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HMV about to go under

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mdpontin
mdpontin  106016 forum posts Scotland
15 Jan 2013 - 9:20 AM

I notice from the Telegraph article linked to by Pete (above) that the man Trevor Moore replaced at HMV was Simon Fox, who was previously responsible for Comet.

Last Modified By mdpontin at 15 Jan 2013 - 9:21 AM
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15 Jan 2013 - 9:20 AM

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mossy
mossy  146 forum posts England1 Constructive Critique Points
15 Jan 2013 - 9:24 AM

A shame though there is hope they may survive in some form as the entertainment industry need some sort of high street prescence.

They were expensive, and should have concentrated more on their core product, rumours that WH Smiths, and Warterstones, could follow.

shame.

Last Modified By mossy at 15 Jan 2013 - 9:25 AM
lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1014170 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
15 Jan 2013 - 9:34 AM


Quote: as the entertainment industry need some sort of high street prescence.

Why ?

digicammad
digicammad  1121988 forum posts United Kingdom37 Constructive Critique Points
15 Jan 2013 - 9:39 AM

Must admit this did surprise me, the store in Southport is busy every time I go in there.

brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110366 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
15 Jan 2013 - 9:44 AM

Part of the problem is that highfootfall and sales turnover doesn't necessarily relate to high profits

SlowSong
SlowSong e2 Member 64537 forum postsSlowSong vcard England29 Constructive Critique Points
15 Jan 2013 - 9:58 AM

Another sad day. I used to love hanging round the shops. They usually had some great music playing and you could look through all the sections for folk, classical, dance, world etc. as well as pop. Shame they seemed to be pushing videos more and more lately. You can't beat flicking through the records (or CDs) and finding some gems. I never came out without something. Once again, like Jessops, I probably won't be adding much to my music collection from now on except for the occasional download. The visit was most of the enjoyment. I've nothing near me now except a couple of indi second hand and charity shops.

JackAllTog
JackAllTog e2 Member 53671 forum postsJackAllTog vcard United Kingdom58 Constructive Critique Points
15 Jan 2013 - 10:11 AM

Part of the buzz of HMV and similar stores as a kid was the feeling of cool you got from hanging out there and choosing/ listening to music - a great way to feel part of and become attracted to the music scene. A modern HMV has no soul.
We instead have TV talent shows and internet radio - but less of a feel of individual identity within in those environments.

Crazy idea - Lets see record producers sponsor youth coffee clubs with digital jukeboxes - there may be loads of empty HMV stores soon to do this, get a free track token with your coffee purchase. Get some individuality back into music. And purposeful life back into the high street.

brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110366 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
15 Jan 2013 - 10:24 AM


Quote: Crazy idea - Lets see record producers sponsor youth coffee clubs with digital jukeboxes - there may be loads of empty HMV stores soon to do this, get a free track token with your coffee purchase. Get some individuality back into music. And purposeful life back into the high street.

Oh yes, I like it.

It would also give us "Olds" the chance to complain about all these youths hanging about listening to this trashy music - just like my grandparent generation used to about my lot in the '50s and '60s Grin

Like others, I do worry that our high streets are turning into a wasteland whilst everyone complains about the management of these chain stores, not accepting that, if you buy on line you are part of the problem, If we want local stores we must be prepared to buy local, even though it will cost us more

Our local businesses are fighting back

see here

but I wonder if anyone else will listen? Sad

Carrera_c
Carrera_c  5256 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
15 Jan 2013 - 10:33 AM


Quote: as the entertainment industry need some sort of high street prescence.

Why ?

I couldn't agree more, the entertainment industry has changed a lot as net streaming and internet shopping has matured. We will always have cinemas and live gigs to get us out and about to 'experience' our desired entertainment in a social setting. It's sad to say but high street film and music retails just isn't required on the scale it used to be. I can't remember the last time I looked at a CD or DVD in a shop.

Meheecho
Meheecho  1275 forum posts United Kingdom
15 Jan 2013 - 10:39 AM

Sad to see another long established business going down the swannee. I have bought on-line but still enjoy the "physical" side of purchasing.
Steve

scartlane
scartlane  368 forum posts United Kingdom
15 Jan 2013 - 11:27 AM

the big problem is that the internet is cheaper, i went in looking this last weekend, and everything i "wanted" was more expensive than on amazon, i know its crap cos htey dont pay tax and i feel for all the people out of work, but if i can save my money and still get what i want, y pay more?
its all great saying we should buy in shops etc to keep them open, but what are we getting for our extra money? going round town, getting acosted by chavs, having to put up with familes arguing, kids running around being rude? and im paying more to park, more to get the item, and i gotta put up with that, id rather buy online, wait a few days, n actually enjoy my free time.
the high street needs to change its attitudes and ideals quickly or it will become completly empty.
They say things go in cycles, prehaps this is just the downside of the high street, prehaps out of the ashes of this poor effort a better high street will come along?

brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110366 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
15 Jan 2013 - 12:19 PM


Quote: the big problem is that the internet is cheaper

always has been and always will be as it doesn't have the fixed costs that any real store does.

as purchasers we need to factor in whether we are only worried about paying the least now or whether we feel it is worth paying a bit more to keep the services local and convenient (and at the same time, help keep local people employed)

I know which way I went, and it wasn't to go for the cheapest option but we all differ

If you do go the cheapest route its difficult to see how anyone can the cry over the closure of your local services as thats a direct consequence of the decision you (and others made)

One last thought, once all the real stores are gone, do you think the on-line prices will stay down, or is it just possible the may take the opportunity to hike them up? Wink

Last Modified By brian1208 at 15 Jan 2013 - 12:24 PM
keith selmes
15 Jan 2013 - 1:02 PM

Why would I go into town to a record shop to buy an mp3 track in a real store ?
If I buy an actual CD I've got to rip the tracks illegally.
If ripping is legalised, it's likely we'll get drm on CD, so we'll have to circumvent that illegally.

If I buy mp3 from Amazon, they not only deliver immediately to my PC, but they also put them on the free cloud storage they give me, and with no DRM.
And it's legal.

I do feel sorry for the little white doggie though.

I still have a few vinyl and shellac records, and a gramophone, from a combination of nostalgia and historical curiosity.
But I would have thought that was the sort of special interest that thrives best on line, where the potential market is so much bigger.

lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1014170 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
15 Jan 2013 - 1:09 PM


Quote: Why would I go into town to a record shop to buy an mp3 track in a real store ?

Indeed and why would you buy a DVD when you can download it.
The idea of content (music/film/tv/books) being tied to physical objects belongs back in the 20th century.

AlexandraSD
15 Jan 2013 - 1:21 PM

Yes technology has moved on but people are still stuck in the dark ages, yes MP3's are mre versatile than Vinyl and CD's, and while many of us do have MP3 players, most still have a basic CD player in the car, or they dont know their mp3 can connect, or whatever.

I am a bit confused though, as mentioned already, my local HMV was always busy, well both of them in fact, the Kings Lynn branch and Peterborough one. There was always a queue deeper than 10 customers, and always no more than 3 staff on the checkout, so how thbey can lose money by charging 15 for a CD i do not know, they shoulda been raking it in, specially now that kids spend all their pocket money on Call Of Nature and other games for wiiiiiiiis and gameboys.

I actually owe HMV a thank you and an apology, i was caught shoplifting when i was 19, spent the day in a cell, **** me up so much i didnt do it again. Not something im proud of but im glad i got caught, it taught me a lesson, so im quite sad to see them go despite me being banned from every HMV in the uk, though of course i still shopped there, after a few years anyway, but if it wasn't for HMV who knows where i could have ended up!

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