Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


PRIZES GALORE! Enter The ePHOTOzine Exclusive Christmas Prize Draw; Over £10,000 Worth of Prizes! Plus A Gift For Everybody On Christmas Day!

Image release to be used by major photographic industry advertising agency


skewey 8 31 England
19 Nov 2012 8:16PM
Hi I have been approached by a advertising agency.Their customer is a leading Camera manafacturer and they would like to use my image on their advertising campaign across Europe.They have said they will credit me with my name on all the adverts .But I have set up a Not for profit company and would like to approach this company for either some sort of sponsorship or trialing new equipment.I know the kudos of having a image used and credited to me is great.But I feel that they are getting paid to produce the advert so some assistance with equipment or some monetary reward would help keep the wolves away from thedoor.Am I over stepping the mark here.

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

19 Nov 2012 8:58PM
No, i dont think you are.

One of my images was used by an advertising agency for a major international charity, and i was happy to let that be used for free (they also credited me), but when it comes to an image being used to promote a product where both the manufacturer and the agency will be making profit, i think its only fair to be rewarded in some way for them using your work.

You dont get if you dont ask Smile
User_Removed 7 736 4
19 Nov 2012 9:37PM
You both need to get some professional guidance on fees in both cases. A credit is mandatory and NOT payment.

Paul - the advertising agency will have been paid (even if Pro Bono i.e. at cost, the staff haven't taken a pay cut) and the staff at the charity are also paid. If you want to donate to a charity, do it out of earned income and don't help drive the entire market down for professional photographers, who need to pay for their business equipment with their turnover.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
19 Nov 2012 9:59PM
There`s no such thing as a not for profit company, even charities make some kind of profit, make sure you get paid.
Jestertheclown 6 6.6k 242 England
19 Nov 2012 10:01PM

Quote:If you want to donate to a charity, do it out of earned income

By not asking for, or accepting payment, your earned income (that you don't collect) becomes that donation.
I think that giving away one image is hardly going to drive down the entire market for professional photographers.
skewey 8 31 England
19 Nov 2012 10:12PM
By Not for Profit it means that you can earn a wage but but all other profits go back into the community.The company only as Limited Share Value.Yes I would like payment for the use of the image either by cash or product t,either wayit does not bring down the trade of professional photographers.Sponsorship is the same as income just worded different.
thewilliam 6 4.9k
19 Nov 2012 11:39PM
When I won the "Kodak Portrait Photographer of the year for UK & Ireland" title a few years back, one of the entry conditions was that Kodak could use the image ad lib. There was no payment but both photographer and customer won a very nice prize.

Kodak used the image very responsibly and each repro carried a credit.
muzzeyman 10 293 United Kingdom
20 Nov 2012 12:09AM
@Jestertheclown, I would have to disagree with you there. If we all start giving our work away for free, then yes it does drive down the market.

Why buy a loaf of bread, if Mrs Bun up the road is happy to make one and and give it away for free.

As has been said, the PR company will have been paid, so why shouldn't the creator of the image get paid? After all the camera that captured the image didn't come free, nor the card the image was recorded onto.


Credits do not pay bills nor put food on the table.


Would a wedding dress designer give her designs away for free? I think not. "Skewey" If you want to give away your work for free then that is your right. But when you find that your image may have earned the company x amount of pounds, then you may just regret not selling the images plus respective rights and made some money that you can invest in some new kit or donate you a chosen charity.

For far too long now, our profession has been getting eroded away in one way shape or form. Take the beeb for instance. How many times have you read a breaking news story and at the end of it read "Were/are you at the scene? send us your pics or stories....." Where once a journalist would have been paid to get the story, the beeb are happy for joe public to provide the story or pics FOR FREE!!!!

If Andy Dippie is still a member here then ask him how many good experienced cameramen have been axed over the last few years
DT01 5 69
20 Nov 2012 12:38AM
Similar scenario, interesting outcome.

http://www.petapixel.com/2012/08/21/thi taPixel%29
Jestertheclown 6 6.6k 242 England
20 Nov 2012 7:56AM

Quote:If we all start giving our work away for free, then yes it does drive down the market.

