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I'm Mad Mad Mad


23 Jul 2013 12:29AM
Hmmm Had a look and can't find any way to adjust my comments ? I was thinking of maybe being less confrontational, then I thought "Why bother?" Goodbye folks. It's been OK here for several years, maybe the best photo forum around, but I'm gone.

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saltireblue e2
4 4.3k 26 Norway
23 Jul 2013 6:48AM

Quote:Where's my post gone? About being totally politically incorrect and telling them all to F**K O*F?
Is EPZ censoring my posts? If that's the case, EPZ can F**K O*F along with the rest of them.



You have been her long enough to know that it is unacceptable to post the words, and can hardly be surprised to have had the posts deleted.
You know very well obscene language is not accepted on the forums.

Malc
779HOB 2 1.1k United Kingdom
23 Jul 2013 7:00AM
To be honest I can't see the problem with showing them the images. You of course had the right to take the images and to also not show them if you don't want to. However, by not showing them you are making it worse. They will think there's something to hide. If they are on FB then they can see them anyway I guess.
monstersnowman 9 1.7k 1 England
23 Jul 2013 7:33AM
Why should he? If we become accustomed to having to show our images to any accusing tom, **** or harry, and the fact that if you refuse to show your images you therefore have something to hide do you feel he should be morally cohersed by members of the public to examine his memory card to avoid the automatic assumption that he is a deviant? And if he has some images of children or women (some women scantily clad but in a state they are happily willing to walk around in public) would he then be suspected unreasonably of being a deviant because they are there .. The police don't have this power to demand views of images so why on earth should paranoid idiots? By saying if you don't show all you are somehow suggesting some implied guilt or at least making things difficult through lack of cooperation is undermining a cornerstone of freedom, liberty and justice. Be careful to thoughtlessly ignore some important freedoms lest you regret them when they are not there.
779HOB 2 1.1k United Kingdom
23 Jul 2013 7:44AM
Because it avoids conflict in this case. There's no reason not to show them. By not showing them it reinforces the perception that we are all up to no good and does more harm than good. The more people hide behind freedoms the more likely those freedoms are to be taken away. If I have taken a photo that I was legally allowed to take and then say the police or someone kicked up I would of course defend my rights. But if asked to show images on my camera and I have time I can't see the problem. The problem would come if I was asked to delete them, then they would see a different side to me.
peterjones 12 4.0k 1 United Kingdom
23 Jul 2013 7:47AM
Although we have become a paranoid nation and one of the results being that it is sometimes inadvisable to take pictures of children at least deliberately AFAIK there is nothing illegal in taking images of children in a public place; ignore the stupid women, if they become a nuisance then you may have to take action via your company's grievance procedure.

G'luck, Peter.
779HOB 2 1.1k United Kingdom
23 Jul 2013 7:57AM

Quote:Although we have become a paranoid nation


This is the problem and we also have a prime minister that will jump on any bandwagon he can. Therefore, the more photographers jump up and down and stomp their little feet about their rights not to show images the more likely someone like the Daily Mail will grab the moment and before you know it the right to take images in public of people will go. Like the right to view porn on the net that you could buy in a shop legally. Will be interesting to see how that new law effects the EPZ gallery too thinking about it. EPZ could find itself blocked top people unless they have said they want to see porn.
MrGoatsmilk 6 1.5k England
23 Jul 2013 8:07AM
Complain to your workplace as you are being harassed at work.
monstersnowman 9 1.7k 1 England
23 Jul 2013 8:22AM

Quote:There's no reason not to show them. By not showing them it reinforces the perception that we are all up to no good and does more harm than good. The more people hide behind freedoms the more likely those freedoms are to be taken away.


Quite the opposite. Your clear inference here is that if you show them it shows you have nothing to hide ergo if you exercise your right not to show them you must therefore have something to hide. If you show when you don't have to because you have nothing to hide then the one time you decide not to show then this positively reinforces the fact that on this occasion you therefore MUST have something to hide. The more you ignore your reasonable rights the more these rights are forgotten and ignored. Standing up for your freedom and rights is less likely to cause them to be taken away than foregoing them is to see them becoming ineffectual or unimportant and deemed not necessary.
23 Jul 2013 8:24AM

Quote:Where's my post gone? About being totally politically incorrect and telling them all to F**K O*F?
Is EPZ censoring my posts? If that's the case, EPZ can F**K O*F along with the rest of them.

You have been her long enough to know that it is unacceptable to post the words, and can hardly be surprised to have had the posts deleted.
You know very well obscene language is not accepted on the forums.

Malc



Quite right Malc, totally out of order on my part. Sorry. Blush
779HOB 2 1.1k United Kingdom
23 Jul 2013 8:50AM

Quote: Standing up for your freedom and rights is less likely to cause them to be taken away than foregoing them is to see them becoming ineffectual or unimportant and deemed not necessary.


That also is true. I think the best advice in this thread is to tell them to call the police if they think something dodgy has gone on. The police will tell them to bug off I would have thought.
Gillygems 3 32 United Kingdom
23 Jul 2013 9:18AM
When my son takes part in disabled sporting events (from grassroots to internationals - he's in national squad) , there is generally a form to sign at the organisers desk in which I give my name and address and sign to take photos. All players have signed on their entry form that they give permission for photos to be taken. I've never come across an athlete who has refused permission. I don't know if there was a clause on the charity entry form asking entrants to give permission for pics to be taken but it would be worth asking the troublemakers to check what they signed. Interestingly, they seemed to have picked on you, and there would have been many people taking pics at the event. Sounds as though they are picking on you for whatever reason they can.
Gundog 1 624 Scotland
23 Jul 2013 10:20AM
My sympathies are entirely with the OP - on a whole range of levels.

But just a wee word of caution if the situation escalates any farther - a "public park" is not normally a public place within the meaning of the law. It is a private place (often owned by the local council) to which the public have conditional access. Not the same thing. But, unless the owner stipulated that photography is not allowed or an employee of the owner tells you to stop taking photographs, I see no reason to suspect that you have done wrong. Just don't use the "public place" argument in your defence if it comes to that.
thewilliam 6 4.8k
23 Jul 2013 10:36AM
In these hard times, it's unwise to antagonize one's employer. In most organizations, the next round of redundancy is never far away and as I learned the hard way, it doesn't take much to get ourselves on the hit-list.

In your position, I'd just post something on the company notice board that explains that, due to complaints received, you've decided to delete all pictures taken at the event. You decide whether you really do delete and whether you name the complainers.
conrad 10 10.9k 116
23 Jul 2013 10:41AM

Quote:In these hard times, it's unwise to antagonize one's employer.


True, but it was a pair of colleagues who complained, and I wonder if the employer really thinks this is a problem if the matter is explained properly.

I myself would be more interested in showing my employer and my colleagues that I didn't do anything wrong, rather than posting a message which might suggest that I had done wrong and tried to resolve the matter by deleting the photos.

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