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Hyperfocal or not?

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    MiqsPix
    MiqsPix  341 forum posts United Kingdom
    10 Jan 2014 - 2:44 PM

    My colleague and myself have a disagreement over the principle of hyperfocal photography. He insists that he takes hyperfocal images with his Sony Alpha a7R because he manually focuses. I agree that his images seem sharp front to back but his camera is as I understand is a "point and shoot!" Is hyperfocal photography possible with this camera or must you have a DSLR with adjustable lens. I have checked his exif data and there is no reference to aperture settings only an exposure number which made me suspicious.

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    rogerfry
    rogerfry e2 Member 9509 forum postsrogerfry vcard United Kingdom
    10 Jan 2014 - 3:00 PM

    Don't let the a7R hear you call it a "point and shoot"......you'll hurt it's feelings! Suggest you read the review on here.

    sherlob
    sherlob e2 Member 82332 forum postssherlob vcard United Kingdom125 Constructive Critique Points
    10 Jan 2014 - 3:15 PM

    If your friends images are sharp front to back then he is likely setting the right focus point into his camera for depth of field to be maximised at whatever aperture he is using. In short - he is using hyperfocal focusing.

    In my experience hyperfocal focusing is one of those principles that can be good to know about, but should be applied with caution. E.g. I have an app on my phone that tells me the hyperfocal range for any aperture and focusing distance - however - usually this requires me to guess the position of the focus ring when manually focusing because the scale on the lens is insufficient to allow me the precision needed. More often than not I find that focusing on an object on the lower third of the screen (or just below), at an aperture of f16 or smaller will give me the result I want. The only time I feel inclined to use the app is when I drop below f16, and then I usually find I guestimate!

    MiqsPix
    MiqsPix  341 forum posts United Kingdom
    10 Jan 2014 - 5:35 PM

    Ok and thanks for all the replies. After some research I accept that I have been underestimating his camera as I have never seen it up close. It's actually quite a good camera and Sony are bringing out more lenses. So I guess I'll have to apologise!


    Quote: If your friends images are sharp front to back then he is likely setting the right focus point into his camera for depth of field to be maximised at whatever aperture he is using. In short - he is using hyperfocal focusing.

    In my experience hyperfocal focusing is one of those principles that can be good to know about, but should be applied with caution. E.g. I have an app on my phone that tells me the hyperfocal range for any aperture and focusing distance - however - usually this requires me to guess the position of the focus ring when manually focusing because the scale on the lens is insufficient to allow me the precision needed. More often than not I find that focusing on an object on the lower third of the screen (or just below), at an aperture of f16 or smaller will give me the result I want. The only time I feel inclined to use the app is when I drop below f16, and then I usually find I guestimate!

    ..and agree with all that!

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