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Film Cameras for Photography Alevels


anpix e2
6 88 United Kingdom
17 May 2008 7:31AM
Hi i am in year 9 but i know that when i go to collage i will want to take photography you need a 35mm camera do you have any suggestions?
Andrew

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Geoffphoto e2
8 13.5k United Kingdom
17 May 2008 8:21AM
Digital or film, Andrew ? If you want to get a decent 35mm film camera then you won't go far wrong with a Nikon FM2, superb build quality and tough as old boots.


BTW it's college Smile
pepperst e2
7 2.3k 4 Wales
17 May 2008 9:16AM
Yeah these modern day collages are all over the place!

If they give you a choice andy, go for film as you'll learn a lot more through it than digital. I think there are quite a few threads on here about what cameras to get for college.

Id try and get an older camera with a prime lens where you have to do all the work (ie: no auto settings), that way you'll pick up even more about appeture and using you feet to zoom.

Peps
cameraman e2
11 227 1 England
17 May 2008 11:11AM

Quote:go for film as you'll learn a lot more through it than digital

How do you work that out???
Mjhearne e2
8 432 4 Scotland
17 May 2008 11:14AM
Im at college just now doing a HND and we have only spent 3 weeks in the dark room. The rest of the 2 years is based on digital. I think darkroom has become something of the past as far as college goes. Its a shame as darkroom is good, but if digital is going to be a big part of your course, id suggest a 400D. Its done me ok!
pepperst e2
7 2.3k 4 Wales
17 May 2008 11:30AM
Our A-level and ND course's are geared towards film still. Most the big uni's still have darkrooms and the students use film over digital in a lot of cases.


Quote:Quote:go for film as you'll learn a lot more through it than digitalHow do you work that out???


Digital allows you to shoot 200 pictures and sort it out on the computer, for a newbie this will create a great 'designer'. With film you have to think before shooting as you only have a certain amount of shots to play with, often based on cost, if I can only afford two films then I have to plan and think more about what I do rather than shooting everything and hope for the best.

If I then take out the digi then I find I use the same principles as I would film and get better results from it.

Anyway its best if you contact the college and speak to them first, that way you can make an informed decision.

Good luck

Peps
User_Removed 11 455 13 United Kingdom
17 May 2008 11:35AM
Some college courses do still require a film camera, but as you've got at least a couple of years before you go to college you could go digital now and pick up a relatively cheap film camera if it's needed for the course.

If you don't have access to a darkroom or high quality film scanning equipment you might be limited in using film - and whilst a decent digital SLR will cost a fair bit start with you don't have to worry about film and developing costs (providing you have access to decent computer equipment).

The right decision will depend on your budget and situation.

Brett
NickParry e2
9 1.0k 79 Wales
17 May 2008 12:35PM
Having taught both A-Level and AS photography, the course still needs students to have a good understanding of both darkroom practises and using film cameras. This is invaluable to gaining a knowledge of how photography works.

The course also covers using digital cameras, and using software such as photoshop.

The units of work are based around themes, and at AS level you would do 2 units of work on 2 different themes (such as portraiture and still life), and an exam which had several themes you could choose one of, and do an exam unit of work. The A-Level required one unit of work and a written disertation, plus a final exam.

If you decide to do photography in school or college, I highly recommend that you get a film camera, and learn how to use all the settings properly. You can also get a digital camera and some software, and start exploring the digital processes too.

Nick
cameraman e2
11 227 1 England
17 May 2008 12:36PM

Quote:Digital allows you to shoot 200 pictures and sort it out on the computer



Quote:rather than shooting everything and hope for the best


Both are very bad practice and should be avoided. Just because a digital camera is used, it does not mean that you don't have to use your brain. Of course, this applies to any auto camera features, whether film or digital. The only real difference between the two types of camera is the way the image is recorded.
NickParry e2
9 1.0k 79 Wales
17 May 2008 12:44PM

Quote:Having taught both A-Level and AS photography, the course still needs students to have a good understanding of both darkroom practises and using film cameras. This is invaluable to gaining a knowledge of how photography works.

The course also covers using digital cameras, and using software such as photoshop.

The units of work are based around themes, and at AS level you would do 2 units of work on 2 different themes (such as portraiture and still life), and an exam which had several themes you could choose one of, and do an exam unit of work. The A-Level required one unit of work and a written disertation, plus a final exam.

If you decide to do photography in school or college, I highly recommend that you get a film camera, and learn how to use all the settings properly. You can also get a digital camera and some software, and start exploring the digital processes too.

Nick



Further to this I would recommend that you get cameras that are by the same manufacturer where you can use the film camera and digital camera with the same lenses.
mark_delta e2
7 1.3k
17 May 2008 12:47PM
Personally I think the decision to stop using glass plates was a mistake.
Some schools, colleges and university's need a good shake up and need to be dragged kicking and screaming in to the 21st century !

Why waste time teach someone something they may never ever use, it's a digital age and to those who say learning film will teach you the basics, nonsense, it will teach you that correct exposure on film is a doddle and easy to correct on a negative as latitude is enormous on modern film as much as 4 stops where as on digital its a nightmare, 1 stop either way and its a non starter.

Want my advice, if its a job in photography you want find a college that does a modern digital course and leave film to the history enthusiasts.
If its to learn about past historic methods, do the film course.
keith selmes
11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
17 May 2008 12:52PM
Perhaps the truth lies between the two poles. With a digital camera you feel more freedom to experiment, so you may think that something won't work, but give it a go anyway. Sometimes it does work, so you've learned something. If you're trying something new, that seems quite reasonable to me, as you don't start out knowing in advance how it will turn out. When you've gained some knowledge in that field, you can be more selective at the taking stage.
pepperst e2
7 2.3k 4 Wales
17 May 2008 12:59PM

Quote:Both are very bad practice and should be avoided. Just because a digital camera is used, it does not mean that you don't have to use your brain.


This is kind of what I meant, its just easier to get into this mind set if you go straight into digital which costs less in the long term. If it costs you money to shoot then you'll think first and thus continuing using your brain when you move onto digital, only saying this is the method that worked for me and many others ( including several pros)

It is possible to teach both side by side Mark, maybe it should be down to the actual professional which method they use having been exposed to various options.
joolsb e2
10 27.1k 38 Switzerland
17 May 2008 1:01PM

Quote:Why waste time teach someone something they may never ever use,


Absolutely! Let's stop teaching music, physics, chemistry, biology and traditional art while we're at it! In fact, English and basic maths is all most people ever need. And English is debatable. Who cares about the rest!

Courses teach film because that, like it or not, is how the vast majority of photographic images in existence were recorded. You wouldn't expect an art course not to teach pupils how to sketch in charcoal or paint in watercolour, would you?
mark_delta e2
7 1.3k
17 May 2008 1:05PM

Quote:maybe it should be down to the actual professional which method they use having been exposed to various options.


Like I say it depends if its a career in photography or history you require .
I deal with well over 200 picture desks in a sales capacity daily and guess how many will except a film or negative for publication
1 a photography magazine !


Quote:You wouldn't expect an art course not to teach pupils how to sketch in charcoal or paint in watercolour, would you?

They still sell traditional art to the mainstream in bulk ??

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