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779HOB
779HOB  21020 forum posts United Kingdom
19 Dec 2012 - 8:57 AM

If people are naive about how social media works then that's up to them to learn how to use then. The platforms themselves are very useful. I get all my newspaper work though Twitter, its how the commissioning editor communicates with the photographers.

I was talking with a friend last night and they were short-listing job applicants last week. One person was pretty good on paper, when they looked them up on FB they binned the application form. So people definitely need to be careful what they post.

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19 Dec 2012 - 8:57 AM

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jadus
jadus e2 Member 21006 forum postsjadus vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
19 Dec 2012 - 9:12 AM

This might be of interest..............

http://blog.instagram.com/post/38252135408/thank-you-and-were-listening

mikehit
mikehit  56475 forum posts United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
19 Dec 2012 - 9:13 AM


Quote:
I was talking with a friend last night and they were short-listing job applicants last week. One person was pretty good on paper, when they looked them up on FB they binned the application form. So people definitely need to be careful what they post.

My wife has done the same thing when interviewing. They even had someone in disciplinary process and out of interest looked on FB when claimed to have been ill - only to find he had been out and got blind drunk during that day. The idiot even tried to deny it was him!

paulcookphotography

Is it entirely ethical to look up someone's Facebook profile as a character reference?

With regards to someone being caught out by faking a sickie through Facebook posts, well, that's their own dumb luck.

Neither of which really point to social media being the evil system that its made out to be. Social media is used and abused just like any area of the Internet and modern media. It's huge benefits massively outweigh its failings, but like all things, we only focus on the 'bad press'.

Would be interesting to see how many folk found the likes of ephotozine through friends tweets and feeds. Was that such a bad thing?

wicksy
wicksy  879 forum posts United Kingdom
19 Dec 2012 - 10:13 AM

When we were looking for a new staff member we searched to see if we could find any of the applicants on Facebook twitter etc, just seems like common sense to get as full a picture as you can.

paulcookphotography

What if their profile is set to private, or if they don't have a Facebook account? Are all applicants treated equally?

oldblokeh
oldblokeh  3820 forum posts United Kingdom
19 Dec 2012 - 10:36 AM

What makes you think that an employer has a duty to treat all applicants equally? I would say that a recruiter has a duty to use publically available information to help him/her avoid hiring someone who is a liability. Typical examples have been applicants with Facebook postings publically slagging off their current employer. Would you want to employ someone who does that?

jadus
jadus e2 Member 21006 forum postsjadus vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
19 Dec 2012 - 10:36 AM

I use a pseudonym on facebook. The state knows enough about me as it is! Those who need to access that information can do.

As for potential employers, if they discovered the pseudonym and looked at my page they would be deeply disappointed - photos of snails and flowers will hardly give them anyuseful information!!!

paulcookphotography


Quote: What makes you think that an employer has a duty to treat all applicants equally? I would say that a recruiter has a duty to use publically available information to help him/her avoid hiring someone who is a liability. Typical examples have been applicants with Facebook postings publically slagging off their current employer. Would you want to employ someone who does that?

What i mean is that if you have two applicants who have very similar skills and background, and very good character references, then they are pretty much equal in standing for a job. You check one and on their facebook profile it says something that you dont like. You look and the other doesnt have a facebook account. So lets say, for talking sake, you hire the one that hasnt used facebook and find they aren't quite what you thought they were. Was that fair on the other applicant who had no way to prove themselves?

Maybe its just me, but i would say using facebook/social media as a way of checking out a potential employee is an abuse of its function. People use social media in a lot of different ways and its really hard to judge any sort of true character from that. What you are also doing is judging someone on their private life, and not on their professional capacity.

In any other form, some might see it as stalking.

oldblokeh
oldblokeh  3820 forum posts United Kingdom
19 Dec 2012 - 11:00 AM

If you make information publically available on Facebook it is equivalent to publishing it in a newspaper. I really don't see your point.

paulcookphotography

The point is how its used. Many people do not post anything about their job online, so why should their personal life/online life be taken into account. What does an employer deem relevant? Once employed, would an employer keep checking the posts of its staff, or even demand that they be added on all their social media accounts? There are rules and guidelines that employers have to follow, just as employees do. I'm just wondering what the legislation is about profiling applications

oldblokeh
oldblokeh  3820 forum posts United Kingdom
19 Dec 2012 - 11:18 AM


Quote: The point is how its used.

No, the point is about what information you publish about yourself. If you don't want the world to know about something, then don't tell the world. There is no legislation about profiling applications, nor should there be. If an applicant is foolish enough to boast about taking sickies, or to show that they will slag off their employer to all and sundry that's their lookout.

paulcookphotography

An interesting article regarding profile checks

I'm not referring to whether or not someone talks about an employer (or an employee, for that matter), but how an applicant can be misjudged, or a failed application could be seen.

Last Modified By paulcookphotography at 19 Dec 2012 - 11:30 AM
oldblokeh
oldblokeh  3820 forum posts United Kingdom
19 Dec 2012 - 11:33 AM

I think that the article you quote is very misguided. I will say again, if you don't want information about you in the public domain, then don't put it in the public domain. You use Facebook to publicise yourself/your business. If you also blogged about ripping customers off, for instance, then you couldn't legitimately complain about people using that as a basis for not touching your business with a ten foot pole.

paulcookphotography

You also have to look at how public is public?

Currently i have 160 'friends' (made up of family, friends, clients and businesses) on facebook, recently cut down from several hundred that i had added through an online game i was playing. Currently i have my wall set that anyone can see my posts, whether i have then added as a friend or not. So if i was to post something about an employer or whatever, everyone could see it.

However, i could change my settings and have it so that only those i add as a friend can see my posts (meaning, unless i added a potential employer, they would be unable to see what i said, but everyone in my group could).

The info would still be there, and still technically public as it was not in a private conversation

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