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I despair about sharpness


31 Mar 2013 1:23PM
Alternatively you were shivering a bit with the cold, or perhaps take a little more water with it?GrinGrin The upload process here never helps.

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SlowSong e2
6 4.8k 29 England
31 Mar 2013 1:30PM
I took this one about half an hour later which looks much better. I think perhaps the log was not a good subject and the light wasn't good.
I cropped the centre of this image and before resizing for the website you could read every word of the small black writing. Once resized though only the larger black words were legible, and very pixellated. I'm expecting too much I think.

img-7003-resized.jpg



And you might be right Chris - cold and slightly non compos mentis might be the reason. Grin
31 Mar 2013 2:10PM
Just a thought, I don't resize, I just throw the whole file at the site and let it resample.
Jestertheclown
6 6.6k 242 England
31 Mar 2013 2:52PM

Quote: I just throw the whole file at the site and let it resample.

That's not a cunning plan, although it is the easiest way to do it and if you're happy with the results, then obviously it works for you.
Personally, I prefer to know what's been done to my images before I upload them. Things like final sharpening, which can affect contrast, for example.
I'm not sure what Epz. actually do to your work before it appears on here but there's been a thread on this subject before in which a few people expressed their concerns.
31 Mar 2013 3:23PM
Brendan, I am assuming the available space is square, so how many pixels square do I have to play with?
GlennH 9 1.9k 1 France
31 Mar 2013 3:46PM
'Live Mode' on the 60D has a tendency to be inaccurate, for whatever reason, whereas 'Quick Mode', which uses phase detection AF (like the optical viewfinder), is more dependable. Canon seem to refer to this problem somewhat ambiguously in the manual:

Quote:If you autofocus in the Live mode’s normal view and then magnify the image, the focus might be off.


Not sure if this simply means that Live Mode is wholly unreliable, or that you should first magnify the image for greater accuracy. Manual focusing swerves the whole issue, which is what Canon advise for greater accuracy.
Jestertheclown
6 6.6k 242 England
31 Mar 2013 4:50PM

Quote:I am assuming the available space is square, so how many pixels square do I have to play with?

Hi Chris,

I'd assume the idea of basing your upload on a square, or part thereof, would be correct.

As far as I know,there is no limit to the file size the days; it's just the physical dimensions that you need to get right.

1000px. on the longest side if you're E2 and 600px. on the longest side if you're not.

Bren.
31 Mar 2013 5:18PM
Thanks Bren. So 600 pixels max in the x or y then for the next upload.
Chris
Here is a simple video I shot on how to hold and shoot with a camera to minimize camera shake. Try to shoot at 1/60th of a second shutter speed or higher if possible. 1/250th or higher is the optimal speed for shooting more crisp images. Add image stabilization and you will get
Sharper images. Shoot Sharper images

Happy Shooting!
SlowSong e2
6 4.8k 29 England
31 Mar 2013 9:43PM
No!!! - fingers, keep away from the keyboard!!! Grin
Jestertheclown
6 6.6k 242 England
31 Mar 2013 10:24PM
Oh!

Go on Chris . . .
Oh---I get it. Ill pull my video and spare your pain.
31 Mar 2013 11:16PM

Quote:'Live Mode' on the 60D has a tendency to be inaccurate, for whatever reason, whereas 'Quick Mode', which uses phase detection AF (like the optical viewfinder), is more dependable. Canon seem to refer to this problem somewhat ambiguously in the manual:
If you autofocus in the Live mode’s normal view and then magnify the image, the focus might be off.

Not sure if this simply means that Live Mode is wholly unreliable, or that you should first magnify the image for greater accuracy. Manual focusing swerves the whole issue, which is what Canon advise for greater accuracy.


It means that when you focus automatically (not by hand) in live view, then magnify the image - camera well may choose some different target to focus on. This happens because camera looks, but does not see. What matters to it is just the most contrast thing in the image - that will be the primary focusing target. The same thing happens to us when we use strong magnification. Field of flowers and one flower petal will need different focusing for sure. Nothing wrong with 60D's live view focusing in principle, it's just the manual only covers the basics.
GlennH 9 1.9k 1 France
31 Mar 2013 11:54PM
In my experience the 60D's Live Mode is poor, even if theoretically it shouldn't be. It seems to yield inferior results whether I use it in 'normal view' or zoomed in. Some agreement with that exists here , although the author of the article seems to erroneously believe that Live Mode is inherently less accurate - that ought not to be the case since it uses contrast detection AF.

When I initially realised this it was with Canon 'L' series lenses; last time I tried it was with a Tamron zoom lens. Perhaps the lens needs to be a relatively recent Canon model before the function works well? Regardless, when I use Live View now I stick to manual focusing or Quick Mode. I figured this might be the root cause of Chris's problem? Similar problems have occasionally been reported with the 7D.
1 Apr 2013 3:01AM
It is really hard to find in-depth information on DSLR camera focusing technologies. Looks like it is still well guarded from competitors. My personal observation is that the area (spot size) of the image that camera uses for determining accurate focus distance may vary between models, and even between camera modes. I tried to determine it for my Canons and found it to be pretty large. What I did, I tried to focus on some contrast object on a bland wall. While the camera could barely focus on the wall itself, it picked up the contrasty thing. I think that when the focusing spot is quite big, camera has a chance to pick up a contrasty edge of an object that has some depth - thus making much of the object not sharp. This can be countered with larger depth of field (tighter aperture) or by manual focusing - which I really recommend for arts photography. Happy snaps cannot be spoiled by Quick Mode anyway - unless the camera or lens is desperately bad.

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