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Is 300 DPI the best for printing?


rvoller e2
3 33 United Kingdom
11 Aug 2012 4:21PM
Hi

I would like to print out my photos (at home) I have accumulated for myself, friends/family and hopefully to purchase for mainly to be framed on a wall. For this reason I better do this properly. I have a Epson A3 printer and 16MP camera.
I noticed my PSD file in photoshop is 240 DPI. Should I print them out at 300DPI? Is this the common standard?
Thanks for your help

Roger

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justin c 11 4.6k 36 England
11 Aug 2012 7:27PM
360dpi or 720dpi is the optimum for Epson printers. You can do the resampling yourself in Photoshop and then sharpen, or, you can just send the printer driver the file and let that do the resampling. The first method is widely regarded as the better choice of the two.
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
12 Aug 2012 8:34AM
ppi does not equal dpi.

Pixels are what you see on your screen; dots are what the printer applies to the paper. Quite different.
mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
12 Aug 2012 4:53PM
If you do a search on the web (as well as most photography forums) for 'printer resolution' you will find a lot of discussion on this. I have read comments by people whose opinion I would trust saying that in reality the difference between printing at 120dpi and 300 dpi is minimal or non-existent. Why 300 has become the standard, I don't know.

As LF says, make sure you know the difference between dpi and ppi in the printing dialogue box.
justin c 11 4.6k 36 England
12 Aug 2012 4:58PM

Quote:ppi does not equal dpi.

Pixels are what you see on your screen; dots are what the printer applies to the paper. Quite different.



No one has mentioned ppi, the question was asking about dpi
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
12 Aug 2012 8:40PM

Quote:ppi does not equal dpi.

Pixels are what you see on your screen; dots are what the printer applies to the paper. Quite different.

No one has mentioned ppi, the question was asking about dpi



Wow, you're edgy tonight!

I was trying to clear the apparent confusion in the OP's mind when he seemed to be muddling up the dpi of a printing process with what he called the dpi (but I assume he should have said ppi) of his computer file.

Wakey Wakey!!
justin c 11 4.6k 36 England
12 Aug 2012 8:57PM

Quote:Wow, you're edgy tonight!


Not that I've noticed Grin



Quote:I was trying to clear the apparent confusion in the OP's mind


I don't see the confusion myself. The question was very clear and simple, print at 240 dpi or 300 dpi. No mention of ppi and the only confusion comes from your answer which in fact doesn't answer the question at all and perhaps introduces confusion to what is a very straightforward question (at least for most of us anyway Grin).


Quote:Wakey Wakey!!


Wide awake thank you and just about to enjoy the Olympic closing ceremony Smile, so I'll leave you to re-read the original poster's question, again, and perhaps you'll interpret it correctly this time GrinTongue We all make mistakes Smile
newfocus e2
8 644 2 United Kingdom
12 Aug 2012 10:52PM
Not wanting to get embroiled in some kind of PPI vs DPI controversy Smile but I think LeftForum has a valid point here that seems to be important to help the OP understand how to optimise a print. What counts is how many pixels in the original image end up getting used per inch in the print. i.e. PPI, not DPI.

A 600 pixel wide image printed 2 inches wide is 300 PPI - simple as that. DPI is to do with how the printer lays down individual spots of ink on the page to blend colours and create the image, which didn't seem to be what the OP was asking.


Quote:Should I print them out at 300DPI? Is this the common standard?


300 PPI bears close inspection and most people can't see any improvement above that. You can go lower in practice for a large print viewed from a distance. Just to confuse matters, for Epson printers I generally use 360 PPI as Justin mentions because Epsons generally work better on multiples of 360 (not sure it makes as much difference these days as it once did but I feel it's worth doing still).

I hope that helps - the easy way to think of it is simply a 10" print = 3600 pixels for Epson.
Nick_w e2
7 4.1k 99 England
13 Aug 2012 7:29AM
As has been said 360ppi is what Epsom state as the ideal. However they did a demo at one of the exhibitions a while back at 180ppi and the results were indecernable to the naked eye.
rvoller e2
3 33 United Kingdom
13 Aug 2012 5:22PM
Thanks for letting me understand I should be saying PPI instead of DPI as I would be controlling this in photoshop. Mind you no one mentioned about the critical resampling tick box in PS that I understand to change the PPI correctly and don't need to mention on here as everyone thinks there experts lol. I should start with 360 ppi then perhaps do some variations for experimental use. For a tip off I heard Qimage is better than PS for preparing photos for printing larger prints.

Thanks again
mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
13 Aug 2012 8:33PM
Hang on...you don't 'print' at PPI - you print at DPI. It is the program that calculates how to convert the resolution of the electronic image (PPI) to the printer output (DPI).

PPI = Pixels per inch (the number of pixels per inch of computer screen)
DPI = dots per inch (ink dots per inch on the paper)
photofrenzy e2
8 424 2 United Kingdom
17 Aug 2012 11:35PM
I think he is refering to the actual output size of the image or File not at what resolution to print at .

I would output the image in photoshop at 300 dpi or pixels/inch that is enough for printing out at a size of A3.

However most printing on epson printers give you top quality photographic output setting the Printer driver setting to 720dpi , Forget 1440 dpi or 2880 dpi 5460 dpi your just wasting ink and wont see that much of a difference anyway.

So my advice would be to go to Image, image size (photoshop). In the Document size box see what the resolution is set to if it is 72 pixels/inch or anything other than 300 pixels/inch then change the resolution to 300 pixels/inch. Now in the pixel dimension box change the output to inches make sure the CONSTRAINT PROPORTIONS box is checked with a tick and also the RESAMPLE box also.If your printing output is A3 then set the nearest size to that format which would be 11x16. Equaly if your just printing on A4 then resize to 12x8 which is close enough for A4, If you want to be particular then 11.75x8.5 inches and so forth.

Then in printer drivers menu select the PRINTER RESOLUTION PRINTING OUTPUT to 720 dpi and print . You ahould have a top quality print Wink
rvoller e2
3 33 United Kingdom
6 Sep 2012 4:35PM
Thanks for your help, I am waiting for my Epson R3000 to arrive, can't wait. got my Epson inks, though need to do research on papers, really tempted to start with Epson papers. I heard Joe Cornish uses ultra smooth fine art, so must be good enough, though my main attraction is the 100 per cent integration and simplicity than adding foriegn printer profiles.
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
6 Sep 2012 7:52PM

Quote:Hang on...you don't 'print' at PPI - you print at DPI. It is the program that calculates how to convert the resolution of the electronic image (PPI) to the printer output (DPI).

PPI = Pixels per inch (the number of pixels per inch of computer screen)
DPI = dots per inch (ink dots per inch on the paper)



Isn't that what I said?
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
6 Sep 2012 7:54PM

Quote:Thanks for your help, I am waiting for my Epson R3000 to arrive, can't wait. got my Epson inks, though need to do research on papers, really tempted to start with Epson papers. I heard Joe Cornish uses ultra smooth fine art, so must be good enough, though my main attraction is the 100 per cent integration and simplicity than adding foriegn printer profiles.


You won't regret the decision to get the R3000.

Forget about ***** like ICC profiles and let the Epson software manage the printing.

On papers, I love Fotospeed Platinum Baryta for mono and Ilford Galerie Smooth Pearl or Glossy for colour. The Epson Smooth Lustre and Glossy settings work magic for those.

I haven't risked third party inks and find that Premier Inks are, by far, the least expensive for genuine Epson inks.


.

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