That's tue enough but it hinges on those words 'if we all start.'
I'm not suggesting that everyone should give their work away but I find it hard to believe that a few people being sufficiently generous to donate the odd photograph will cause the photographic industry to grind to a halt.
The comparison with Mrs. Bun's bread is an interesting one. If she was giving away something that I'd have to pay for elsewhere and it was of a similar quality, I'd take her freebie every time.

If we were honest enough to tell the truth, we'd all do the same.
thewilliam 6 4.9k
20 Nov 2012 9:14AM
[quote
Why buy a loaf of bread, if Mrs Bun up the road is happy to make one and and give it away for free.




When large-scale food aid is given to a country in crisis, one effect is to destroy the rural economy because farmers need to be able to sell their produce. As they used to say, you never get owt for nowt!

Can't the OP ask for a soft deal on some nice item of kit that wouldn't normally be affordable?
peterjones 12 4.0k 1 United Kingdom
20 Nov 2012 9:15AM
My own personal view is that the advertsing agency is making a profit, the leading camera manufacturer is undoubtedly making a profit; both will profit even more if they are able to garner free photographs; imagine how much it costs you in terms of equipment, time etc etc to produce an image?

If it was me I would charge them and research on the internet for rates; you may decide that the kudos of having your image published is enough payment or you may not however they may just move on to another photographer who would be delighted to see their photograph published without payment.

Just because Amateur is not synonymous with Professional it doesn't mean to say that an amateur's photographs are of any less value especially to industry; in my view an image produced by amateur photography has as much worth as one produced by a pro.

But I am peeing into the wind; photography in 2012 is massive and there are far too many people wishing to give their photogaphs away for free.

Peter.
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
20 Nov 2012 11:20AM

Quote:If you want to donate to a charity, do it out of earned income and don't help drive the entire market down for professional photographers,.


I don't think that is very good advice, Jane. On two scores:

1. Why on Earth would the OP want to make a charitable contribution out of earned income when he can help the same charity by donating the use of a photograph?

2. Once again we have this sickening implication that professional photographers have some God-given right to make a living from photography. If the market allows and they are sufficiently talented and also have the requisite business skills, then good luck to them. But if the market changes (for example by thousands of amateur photographers being absolutely delighted to see their "work" being used free-of-charge) or if they simply do not have the talent and business acumen, then why the hell should they survive in business? As times change, hundreds of previously viable and valued occupations have ceased to exist. Why should professional photographers be any different?
20 Nov 2012 11:35AM

Quote:As times change, hundreds of previously viable and valued occupations have ceased to exist. Why should professional photographers be any different?


My sentiments exactly.
20 Nov 2012 4:51PM

Quote:You both need to get some professional guidance on fees in both cases. A credit is mandatory and NOT payment.

Paul - the advertising agency will have been paid (even if Pro Bono i.e. at cost, the staff haven't taken a pay cut) and the staff at the charity are also paid. If you want to donate to a charity, do it out of earned income and don't help drive the entire market down for professional photographers, who need to pay for their business equipment with their turnover.



Please get your facts straight and understand the full picture (pardon the pun).

A credit is NOT mandatory, but is normally given (where possible)

Also, i think it is MY choice whether i allow my image to be used for free or not. My work is regularly used in advertising as well as for illustration and product art. Its my job and how i earn a living. On that particular occasion i was approached about the image in question and wasnt asked to give it up for free, but i chose to work that way as i have previously worked with the agency before and i knew they were also working on this project as a charitable one (in other words, they were also doing the charity a favour). So before you get all on edge about professional photographers losing out, well, thats also part of my profession, but i can afford to do the occasional freebies or reduced rate jobs for those organisations or events that i feel i want to help

What you may want to take in to account, however, is that the credit given lets others know who's work it is, and that can (and often does) lead to more work. So although i may not have earned whatever you insist i should have from the image use, i gave potentially gained more work (or at least had my work noticed) from it. Now, i have also sold image rights where i was paid, but credit could not be given.

So before you give all us professional photographers, artists and graphic designers a bad name, please get off the high-horse before you fall and hurt yourself

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.