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mikesavage
mikesavage  12243 forum posts England2 Constructive Critique Points
14 Oct 2013 - 1:35 AM

Well, after 10 years of shooting on a variety of digital zoom compacts/bridge cameras, I finally decided to make a bid for altogether higher image quality. I came back from that well-known photographic retailer, Argos Wink, clutching a Panasonic G3 c/w 14-42mm zoom lens, for the not-too-princely sum of 240.

If anybody has any advice about the pros/cons of using this camera I'd appreciate a quick heads-up; also a recommendation for a macro lens would be of interest.

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14 Oct 2013 - 1:35 AM

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sparrowhawk
sparrowhawk e2 Member 5268 forum postssparrowhawk vcard United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
14 Oct 2013 - 7:26 AM

have fun i have a g5 they are all great cameras in my opion

Stephen_w3d
14 Oct 2013 - 8:49 AM

One of the beauties of compact system cameras is the wealth of legacy lenses that csn be used with adapters. Have a look on ebay

Richardjwills
16 Oct 2013 - 12:10 PM

Well done, I have a G3 as well and they are pretty good. I have kinda moved away from the standard kit zoom though and tend to use the Panny 14mm and 20mm and the sigma 30mm which I picked up second hand. They all produce good quality pictures. The only con I can think of is the price of buying additional lenses, which can be rather expensive, so I tend to look to the second hand market. I would get used to using the kit zoom for now until such time as you outgrow it, I have noticed that Panasonic have now launched a new version of the 14-42mm kit lens, whether it might be worth an upgrade at a later date is open to debate.

Although I have used some old Minolta manual lenses with an adaptor, they do slow you down a bit as you can only focus manually, not much good for a quick snapshot unless you get lucky with your zone focussing.

mikesavage
mikesavage  12243 forum posts England2 Constructive Critique Points
17 Oct 2013 - 12:06 AM

Thanks for that Richard! Yes, I'm finding the standard zoom caters for most of my requirements. I'd particularly like a macro lens but they're not cheap, even second-hand ones.

mikesavage
mikesavage  12243 forum posts England2 Constructive Critique Points
20 Oct 2013 - 12:33 AM

I've added a Panasonic 45-200m, 1:4-5.6 OIS zoom to my collection, 189 second-hand.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315486 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
20 Oct 2013 - 8:41 PM

A great little lens is the Pany 14mm, the showing up on Amazon at low prices.

StrayCat
StrayCat e2 Member 1014859 forum postsStrayCat vcard Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
20 Oct 2013 - 9:00 PM

I like the look of that Sigma 60mm f2.8 for the price.

Last Modified By StrayCat at 20 Oct 2013 - 9:00 PM
Richardjwills
21 Oct 2013 - 8:49 AM

I have the Sigma 30mm and I am very pleased with it, 60mm definately on the list!

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315486 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
22 Oct 2013 - 8:49 PM

I find the 30mm a bit of an odd length on M4/3, its a little to long to use as a standard lens and too short to use as a telephoto.

There 19mm is handy though.

Richardjwills
23 Oct 2013 - 8:36 AM

I have just noticed that on MPB Photographic's site you can pick up a Panny 14mm lens for under 100..bargain if you are in the market for one!

mikehit
mikehit  56545 forum posts United Kingdom10 Constructive Critique Points
23 Oct 2013 - 9:16 AM

'Macro' can mean different things to different people: 'True' macro is where the object is life-size on the sensor which would mean, for example, a small beetle filling the whole sensor area - but commonly nowadays people use 'macro' to mean 'close up' - for example a whole butterfly filling the sensor area. So if you mean the latter then something like 45-200 or 70-300 may do you in most circumstances because you do not need to stand 12" from the subject, and cropping can do the rest if necessary.

For a true macro lens, the Panasonic 45mm macro is not a cheap lens and one alternative is the Olympus 60mm macro is up to 200 cheaper but does not have image stabilisation (Olympus build IS into their bodies, not the lenses), but if your preferred subjects are relatively stationary, you can probably use a tripod instead.

mikesavage
mikesavage  12243 forum posts England2 Constructive Critique Points
24 Oct 2013 - 4:32 AM

Thanks for that Mikehit. Yes, I don't really require true 1:1 macro most of the time. I've yet to get out & try the 45-200mm that I bought. I've discovered a Jessops +2 close-up lens in my collection of bits & bobs, with a 52mm filter thread, so I may put that on the 14-42mm zoom and see what result that produces.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315486 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
24 Oct 2013 - 7:24 PM

I believe Amazon sell quite a nice set of macro tubes, very cheap considering these have electronic contacts to control the lenses.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315486 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
24 Oct 2013 - 11:54 PM

Here you go.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/FOTGA-Macro-Extension-Thirds-Camera/dp/B00CANGBIK

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