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First wedding.... New lens?

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Buchephalus
10 Aug 2012 - 9:19 AM

All the best with shooting the wedding, hope you've considered a backup body and flash, use quality cards you've tested in the camera beforehand if they are new. I've had 4, 16Gb Kingston cards fail at a wedding, thankfully they were just being tested to see if they were working ok during the meal. As for the lens if it's your first wedding to be honest don't faff around changing lenses to much, keep the 24-70 on for most of the time, another lens on another body will be more useful. That way you can grab the shot and switch back to the zoom when it's needed. Fumbling with lenses during important moments won't win you any friendsSad

I assume you've done your homework in shooting a wedding and have the shoot planned and a backup plan if the weather is foulSmile

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cozzmic
cozzmic  2
10 Aug 2012 - 9:34 AM

Got to agree with Buchephalus regarding in planning the shoot. Go to the venue before the wedding and suss out what is there and look for positions for shots with the group and the bride and groom. I usually go a week earlier with a member of the family to get some input from them and what they are after also did the same with bride and groom about what specific shots they wanted. Another good thing is get someone who can organise the groups of families and get them together for shots. MAKE A LIST of what pics required, makes life easier.

User_Removed
10 Aug 2012 - 9:53 AM

The thread has now moved to the important issues of shooting a wedding.

Peter, I wasn't being negative earlier. It's just that you can have the best kit in the world but if you don't know your way around a wedding shoot, it'll be very tough to get it right.
Like some of the real wedding togs on here have already mentioned (As opposed to the one's who imagine they take good wedding shots?) it's a good idea to visit the wedding venue and work out where the sun is at the time of the wedding, if there's an alternative venue should the weather be a little wet, take a few practice shots, get yourself a list of photos the bride and groom are particularly looking for and know your kit. Know how to use it in a hurry as weddings don't stop for the photographer. You have to see things before they happen and have the knowledge of what's going to happen next.
Don't be scared of the wedding shoot and if you can, gain some experience by asking a wedding photographer if you can tag along just to watch what he/she does prior to your own shoot date.

So I'm sure you'll get further advice on here but I'll leave you with hoping it all goes well for you and most of all, enjoy the day.
PM me if I can help further as I feel these threads just turn into arguments and this is not the place for all that.

Good luck Peter. Wink

thewilliam
10 Aug 2012 - 10:21 AM

Nikon is a good choice for wedding work, partly because the flash system is so controllable.

If the budget is tight, consider buying used kit. Grays, Ffordes and MPB are reliable places to buy.

Whatever you choose, get it well in advance of the wedding and practice using it. What separates the seasoned professional from the amateur is familiarity with the kit and the ability to use it without any conscious thought. Just like an experienced motorist who can do a hundred other things while driving.

Lucian
Lucian  4561 forum posts
10 Aug 2012 - 1:55 PM

The canon 24-105 is rerely of my camera at weddings. I carry a 70-200 but dont need it unless a minister tells me i have to stand far away.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315351 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
10 Aug 2012 - 2:34 PM


Quote: I carry a 70-200 but dont need it unless a minister tells me i have to stand far away

Hehe Smile

peterjones
peterjones e2 Member 123934 forum postspeterjones vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
10 Aug 2012 - 3:05 PM

Hmm I guess that is one reason for buying a 70-200 but not the first that springs to mind .... must be getting out of date, time to retire methinks Grin

Last Modified By peterjones at 10 Aug 2012 - 3:05 PM
Boyd
Boyd  1011213 forum posts Wales11 Constructive Critique Points
10 Aug 2012 - 3:07 PM


Quote: I carry a 70-200 but dont need it unless a minister tells me i have to stand far away

Would that be a smellyphoto lens?

Peter23
Peter23  62 Constructive Critique Points
10 Aug 2012 - 8:02 PM

Wow,

Allot of feedback which is great! Biggest thing here seams to be a back up body. Just looked into lens renting and its cheaper than I thought! Anyone had any experience with this and good sites?

Thanks everyone for your opinions!

Pete

scottishphototours

Peter,

Time to get realistic!!

Are you doing this as the paid professional on the day?? Are you going to a venue to shoot pictures?? - if so, then you better enquire with the venue about their policy on you shooting on their premises and whether or not they expect you to have public liability insurance. MANY venues now ask for this and I know of people who have been turned away from venues when they didn't have it. You can expect to pay around 400 for a policy combining equipment insurance, PL insurance and PI insurance from the likes of Aaduki. Your PI covers you when you deliver rubbish and the Bride wants to sue you, so worth having...

Get the business stuff sorted and worry about the equipment later! - your D700 and 24-70 could shoot 90% of this wedding, so a backup body is essential and a 70-200 would be useful.

BTW, Calumet for renting stuff.

Andy

peterjones
peterjones e2 Member 123934 forum postspeterjones vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
11 Aug 2012 - 2:43 PM


Quote: when you deliver rubbish

eeek I hope not ....

Seriously hard as it may seem a good point is made; a wedding day is an totally urepeatable day; 95% of weddings go wthout any problem but sometimes your equipment may fail, the sun or rain may pour down and you have little shelter, the officiant, guests or bride and groom (as happened to me once) don't want you to take pictures; a guest has an epileptic fit and so on and so forth; as the William says you need to know your technique so very well it is as natural to you as eating and sleeping.

True to say that a few venues are ensuring that the photographer has his/her own PL insurance; it hasn't happened to me yet but it is only a question of time.

If you are that determined your D700, 24-70 and SB700 will be fine; your proposal of a 50mm f/1.4 is excellent with a back up flash gun; do get another Nikon body; in the meantime study, study, research and practise all you can.

Again, g'luck, Peter.

MrGoatsmilk
11 Aug 2012 - 5:36 PM


Quote:
Seriously hard as it may seem a good point is made; a wedding day is an totally urepeatable day; 95% of weddings go wthout any problem but sometimes your equipment may fail, the sun or rain may pour down and you have little shelter, the officiant, guests or bride and groom (as happened to me once) don't want you to take pictures; a guest has an epileptic fit and so on and so forth; as the William says you need to know your technique so very well it is as natural to you as eating and sleeping.



A couple of things I have experienced.

I had lenses fog up during a so called summer wedding, bit chilly outside and the room where the ceremony took place was across from the exit door to the kitchens so there I was stood at the back then boom the humid air decends! Luckily I had my backup gear inside and the main tog was at the front of the room away from the "jetsteam" (see what I did there)

I have also had grooms that just don't want to have their photo's taken they see having a few taken as a necessary evil but all they want to do is hit the bar. Shame really as after the wedding and the money has gone the only record is the photo's from the day.

People always always wonder off so make sure you get the group shots before they get too bored. Also look out for kids they run around doing all sorts and make some great photo's.

Main thing for me is relax and keep looking in all directions as you will see allsorts of things happening that the couple will miss.

Looking forward to hearing how you get on.

All the best

Stu

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