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Gimmick or Godsend


CaptivePhotons e2
11 1.6k 2 England
28 Jan 2011 9:04AM
As somebody who has very poor colour vision, I am seriously contemplating buying x-rite colour checker passport .

My feeling is that I would not have to worry too much about colour rendition, just let the software do the work for me.

I have read a lot of reviews, most of them favourable, but would like to know if anybody here has real world experience of the product. Particularly those phtographers who have colour blindness.

Thanks.

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User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
28 Jan 2011 2:15PM
This doesn't answer your question (I believe the correct answer would be "good idea" ) but a friend of mine has been a dead keen photographer for the 40 years I have known him and he suffers from red/green colour blindness.

About 5 or 6 years ago he finally decided to concentrate exclusively on monochrome and, to be honest, he now shoots stunning photographs and wins all sorts of prizes. His explanation of the improvement is that he now approaches the craft and selects shots from a monochrome perspective, rather than doing what most of us do - i.e. shooting for colour but deciding in post-exposure processing that a shot "might look good" in black and white.

.
miptog e2
9 3.5k 61 United Kingdom
28 Jan 2011 2:37PM
There are several factors to consider:

- How poor is your colour vision
- Although the software may make some changes, could your eyes actually notice the difference
- Would not a grey card give you much the same result or using a custom white balance
- Accurate colour rendition in capture is a combination of correct colour balance, and accurate exposure plus
ideally also have a colour managed flow, where are devices are calibrated including the printer

Just some thoughts, and hope it helps.
Dave_Collier e2
8 236 2 England
28 Jan 2011 3:04PM
I bought the product a while back, and once I had managed to get the detail of how to use the product from all of the 'How Great This Product Is' verbage of the instructions, it is relativley straight forward to use.

I certainly notice that when you load the colour profile in Camera Raw of Photoshop, that certain colours that looked lacklustre before, became vibrant and true to life.

My only criticism apart from having to read nearly 60 pages of instructions to get to the bit I was interested in, is actually finding the instructions. They are embeded in the application and are found by clicking on 'Help'.

On the issue of being colour blind, a friend at a camera club I used to belong to printed all his own colour work from negatives, and when asked why did not do black and white, he would reply that he saw everything in colour, his work was not too bad either.
MeanGreeny e2
9 3.7k England
28 Jan 2011 3:41PM

Quote:This doesn't answer your question (I believe the correct answer would be "good idea" ) but a friend of mine has been a dead keen photographer for the 40 years I have known him and he suffers from red/green colour blindness.

About 5 or 6 years ago he finally decided to concentrate exclusively on monochrome and, to be honest, he now shoots stunning photographs and wins all sorts of prizes. His explanation of the improvement is that he now approaches the craft and selects shots from a monochrome perspective, rather than doing what most of us do - i.e. shooting for colour but deciding in post-exposure processing that a shot "might look good" in black and white.

.



Sounds awfully familiar - apart from the 'winning all sorts of prizes' bit Tongue
thewilliam e2
6 4.9k
28 Jan 2011 5:58PM
Something like 25% of men have defective colour vision, according to the training people at Kodak Harrow.

When I was there 12 years ago for colour grading course, they put us through the Farnsworth-Munsell test which is the stiffest of them all. The ladies put us to shame.

Yes colour calibration devices are certainly worth getting.
CaptivePhotons e2
11 1.6k 2 England
28 Jan 2011 6:39PM
Thanks all for your input. I will probably take the plunge.


Quote:Sounds awfully familiar - apart from the 'winning all sorts of prizes'


Yup, I too thought Dave was referring to me until I reached the prizes part Grin

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