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Inspire me


Peter23 6 23 2
5 Nov 2011 10:42PM
So guys, I am having a real dry period with my photography and I HATE it, it's truly depressing. Let's see some brain storming, ideas for getting back your inspiration! What does everyone here do when they have a dry patch!?

Please help guys!!

Peter

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lawbert 7 1.8k 15 England
5 Nov 2011 10:50PM
I would suggest going back through your portfolio and investigate what is right and what is wrongWink

Brainstorming is a whole load of Nads and defines a simple lack of intellect and imagination on the person calling for oneTongue

No Offence Meant Of CourseTongue
Peter23 6 23 2
5 Nov 2011 10:52PM
I completely agree, I do have a massive lack on imagination and it's killing me. I just don't feel inspired. Shocking stuff. First ever for me
Jestertheclown 6 6.6k 242 England
5 Nov 2011 11:02PM
The usual response in threads like this is that you need to set yourself a challenge; do something you've never done before or aren't very good at and looking at your pf., there's no particular theme or genre that holds your interest.
So, maybe that's the answer after all. Concentrate on one specific theme or series of shots and challenge yourself to get it right.
I got a bit cheesed off a while ago and started working in B/W because I didn't know how to. It only really lasted a while, although I still do some stuff but it did serve to get me interested again.
Overread 6 3.9k 18 England
5 Nov 2011 11:14PM
I approach this in one of two ways - depending on the person.

1) Put the camera down! Yep sometimes we jump into something and just overload our system way too fast and the result is burnout; which is always a pain. So I say put the camera down, don't try to force it (because chances are even if you get good results, in a burn out you'll likely still think them poor) and just head out without it. Maybe even focus your attentions on a former or new hobby for a little while. Then before you know if you'll catch the camera bug again.

2) Projects - as said above a challenge or a project which focuses and forces your atteniton into a specific area of interest for yourself. It might not even be fully photography based, but simply involve photography at one or more stages.

I'd advise against the 365day type projects; whilst many of these start out well most quickly dissolve into random pictures of whatever is within reach of the computer (normally also in the dead of night). Thus whilst they can start out being great, unless you set yourself some strict rules to follow it will quickly break down (I'd also say that one a day is way too many - one a week and make it good).
5 Nov 2011 11:26PM

Quote:I approach this in one of two ways - depending on the person.

1) Put the camera down! Yep sometimes we jump into something and just overload our system way too fast and the result is burnout; which is always a pain. So I say put the camera down, don't try to force it (because chances are even if you get good results, in a burn out you'll likely still think them poor) and just head out without it. Maybe even focus your attentions on a former or new hobby for a little while. Then before you know if you'll catch the camera bug again.

2) Projects - as said above a challenge or a project which focuses and forces your atteniton into a specific area of interest for yourself. It might not even be fully photography based, but simply involve photography at one or more stages.

I'd advise against the 365day type projects; whilst many of these start out well most quickly dissolve into random pictures of whatever is within reach of the computer (normally also in the dead of night). Thus whilst they can start out being great, unless you set yourself some strict rules to follow it will quickly break down (I'd also say that one a day is way too many - one a week and make it good).



I agree if you love photography then take a break or look for different things to do involving photography
mikesavage e2
12 260 2 England
5 Nov 2011 11:37PM
Give it up and do something else instead. I've had a couple of these periods myself over the past 35 years. I've just got back into photography after a layoff of over 4 years & am enjoying it again.
User_Removed 10 17.9k 8 Norway
6 Nov 2011 9:29AM
CaptivePhotons 11 1.6k 2 England
6 Nov 2011 9:34AM
Come and join us in the 365 Group or in the blogs .
MikeA 10 1.2k England
6 Nov 2011 10:55AM
Surrounded by 20 acres of trees in their Autumn colours and have not taken one image yet.

Superb image Mike.
tomcat e2
9 6.2k 15 United Kingdom
6 Nov 2011 12:11PM

Quote:What does everyone here do when they have a dry patch!?


Neck half a dozen bottles of Holsten pilsWink
User_Removed 10 17.9k 8 Norway
6 Nov 2011 1:27PM
LOL!!!! - I have a can of that very brew in my hand as I type Adrian!!!
6 Nov 2011 1:36PM
You should not be drinking at this time of the day. Much too soon. Leave your start time until 2pm.Grin

If the autumn colours do not give you a kick-start, boost, then nothing will. Waiting for a cherry tree outside for its leaves to turn pink, and capture them against a clear blue sky. Why did I not do it in the last 2 years ? Because the day they were beautifully pink, along came the gales, and denuded the tree.Life can be sad at times.Wink
User_Removed 10 17.9k 8 Norway
6 Nov 2011 5:27PM

Quote:You should not be drinking at this time of the day. Much too soon. Leave your start time until 2pm.


LOL!!!

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