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First SLR?


Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
31 Dec 2012 6:07PM

Quote:Newer m4/3 models are good cameras too - although personally I would steer away from any that use the older 12mp sensor which is fairly noisy at relatively modest ISOs. The 16mp one used in all newer models gives more resolution and better low-light performance. The outgoing models look like great value - they're OK if you've always got good light to deal with


Have you used any of these 12 mp sensors Chris, there not as bad as you make out, there very useful up to modest ISO`s, sure there not as good as the most up to date sensors, and this goes for all camera`s.


Quote:Decent 4/3 with interchangeable lenses is mainly more than twice this price level


Only a very few are, the high grade lenses like the Pany 12-35 or 35-100 cost a least half that of there Canon counterparts, swings and roundabouts, but if your building up a high grade system the savings come in more than just weight.

Example

Canon http://www.wexphotographic.com/buy-canon-ef-24-70mm-f2-8l-ii-usm-lens/p1529492

Panasonic http://www.wexphotographic.com/buy-panasonic-12-35mm-f2-8-micro-four-thirds-lens/p1531036

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capto e2
2 1.5k 7 United Kingdom
31 Dec 2012 6:53PM
My advice would be to buy any of the leading makes with a kit lens. This will enable you to get very good images, depending on your growing experience. After awhile you will be able to answer your own questions about which kit to buy. Just remember cameras and lenses are only tools, its your skill in using them that counts. Software is also part of the equation. There is plenty of free stuff to start with and your choice of camera will come with the manufacturers own software progammes.

ivor
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
31 Dec 2012 8:14PM

Quote:My advice would be to buy any of the leading makes with a kit lens


Most are leading makes these days Smile
ChrisV 8 883 26 United Kingdom
1 Jan 2013 10:49AM

Quote:((Newer m4/3 models are good cameras too - although personally I would steer away from any that use the older 12mp sensor which is fairly noisy at relatively modest ISOs. The 16mp one used in all newer models gives more resolution and better low-light performance. The outgoing models look like great value - they're OK if you've always got good light to deal with))

Have you used any of these 12 mp sensors Chris, there not as bad as you make out, there very useful up to modest ISO`s, sure there not as good as the most up to date sensors, and this goes for all 6



Yes - in fact I've still got a PEN light which I bought as a cheap replacement for the GF1 I had nicked a few years ago. The Panny was much the better camera in just about every respect, (aside from build quality , i much preferred the ergonomics) although it too wasn't great in low light it was rather better than the PEN, which I'd be loathe to use much above ISO400. The G3 and GX1 I've used more recently are massively improved in this regard and I'm led to believe the Olys based around the same sensor yield results that are at least as good.
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
1 Jan 2013 12:08PM

Quote:((Newer m4/3 models are good cameras too - although personally I would steer away from any that use the older 12mp sensor which is fairly noisy at relatively modest ISOs. The 16mp one used in all newer models gives more resolution and better low-light performance. The outgoing models look like great value - they're OK if you've always got good light to deal with))

Have you used any of these 12 mp sensors Chris, there not as bad as you make out, there very useful up to modest ISO`s, sure there not as good as the most up to date sensors, and this goes for all 6

.



I wouldn't disagree that the M4/3 16Mp sensors are slightly better than the 12Mp - but not to any extent that would be noticed by a beginner buying his first serious camera.

I moved from the Olympus E-PL3 (12Mp) to the OM-D (16Mp) mainly for the "proper" eye-level viewfinder and did notice a very slight improvement in IQ at very large print sizes. But that should not detract from the fact that I produced award-winning A3 prints with the E-PL3 at up to ISO1000. Taking it to ISO 1600 did lead to some noise that was noticeable in large prints.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
1 Jan 2013 7:36PM

Quote:The G3 and GX1 I've used more recently are massively improved in this regard and I'm led to believe the Olys based around the same sensor yield results that are at least as good


They both use a pretty old sensor, and its not the same as used by the latest pens either.

I still use a Pany G2, fine up to 1600 ISO, it used the same 12mp sensor as the pens, but the pany processing is no where near as good.
1 Jan 2013 8:02PM

Quote:

For example, the superb Olympus E-PL3 with a 14-42mm lens is currently being sold by Amazon.co.uk at 279.


