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Help! I need advice on Studio Flash!


Grin Hi everyone!

I am shooting a model tomorrow at my home/studio and urgently need some tips and pointers for working with studio flash!
I have just purchased the SB-900 Nikon Speedlite flash gun and I also have a Studio Lighting Kit with x2 500W flash heads.

I have a bit of a problem as the model I am shooting has put a small amount of weight on since I last saw her and is indignant that she wants lingerie shots. So I need to make the lighting as flattering as possible, but without the picture ending up too dark.

Does anyone have any tips/pointers on flattering lighting set-ups?

Also tips any advice on using studio flash? I just always seem to bleach out detail when using it! It seems such a shame to own the equipment and not quite be able to use it to effect!

Thanks in advance for your response!

Sarah G x

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BigRick 9 2.1k 3 United Kingdom
20 Sep 2010 7:48PM
have you tried the search feature on the site??

and as far as putting on weight.... where has the weight been put on? any specific area, or all over?? the reason i ask is because if it is in a specific place, then i would say it is less about the lighting and more about the pose.... to be not so subtle.... fat arse, get her to sit on a squashy cushion to hide it fat stomach, then they could lay down on their front and hide it... etc etc.... shadows and larger people dont owrk well either,, so as far as the lighting goes, i would go for high key bright and shallow DOF images that hide edges a little and give a softness to the 'ripples' .... sorry but i cant think of nice ways of putting it at the minute.. lol.. long day. Wink Smile
cameracat 11 8.6k 61 Norfolk Island
20 Sep 2010 11:09PM

Quote:I just always seem to bleach out detail when using it



Try using less power, Move lights further from subject, Dial in the correct aperture OR at least start at something like f/8, Shutter at 1/125s.

Try using just one studio head.

Try bouncing one head of a wall, ( White or neutral is best, Strong colour walls can add a cast )

Have you got a reflector or two.....???

One single studio strobe and a one carefully placed reflector, Can make for something more arty, Rather than lighting the whole street.....Smile

Add extra diffusion to your softboxes OR brollies for that matter.......Grin

Its a case of mix match, Try and try again until you get the result you want.......Don't just wack a light left and right of the camera, Then pour tons of light all over your model.
That just produces the burnouts you mention.......Wink
jimthistle73 10 2.4k 1 United Kingdom
21 Sep 2010 1:33AM
Big softbox will help if you have one. Also, concentrate on good features - has she got nice eyes? Shoot from above where possible and throw the, ahem, fleshy areas out of focus with a small aperture and the merest blink of flash.

Try one key light above her with the big softbox and another light near you / on camera, throwing out a smallish amount of fill light. An old recipe, but works well.
john64 e2
10 824 England
21 Sep 2010 1:24PM
I'd agree with the Cat, single light source, low key effect. Just concentrate the viewer's attention on the details you want them to see rather than those you don't.

... or ask her to model a burkha for you Wink
hahahaha! I like your style Wink Give it a couple of years and Im sure that wont be a far cry from the pages of Zoo and Nuts!!

Thanks everyone for your tips and advice - I tried a little bit of everything and I'm quite pleased with the end result, although its not some of my better work..... but hey, practice makes perfect right?!

I'll upload a few of the pics so you can enjoy at your leisure!

Thanks again Grin

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