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Floods and devastation

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Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1314968 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
26 Feb 2014 - 11:26 PM

Its the levels of ground water that need monitoring but this will probably be pretty difficult unless there were many many more bore holes.

There were once thoughts of building pipe lines to move large quantities of water what ever happened to that.

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26 Feb 2014 - 11:26 PM

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brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110181 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
27 Feb 2014 - 8:45 AM


Quote: Its the levels of ground water that need monitoring but this will probably be pretty difficult unless there were many many more bore holes.


you don't want to be drilling any more holes, as that will just encourage the water to come to the surface and contribute to the flooding - concrete it all over and keep water where it belongs - you know it makes sense Wink

adrian_w
adrian_w e2 Member 63280 forum postsadrian_w vcard Scotland4 Constructive Critique Points
27 Feb 2014 - 9:57 AM


Quote: concrete it all over and keep water where it belongs - you know it makes sense

Yes, if you build houses over the top of it, that will help keep the water in the ground won't it.
After all, thats what we've been doing for a number of years now.

Evertonian
28 Feb 2014 - 9:46 AM

There is that much water about, it looks like somebody has been diluting the stuff!

col_c
col_c  1 United Kingdom
28 Feb 2014 - 11:05 AM

Groundwater flooding is where water from underlying rocks or occasional springs reaches the surface after prolonged rainfall. It is very difficult to deal with but pumping from a cellar sometimes works. Other methods are to waterproof a cellar (tanking). Sometimes diverting spring water can help. However the surest method is to build susceptible houses on stilts (or floating houses like the Dutch have developed) so that they are resilient to flooding.

Most of the recent flooding was surface water flooding from rainfall or overtopping rivers. This can be tackled with river defences or local defences around individual properties.

The common thread of all this is that we need to make space for water, first by natural means such as forests or marshland, then not building on flood plains without making them flood-resilient, then building flood defences and drainage schemes. We have tended to do this back to front by going straight to flood defences and drainage. This works some of the time but increasingly as floods become more severe and frequent we are having to look to these other means to manage floods.

thewilliam
28 Feb 2014 - 11:57 AM

The problem with a high water table is that any void, such as a tanked cellar will experience a buoyancy force equal to the mass of water that would fill the cellar. This force is enough to lift an empty swimming pool clear out of the ground as if it were a boat or enough to cause structural damage to a house.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1314968 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
1 Mar 2014 - 1:56 AM

Maybe we should start exporting our surplus water, most of it ends up back in the sea anyway.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Eg_YlI7l4E

answersonapostcard
answersonapostcard Site Moderator 1012553 forum postsanswersonapostcard vcard United Kingdom15 Constructive Critique Points
1 Mar 2014 - 10:11 AM

We have to work with the water, explore sustainable drainage solutions using the landscape and not fighting it. Its not going to be one solution over another. Building on piles might save the house temporarily but it can still a flood can still wash away the ground beneath, as the recent situation in Newcastle.

Last Modified By answersonapostcard at 1 Mar 2014 - 10:12 AM
col_c
col_c  1 United Kingdom
1 Mar 2014 - 1:11 PM

tewkesbury-1.jpg

Hi answers, I agree with you on working with water rather than fighting it as nature always wins in the end.
But the Newcastle situation was very unusual. In that case a culverted watercourse 'escaped' from its culvert during intense rainfall and scoured out a new course, exposing the piled foundations of a block of flats and leaving them looking rather precarious.
Raising buildings above expected water levels is a traditional method of avoiding the worst of flood damage and works well. It is common in places along flood-prone rivers, like Gloucester or Tewkesbury (see photo), to see buildings on stilts with the open ground floor used for parking and living areas above - a very sensible and practical solution to flooding.

answersonapostcard
answersonapostcard Site Moderator 1012553 forum postsanswersonapostcard vcard United Kingdom15 Constructive Critique Points
1 Mar 2014 - 1:44 PM

yes, I agree, perhaps I didnt explain myself properly, not unusual! Wink

Evertonian
2 Mar 2014 - 9:54 AM

Perhaps we ought to build more reservoirs and pump any surplus water into them before it become a flooding problem.

brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110181 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
2 Mar 2014 - 12:08 PM


Quote: Perhaps we ought to build more reservoirs and pump any surplus water into them before it become a flooding problem.

They won't reverse policy surely Wink

after just closing them down

This is fun too - drought warning because of reservoir closure, how things change and so quickly

as here

Mind you, what we had this winter was probably "the wrong kind of rain" Grin

thewilliam
2 Mar 2014 - 12:48 PM

You can't blame the water companies for wanting to make the best use of their assets and maximize profits. They're now businesses after all. Many reservoir sites are now in prime locations.

Maybe some bean-counter will advise the the water companies to sell all their land for building and give up the supply of water altogether!

Last Modified By thewilliam at 2 Mar 2014 - 12:48 PM
brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110181 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
2 Mar 2014 - 1:15 PM

Its interesting that after a quick search I couldn't find any clear legislation relating to the duty of water companies regarding the storage and distribution of drinking water to the consumer.

I'm sure there must be somewhere but at first glance it appears to be down the them to decide what they will do and how they will do it, so if that is the case, yes, as you say, you can't blame them - it looks like another bonkers bit of successive governments ****-ups in the guise of "progress"!

Last Modified By brian1208 at 2 Mar 2014 - 1:43 PM

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