a particularly critical eye.

thewilliam
30 Jul 2013 - 1:46 PM

Eamonn McCabe is a brilliant photographer and just as good when he was Picture Editor at the Grauniad!

Andyphotography


Quote: Also many famous photographer may have binned thousands of other images to quality control the ones released - so the remaining ones are often the best examples of their work.

Well yes, that's what makes it so absurd for casual snappers such as most of us to pitch stones at their work. I'd suggest most 'famous' photographers got where they are through hard graft and a brutal objectivity that doesn't really exist amongst hobbyists. I recall David Bailey saying at one point that he reckoned on 6 decent pictures a year, whereas other camera-wielding mortals seem to believe every other picture they take is a deserved competition winner.

Im lucky If I get maybe a dozen images a year that I am happy withGrin

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