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Feeling a failure when client goes elsewhere


puertouk 3 1.1k 17 United Kingdom
24 Feb 2013 11:34AM
You will get a lot more setbacks, especially dealing with people. Most probably what's happened is, the people at the bridal shop have told her she can get a better deal and photographer who they deal with all the time. She's obviously been swayed by what they have told her and booked this guy, who is most probably a right nerd. Unfortunately these things happen, so don't let it worry you. Some people cannot see the wood for the trees. Just forget about it and find your next client. Did you happen to see the programme on TV the Fixer, with Alex Polizzi? She had a mother and 3 daughters who ran a photography business. My god, the daughters were a nightmare. You think you have problems! There were some really good lessons to be learned and she gave them some good pointers on how to improve their business.

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Graysta 9 1.1k England
24 Feb 2013 12:52PM

Quote: I'm glad I'm not shooting it 'cos I think she could turn out to be a nightmare.


That's the way to look at it. and if it means anything looking at your P/F it's not that you could not do it, there's some nice work in there. It's Her loss.
CaptivePhotons 11 1.6k 2 England
24 Feb 2013 2:47PM

Quote:a mother and 3 daughters who ran a photography business. My god, the daughters were a nightmare.


Perhaps you ought to read This thread before you voice your opinion on a one sided story.
arhb e2
7 2.4k 68 United Kingdom
25 Feb 2013 12:46AM

Quote:a mother and 3 daughters who ran a photography business. My god, the daughters were a nightmare.

Perhaps you ought to read This thread before you voice your opinion on a one sided story.



Totally agree.
A great example of how BBC programmes are being produced in a distorted view of what is actually happening, and how viewers are quick to assume what is being televised is the truth.
Sus 10 3.2k 9 England
25 Feb 2013 1:09AM
No idea what your prices are, but you are definitely good enough. Their loss, and I bet that they will look back and wish they had booked you. Some clients are 'difficult' - that's them, not you. Keep moving with the clients that value your work!
thewilliam 6 4.7k
25 Feb 2013 10:11AM
FFS! no contractor of any kind will win every job that he/she pitches for!

We need to be tough enough to bounce back for the next prospect. I'd get worried if I failed to get any job!
keithh e2
10 23.2k 33 Wallis And Futuna
25 Feb 2013 10:40AM
Morning.
collywobles 10 3.3k 9 United Kingdom
25 Feb 2013 10:49AM
I can see a counselling session coming on.................
mikehit e2
5 6.8k 11 United Kingdom
25 Feb 2013 10:54AM
Closing sales is one of the hardest tasks but is the most important, and some of the oldest sales tricks in the book play on peoples' natural unwillingness to say 'no'. There are many differences in her relationship with you versus the stand at the exhibition, among them being territory in that you visited her place, she visited theirs; maybe she was window shopping with you, but her mind was mor towards buying when she went to the exhibition; when you visited her the relationship had already been set with emails, when she visited them they had the chance to mould the relationship. Top salesmen know how to read the situation and push buttons to get that 'yes'.
In all walks of life you will see people with inferior products (not necessarily bad) doing better business than people selling better products and it all comes down to closing that sale.
peterjones 12 4.0k 1 United Kingdom
25 Feb 2013 2:25PM
One of the difficulties in selling your photographic services is that your clients are not photographers, camera club judges or epz members and therefore will view you and your work in a totally different vein to your peers; if you can find whatever "hot button" that turns them on all may be well however you may be too tall, short, fat, thin, too well spoken, not well spoken, too young, too old etc etc etc there are a whole raft of totally illogical reasons why a prospect may turn you down; the greatest salesman in the world won't win them all. Remember human nature doesn't judge us on all the 100's of things we get right it judges us on the one thing that we get wrong. E.g. you take 999 brilliant images at a wedding, your clients will judge you on the one you got wrong or missed out.

Your portfolio may win exhibitions; your colleagues may fall over themselves in fawning, abject praise and worship of your work but if your prospective clients don't like them you won't get them.

Peter.
Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
25 Feb 2013 2:36PM
Superb post, Peter! Grin
mikehit e2
5 6.8k 11 United Kingdom
25 Feb 2013 2:48PM

Quote:the greatest salesman in the world won't win them all.

LOL! When I worked for my Dad, his sales 101 included the instruction that if he found one of his reps visited the same person more than 3 times in a year without a sale they could be in trouble because it was clear the potential client just did not like the rep so you were never going to get the sale. The reason may be illogical and emotional ("...too tall, short, fat, thin, too well spoken, not well spoken, too young, too old etc etc etc ...") but why waste time so look elsewhere.
ColinEJ 8 21 17 United Kingdom
25 Feb 2013 5:03PM
I had a very long time doing advertising and publicity photography and even though I always tried to exceed their expectations and go the extra mile, I still lost clients. Thankfully, I also gained a lot. The trick is to have a varied portfolio of clients, from different areas so that whatever sector may be suffering at any given time, it doesn't have a significant effect on your overall business.

Clients are always right, often owe no loyalty and certainly don't owe an explanation why they don't use you. It may not even be their decision, their MD or FD may have a friend etc.etc. Another TOG may come in and undercut you big time and in these times, cost is a big incentive. The only thing you can do is assure them that if it doesn't work out for whatever reason, you would welcome the opportunity to work with them in the future.

Reading between the lines, commissions may have played a part in your customers decision. I am aware that many bridal shops, florists, hotels etc. are on commissions for referrals to specific photographers. Being quite a useful addition to their own income, they can be quite persuasive in guiding the bride towards their preferred photographer. And however guilty the bride may, or may not be after the event, she probably signed the booking form at their premises. A booking fee to reserve your services for their wedding day would have psychologically locked them in to your services and tend to counter any persuasion from interested third parties.

Not a case of not being good enough, just another TOG with a better business gathering technique.

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