Thanks - I do not normally look for prices at Amazon - AP is my usual starting point.
mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
2 Jan 2013 12:36PM
Let's get practical about this, based on the majority of the camera-buying public (and I don't mean to be disparaging):
Most people who buy DSLRs buy the camera with kit lens and never buy another lens in their life because they only want something that records their lives with better image quality than their compact or digital phone. Also, most entry-level cameras nowadays (be they DSLR or micro 4/3) are likely to exceed the abilities of the new user for at least a couple of years. So the question is, how likely are you to use it and develop photography as a hobby?

I would go with the others who recommend micro 4/3 and there are two main reasons for this: they offer a more compact system at excellent prices and the smaller size means you are more likely to take it with you and get interested in photography. Secondly, if you do want to take advantage of the specific benefits of DSLR (be it APS-C or 35mm) the micro 4/3 will still be useful as a second system when you want something compact.
If you buy micro 4/3 and don't need any more you have won on all counts. If you go straight to APS-C and want something more compact you may end up buying micro 4/3 anyway.

I started with a Canon 30D then upgraded to 7D. My Panasonic micro 4/3 plus 2 lenses is smaller than the 7D body+battery grip (without a lens). Guess which gets more use...and I can be hard pressed to tell the difference in image quality in most cases.
javam e2
10 1.1k 19 United Kingdom
2 Jan 2013 3:21PM
Another vote for M4/3

Like Mike I have a 7D, but I now take that only if the reason I am going out is photos i.e. a landscape shoot, airshow etc. If I am out with the family, sightseeing or just heading to work I take my E-PL3 with me.

I picked up the E-PL3 twin lens kit and have added a wide angle converter. All of those now live in a Lowepro Passport sling and (like Mike has found) take up less space (and weigh less) than my 7D body with grip attached.

For the type of shots I am taking with it the ISO performance is perfectly fine as I would not expect to print anything larger than A4.

Having something light weight, inconspicuous and always with me makes me much more likely to use it and I am finding I am being much more creative with it that I ever was with the 7D.
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
2 Jan 2013 3:57PM

Quote:Having something light weight, inconspicuous and always with me makes me much more likely to use it and I am finding I am being much more creative with it that I ever was with the 7D.


Indeed. That was the reason I ditched my Canon 5D Mk II in favour of M4/3...... first an Olympus E-PL2 and now the OM-D.

The latest offerings from Olympus (E-PL5 and E-PM2) are worth a look as a first system camera. They have the same sensor and, obviously, use the same lenses as the OM-D (which has won several 'camera of the year' awards).
pablophotographer 3 496 187
4 Jan 2013 9:51PM
Hi, happy new year to you.

I think before you invest your money in a camera it's good to set your budget, the ownership or not of any film SLR lenses (usable to DSLRs on their own -as in the case of Pentax- or via adaptors as in the case of Minoltas to Sony and Olympus to newer Olympus micro4/3 threads) it's also important to consider what sort of photography will you be doing and how often. (wild-life requires big lenses, architecture prime and wide ones) Would you carry around your stuff by car (for landscape), or on foot (for street photography?)? I know people who after having bought a DSLR and a couple of lenses they are not taking them in travels due to their bulk. I am happy with my bridge camera, which has a zoom lens.

Good luck with whatever you decide.
15 Jan 2013 11:43AM
You wanna start with a pretty simple one, canon are pretty good starters i recommend the Canon EOS 1100d, 600D or 650D. I have the 1100D its a great camera, i think they may have discontinued it though.
RavenTepes 5 199 United States
20 Jan 2013 6:15PM
I'd first ask myself if you really need a dlsr. That means you intend to buy lenses other than what it comes equipped with, weather you need something really wide, or something longer. If you don't intend to get other lenses, stop there and consider a bridge camera with an all in one 30-40x zoom, or something like that. If you want to be able to change lenses, ask yourself about size. How big do you need/ want it to be? Do you nessesarily need a dslr, or would a mirrorless system be more appropriate to your needs? Also, you need to take into consideration any future lenses you may want to obtain. A lot of people stick with one company or another, simply because photography is a potentially huge investment which can easily cost up to several thousand quid. Most people don't have the resources to invest in multiple companies.

Personally, I'd weigh my options and confided what my needs and wants are. Once you figure that out, go from there. Its difficult to get a bad camera, no matter who you choose to go with, and there are plenty of options for brands. Just think of your needs and the future, is all i'm saying. But I like Nikon, for the record Smile

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