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how to remove this spot

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OutOfFocus4
19 Jul 2012 - 8:17 AM

dsc-0048.jpg there seems to be a black spot on the lens or smthg which i cant remove any idea what it is..i just bought the camera.... the spot is on the left side of the watch...
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19 Jul 2012 - 8:17 AM

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rhol2
rhol2 e2 Member 3286 forum postsrhol2 vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
19 Jul 2012 - 8:25 AM

What's the camera make and model? Looks like dust on the sensor.

ST
ST  226 forum posts United Kingdom
19 Jul 2012 - 8:28 AM

The spot may be on the camera sensor rather than the lens. Often refered to as dust bunnies. DSLR Sensors can be cleaned by the user with plenty of how to videos on the web. If its a compact camera then they are not as easy for the user to clean as you have to dismantle the camera to get to the image sensor. IHTH.

You could remove the spot from the image using a software

OutOfFocus4
19 Jul 2012 - 8:30 AM


Quote: What's the camera make and model? Looks like dust on the sensor.

nikon D5100

arnieg
arnieg  10682 forum posts England
19 Jul 2012 - 8:37 AM

bunnie-gone.jpg
dust bunnie sorted

Last Modified By arnieg at 19 Jul 2012 - 8:39 AM
OutOfFocus4
19 Jul 2012 - 8:40 AM


Quote:

using a software would only be a temporary solution to this ...... is there any way i can clean it... i am considering returning the camera ang geting another one Tongue

Gaucho
Gaucho e2 Member 122228 forum postsGaucho vcard United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
19 Jul 2012 - 8:42 AM

This usually works

ST
ST  226 forum posts United Kingdom
19 Jul 2012 - 8:46 AM

Dust is a problem with cameras with interchangable lens arrangements. So changing your Nikon D5100 is probably not the answer. If you bought your camera from a good retailer they may have the ability to clean the sensor for you. The dust blower suggested by Gaucho is one of the options for cleaning dudt from sensors. Remember to have the caamera facing down when/if you deccide to try and blow the dust off the sensor.

Last Modified By ST at 19 Jul 2012 - 8:48 AM
franken
franken e2 Member 113096 forum postsfranken vcard Wales4 Constructive Critique Points
19 Jul 2012 - 8:47 AM


Quote: This usually works

I agree and I've been using one in combination with an Arctic butterfly for about six years or so now. No point in returning the camera and getting another as the replacement will just as prone to dust spots.

Ken

User_Removed
19 Jul 2012 - 8:49 AM

Yeah even if you change now you'll probably get the problem in the future, may as well learn how to clean sensor.

ST
ST  226 forum posts United Kingdom
19 Jul 2012 - 8:49 AM

I must check my smelling before posting Wink

mikehit
mikehit  56296 forum posts United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
19 Jul 2012 - 8:54 AM

Do you have any other lenses? If the mark is there with the other lens(es) as well, it is definitely on the sensor.

Yes, you can clean the sensor itselfand your manual will explain how to open the mirror to enable you to do so. My preferred method is first a soft haired brush, then something like a lenspen. Only after that would I consider a wet clean.
But you will find many, many different opinions on this topic.

User_Removed
19 Jul 2012 - 10:41 AM


Quote: using a software would only be a temporary solution to this ...... is there any way i can clean it... i am considering returning the camera ang geting another one Tongue

Why?

Sensor dust is a perpetual problem with any dSLR. Get another one and you will just be starting again.

It wasn't nearly as big a problem with film SLRs because, put simply, every exposure was on a fresh "sensor".

Dust on or inside the lens does not cause so many problems - but that, too, is unavoidable. Every time you zoom or focus a lens you are changing its internal air volume and dusty air gets sucked in as sure as God made little apples.

Apart from occasionally cleaning the sensor (I use the Arctic Butterfly because I don't trust myself to splosh cleaning solutions about inside my camera) most of us simply reconcile ourselves to having to clone out the dust bunnies from (especially) the skies of images intended for exhibitions or competitions. It's one of those digital photography facts of like.

Last Modified By User_Removed at 19 Jul 2012 - 10:42 AM
discreetphoton
discreetphoton Site Moderator 93451 forum postsdiscreetphoton vcard United Kingdom20 Constructive Critique Points
19 Jul 2012 - 11:05 AM

It's unlikely that the retailer would offer an exchange for this. Get yourself an Arctic Butterfly. They may seem expensive, but they're worth the outlay and fix 90% of problems without fuss. Trying to do a wet clean on a brand new camera is not a good idea, as you're likely to wipe lubricant all over the sensor.
Admittedly this one's pretty big, but you will always have dust spots on your sensor. It's just something you come to terms with, as some of them are microscopic and you can't remove some without adding others.
One last tip: Don't ever try to clean out your camera by blowing into it. One member here tried that after eating an egg mayonnaise sandwich and caused more harm than good!

mikehit
mikehit  56296 forum posts United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
19 Jul 2012 - 11:17 AM

I hope he got a good dressing down.

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