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Garden Diary - What's Going On In Yours?


cattyal e2
9 6.4k 6 England
12 Nov 2012 10:23AM
That's something I'd like to do - not chopping down my trees - but building a nice pile of logs at the bottom of the corner for wee beasties Smile

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montechoro e2
12 2.3k 2 United Kingdom
12 Nov 2012 1:59PM
Amazingly and for the first time ever - we had a second flush of rhubarb shoot up in October this year. Just a few stems but we've never had that before.
brian1208 e2
11 10.6k 12 United Kingdom
12 Nov 2012 3:29PM
We have two lovely Clematis in bloom, the large bloom type not the cirrhosa, which is as usual out at this time of year (and looking very healthy) .

I hope that's not storing up trouble for next year but they do look very nice against this dull grey and damp weather, seems a shame to prune then off just yet though
montechoro e2
12 2.3k 2 United Kingdom
12 Nov 2012 3:58PM

Quote:We have two lovely Clematis in bloom, the large bloom type not the cirrhosa, which is as usual out at this time of year (and looking very healthy) .

I hope that's not storing up trouble for next year but they do look very nice against this dull grey and damp weather, seems a shame to prune then off just yet though



Ditto Brian - my Clematis "Nelly Moser" is in bloom next to the front door. Like you - I hope its not a problem for next year
JackAllTog e2
5 4.0k 58 United Kingdom
12 Nov 2012 4:26PM
Its a new garden for us that's been neglected apart from grass cutting, so lots of fresh digging and bulb planting. Lots of existing white bulbs are sprouting below ground, more like tulip bulbs than daffodils - waiting to see.

Almost all leaves fallen now and last apples picked. Hoping that Helleborus buds will flower soon.
Birds, squirrels and a fox are visiting the bird feeding station.
KarenFB e2
8 4.4k 163 England
14 Nov 2012 7:36AM
Okay, not quite 'garden', but I've been out about on the farm looking at all the Holly bushes. I have never seen so few berries!! Last year was a bumper year, perhaps the trees are trying to recover!

Anyway, I suspect the price of fresh holly will soar this year!
cattyal e2
9 6.4k 6 England
14 Nov 2012 8:29AM
I was hoping to pinch a bit from the Holly bush at work for some xmas card piccies but there are no berries either - very disappointing. At least I've no shortage of ivy at home Smile
montechoro e2
12 2.3k 2 United Kingdom
14 Nov 2012 10:03PM
8 years ago, I bought and planted some saffron crocus bulbs from Hillier nurseries after my wife complained about the cost of buying saffron strands for cooking.

The first year we had bright green, healthy lush leaves and no flowers at all.

The second year we had lush green leaves and again no flowers. Hilliers recommended changing the soil and the planting depth. We did. Nothing.

Years 3 and 4 - Hilliers advised us not to feed the bulbs as they prefer a poor, free draining soil. We had lush green leaves, no flowers.

Year 5 - Hilliers said the bulbs were difficult to grow and recommended another free draining soil, with less nutrients. Lush leaves - no flowers.

Years 6/7 - Hilliers thought the bulbs could be a bad batch were "blind" or secretly, that I was an idiot. Again for 2 years - lush green growth - no flowers.

Year 8 - Today I have the first purple flower ever appearing and emerging from the crocus bulbs. I could not believe my eyes. I still have the lush green leaves - but after 8 unproductive years my first saffron crocus flower is about to burst open.

No wonder it's so ruddy expensive to buy in the shops. Knowing my luck, the dog will dig it up to bury a bone Grin
brian1208 e2
11 10.6k 12 United Kingdom
14 Nov 2012 10:41PM
At least you had the patience to leave it in place. Think how good that saffron is going to taste Smile

(Many years ago my wife dug up a "Difficult" plant and slung it on the compost heap, only to find it in full bloom there a month or so later!)
montechoro e2
12 2.3k 2 United Kingdom
15 Nov 2012 4:16AM

Quote:At least you had the patience to leave it in place. Think how good that saffron is going to taste Smile

(Many years ago my wife dug up a "Difficult" plant and slung it on the compost heap, only to find it in full bloom there a month or so later!)



LOL Brian. I have thought many times about digging up the saffron bulbs and throwing them away. I was getting fed up with just seeing the the spectacular, lush leaves every year. I only left them in because I thought that with such fabulous leaves - something must be happening inside the bulb. Anyway, having been left in place in poor quality, low nutrient, free draining soil - I finally have flowers.

Also re your difficult plant / compost heap experience - that must have raised a smile or two in your household.

Will post the "taste test" results of the garden fresh saffron strands when they are ready. It will be interesting to see how they compare to the glass jar variety Grin

Searching for a recipe now to bring out the best of the saffron .......................... any ideas or suggestions for using the saffron most welcome.

According to the BBC it takes 250,000 saffron stigmas to make just half a kilo of saffron strands - I've got about 20 bulbs at best - so it will be very precious in our house whilst it lasts.
KarenFB e2
8 4.4k 163 England
23 Dec 2012 7:38AM
It's wet...............very, very wet!

Last night I found a frog in my hall (thanks Taffy!!!!) - it was very dry and very fluffy, but as I bent down to pick it up it gasped! So there was I, in the pitch black of night with the rain pouring down, gently dunking a frog into the pond (hoping to wash the fluff off if nothing else). To my surprise, as soon as it touched the water it leapt from my hands!!!

Frogs, in December! It may be wet, but at least it's warm! I haven't lit the log fire in a week!
SlowSong e2
6 4.8k 29 England
23 Dec 2012 1:44PM
Ah, the joys of young cats. Been there, done that, never again. I'll get a dog instead. Grin

My gardens like a quagmire. Just mud, oh, and fat where the birds drop stuff then the pigeons tread it all in.
brian1208 e2
11 10.6k 12 United Kingdom
23 Dec 2012 2:11PM
its "pruning" time in our garden - as in, taking 5ft off the top of our Liquidambar Gum tree and starting to remove all the growth from a decrepit arbour (a right bugger of a job as its covered with years of woody Clematis and Passion Flower vines)

As our front and back gardens are all shingle we don't get problems with mud and when the sun comes out the yellow / brown tones of the shingle look quite pleasing (not that we have seen much sun recently of course Smile )

Hellebores are beginning to bloom and the Celandines are putting up their new growth along with the snowdrops so our mini-woodland garden patch (about 5ft x 4ft) should start to look interesting in a few weeks
arnieg e2
10 682 England
23 Dec 2012 2:20PM
bit to much water the middle was a path right side raised beds dscn0047.jpg

brian1208 e2
11 10.6k 12 United Kingdom
23 Dec 2012 2:21PM
Ouch!

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