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infrared photography

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    colingarrard
    8 Dec 2011 - 1:50 PM

    I'm still relatively new to 35mm photography and am looking into doing infrared photography.
    Is it possible to use an Infrared Filter with standard 35mm film; what would the effect be on a long exposure (as is done with digital)? Is IR film absolutely necessary for a 35mm camera or can this do done with the correct filter and standard film?
    Thanks for any help.

    Colin.

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    User_Removed
    8 Dec 2011 - 3:21 PM


    Quote: Is IR film absolutely necessary for a 35mm camera

    It's been a loooong time Colin but I would say undoubtedly as reciprocity failure is going to ruin the image using standard film and when taking the exposure lengths into account.

    oldblokeh
    oldblokeh  3762 forum posts United Kingdom
    8 Dec 2011 - 3:25 PM

    I seem to remember that silver halide emulsions are not sensitive to any wavelengths longer than blue, possibly green unless sensitised with a dye. I think that the dyes used for IR film are different and you will need proper IR film and an IR filter. Watch out when focussing. Older lenses used to have separate 'R' focus marks for use with infrared -- it's because of dispersion.

    gpwalton
    gpwalton  1390 forum posts
    8 Dec 2011 - 11:39 PM

    Using standard black and white film with a red filter will darken skies and increase contrast. If you use a green filter it will lighten foliage. A infrared filter on a normal black and white film is unlikely to get any results.
    However, you can buy Iford SFX film which is a black and white film that is partly into the infrared zone. Used with a dark red filter, it does give some infrared effect. It is better in sunlit scenes.

    Nick_w
    Nick_w e2 Member 73802 forum postsNick_w vcard England99 Constructive Critique Points
    9 Dec 2011 - 2:26 PM


    Quote: Is IR film absolutely necessary for a 35mm camera or can this do done with the correct filter and standard film?

    Yes it is necessary- you need a film that is sensitive to IR

    colingarrard
    9 Dec 2011 - 2:50 PM

    Thanks for all your help. I suppose the answer is no now that digital IR photography is the way forward.

    Wink Colin.

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