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I still haven't got "the" lens

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MikeRC
MikeRC e2 Member 93489 forum postsMikeRC vcard United Kingdom
19 Oct 2012 - 11:41 AM

Hi......I am considering buying a "Canon EF 70-200mm F/2.8 L IS II USM Lens" 1724
....and useing it on a s/h 50D possibly bought on EPZ classifieds.
I have a 2x Canon converter (bought in error) which I intend useing to give me 400mm.

The Canon 70-200 lens is listed as Full Frame.
How will this combination work when taking shots of birds in flight ?

...or...would I be wiser sticking with my Nikon D7000 and buying the Nikon 70-200 2.8 VR ? + the 2x converter.

....the fact that the Nikon may be a better camera has little bearing on things.

...simple answers please...sadly I missed the queue for brains.

....many thanks....Mike

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19 Oct 2012 - 11:41 AM

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thewilliam
19 Oct 2012 - 12:04 PM

There's a stong family resemblance within a marque so a regular Nikon use will quickly get used to a new model. Canon cameras are different in lens-mount and handling. This means that you won't be able to use the lenses from one on the other and when you need to act quickly to get that special shot, there's a danger of fumbling.

Unless you have a compelling reason to change, stick with the marque you're using.

A few years back, one good friend took up photography and found that he wasn't getting the shots he wanted so he changed his kit, not once but several times. Over the course of a year, he had comprehensive outfits of Nikon, Canon, Leica R and Bronica GS. Each change cost him a great deal of money. When he expressed an interest in Hasselblad, his wife was very relieved when I offered to lend him one of mine. He couldn't get those special shots with a Hasselblad either!

cheddar-caveman
19 Oct 2012 - 12:45 PM

Ahhhhh! In my humble opinion zoom lenses and extenders (multipliers) just don't work. You'll find it very difficult to get consistent focus. If you want 400mm and are prepared to spend that sort of money, get the Canon 300mm f4 and a 1.4 extender.

User_Removed
19 Oct 2012 - 1:07 PM

Mike I reckon you bought the Canon converter thinking it would let you use Canon lenses on your Nikon. Owning that isn't a good enough reason to change brand.

The Canon 2.8 is a rave lens of course and does wildlife successfully with a converter. Did you see this thread? Maybe talk to those guys?

StuartAt
StuartAt e2 Member 91031 forum postsStuartAt vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
19 Oct 2012 - 1:11 PM

There is a review of converters in this month's Advanced Photographer. The Nikon ones come out very well, and paired with the 70-200 2.8 VR would suggest a winning combination. As has been said, I'd be tempted to stick with same marque as you are familiar with the handling already.

User_Removed
19 Oct 2012 - 2:22 PM

If you already have a Nikon D7000, why on Earth would you consider buying a secondhand Canon 50D.

The Nikkor 70-200mm VRll lens is a superb optic and it actually costs slightly less than the Canon equivalent.

However, for bird photography, I have both the Nikkor 70-200mm VRll and a Sigma 150-500mm OS. If I need more than 200mm, I would use the Sigma in preference to the Nikkor plus a teleconverter.

.

Carrera_c
Carrera_c  5254 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
19 Oct 2012 - 2:32 PM

Keep in mind that the DX sensor already gives you around 300mm(FX) with the D7000. I wouldn't go for a x2 converter, the doubler's tend to ruin the quality of the lens and make focusing difficult. Most I'd go for would be a x1.4. I'd stick with the Nikon and try either the Sigma 150-500mm or the 70-200mm with the x1.4

MikeRC
MikeRC e2 Member 93489 forum postsMikeRC vcard United Kingdom
19 Oct 2012 - 3:20 PM


Quote: Unless you have a compelling reason to change, stick with the marque you're using.

...more and more I'm thinking this's the way to go...but I've got to be sure.


Quote: get the Canon 300mm f4 and a 1.4 extender.

.....thanks but I want a zoom, not a prime


Quote: If you already have a Nikon D7000, why on Earth would you consider buying a secondhand Canon 50

....a member claimed that he got frame filling bird / flight shots at 70mm useing a Canon 70-200 lens.
.......suspect that he was winding me up....I get that a lot Smile

....many thanks all...much obliged.....Mike

StuartAt
StuartAt e2 Member 91031 forum postsStuartAt vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
19 Oct 2012 - 5:34 PM

70mm is 70mm on any equivalent platform (although different between crop and full frame). Swapping one crop sensor for a different make crop sensor won't extend the reach of the lens. I suspect the way to fill the frame with a bird using a 70mm lens would be to get a tame bird and get very close to it!

Carabosse
Carabosse e2 Member 1139395 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
19 Oct 2012 - 5:53 PM


Quote: 70mm is 70mm on any equivalent platform (although different between crop and full frame).

The magnification depends on the image capture area. The focal length may stay the same, but the picture recorded certainly doesn't, as between different-sized sensors.

Not quite clear what you are saying here.

mikehit
mikehit  56297 forum posts United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
19 Oct 2012 - 6:24 PM


Quote: Swapping one crop sensor for a different make crop sensor won't extend the reach of the lens.

Some will say that it does depending on the pixel density. If a bird covers one quarter of the sensor then on a modern camera that could be 4MP, on an older body it may be only 2 MP. So in theory the newer body has more 'detail' that will withstand cropping. This will be limited by the amount of noise.

mikehit
mikehit  56297 forum posts United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
19 Oct 2012 - 6:28 PM


Quote: The focal length may stay the same, but the picture recorded certainly doesn't,

If you define the 'image capture area' as the sensor, then given a specific focal length and a fixed viewing position, the size of a bird's eye will be the same on all sensors whether a 6MP APS-C or 30MP full frame.
Any discussoin after that neeeds to be qualified as to whether you are talking about viewing at 100%, printing to a fixed size, the extent you want to crop etc etc

Nick_w
Nick_w e2 Member 73840 forum postsNick_w vcard England99 Constructive Critique Points
19 Oct 2012 - 6:37 PM

Mike why not go for a s Sigma 120-300, or the 100-300 with a 1.4tc (which you used to own) rather than swapping systems for one lens? After all the size of the Canon cropped sensor is almost the same as Nikon.

You lose a lot in terms of quality with a x2, not to mention af performance irrespective of system.

lawbert
lawbert  71701 forum posts England15 Constructive Critique Points
19 Oct 2012 - 7:58 PM


Quote:

....a member claimed that he got frame filling bird / flight shots at 70mm useing a Canon 70-200 lens.
.......suspect that he was winding me up....I get that a lot Smile

Hello Mike

A frame filling shot of a bird at 70mm is more than likely whether the 70-200 is Canon or Nikon.

It is however a planned shot knowing where the bird will be...Like your fabulous Puffin shots.. You knew where the birds were and you went there and nailed them.

I use my 100mm macro for small bird inflights as do others but we are bolted to tripods and we know where the bird will be...there is a huge faliure rate tho...you can spend a day and get only one half tidy pic.

I think you should stick with what you have personally and not look into spending money you dont need to.

Post processing (photoshop and noise reduction programs etc) can play a huge part in making an image look as you want it to.

The critique gallery is great for this.....Look at the help I got

Realisticly Mike there is no such thing as "the lense"...they are all a trade off in certain areas unless you have mega money.

Time , and understanding of your subjects behaviour will reward you more than any Camera or Lens CombinationWink

StuartAt
StuartAt e2 Member 91031 forum postsStuartAt vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
19 Oct 2012 - 8:03 PM

I think I'll get my coat Tongue

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