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is it illegal to photograph a dog without permission?


meyeview e2
5 731 Scotland
29 Jul 2014 9:37AM
i think people need to lighten up. what harm is there in photographing a dog?
most, responsible, dog owners are very obliging and have no qualms about allowing someone to photograph their dogs as long as it doesn't cause the animal to get stressed.
next thing will be people shouting at us for photographing flowers in their garden.

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jadus e2
3 1.0k 2 United Kingdom
29 Jul 2014 9:41AM
The irony of it was, i had just been out taking photos of a couple of dogs for some friends, they were gobsmacked at the over reaction. You're right though, how long will it be before flowers are off limits.
ade_mcfade e2
10 15.1k 216 England
29 Jul 2014 9:52AM
ask them for their email address and offer to send a couple of shots...

usually gets buy-in from them Wink
thewilliam 6 4.8k
29 Jul 2014 10:26AM
It often helps to be diplomatic. Was the pic was taken from a public road or footpath? If so, it's probably legal because even humans don't have an absolute right of privacy.

Has the dog owner gone on to make further trouble?
ade_mcfade e2
10 15.1k 216 England
29 Jul 2014 10:58AM
here's another one... act a bit dumb and try

"Oh wow - have they brought a new law out? I had no idea they'd banned photography in a public place... .tsk, whatever next. What is the law called?"

They are on the spot then... they will probably say "I don't know" or something like "Prevention of terrorism"

You can handle either of those diplomatically or aggressively... it's up to you Smile
jadus e2
3 1.0k 2 United Kingdom
29 Jul 2014 11:41AM
I handled it by simply looking at the woman as though she was daft and did not say a word. I am learning that behaving like the partially deaf person that i am sometimes has it's advantages. if i had argued with her the whole situation would have got out of hand.
mikehit e2
5 7.1k 11 United Kingdom
29 Jul 2014 12:08PM

Quote:f i had argued with her the whole situation would have got out of hand.


Yep. There is no real argument to be had in situatins like this because their response is purely emotional, not rational.
thewilliam 6 4.8k
29 Jul 2014 1:06PM

Quote:I am learning that behaving like the partially deaf person that i am sometimes has it's advantages. if i had argued with her the whole situation would have got out of hand.


Good idea. I must remember that one. I'll remove my deaf-aid and point to the battery with a sad expression on my face!
cuffit 8 187 2 England
29 Jul 2014 1:46PM
Interesting thread - which sums up (in both serious and humorous ways) the difficulties of taking photos anywhere these days. With so many people viewing my property (Google maps (apparently!), the Royal Mail under the pretext of measuring distances between road and door, the electricity people for smart meters, scrap men who think anything outside has been put there to be collected) that I do keep an eye out these days - dog theft has become an issue locally and we are out in the sticks where the community is reasonably close. So for a 1000 reasons, people are wary - for good or no reason.

This was brought home to me when I went to the next village to collect a Sunday newspaper. Walking back to my car, a dog came walking round the corner and walked backwards and forwards (the shop and houses front the street) but no sign of the owner. I waited for a few moments and tried to make my mind up whether it was one of those streetwise dogs that roams the streets at will, or whether it was loose. I decided to see if I could find someone (the lady in the shop was out of sight) so I looked at the dogs collar and found his name and the owner's mobile number. Trying to hold the dog with one hand and tapping in the number with the other hand must have been comical to watch. Bent down over the dog after 2 failed calls, the door of an adjacent house opened and the owner sees me bent over the dog. He just said 'I am the owner, it escaped from the back' and I replied 'great, I thought he was lost and I was trying to call you'. While he said thank you and I had my phone in my hand, his eyes and demeanour were not in tune with sentiment and I am sure that he, at the very least, suspected the dog was about to be lifted. Anyway, I felt I couldn't leave the dog to the road but did wonder why I bothered.

This whole topic just shows how changed this country has become where everyone is fearful to do just about anything. Perhaps the extraordinary rise of photos (on any medium) has contributed to the apparent paranoia that currently exists in UK. Spent a week in Italy recently - what a joy!
jadus e2
3 1.0k 2 United Kingdom
29 Jul 2014 2:34PM
It feels to me that what is being lost is the notion of 'innocence before proven guilty'. It seems everywhere we go we are assumed guilty of something, before even the most basic of inquiries is made. it's sad really and will come back to bite us.
petebfrance 2 1.3k United Kingdom
29 Jul 2014 2:53PM
I tried to photograph some butterflies this-morning. The ***** things would not keep still. Considering that they were trespassing in my garden and sitting on one of my plants.... actually, my daughter arrives this week complete with her new camera - I wonder if I should let her take photos on my property....
Speaking (eh?) generally about the situation that leads to this sort of thing, I think it's all a bit bonkers, really, but unfortunately the lack of 'reasonableness' seems to me come from both sides. Too many cameras in the hands of those who feel that 'their rights' are more important than other individuals' wishes for privacy (you're in a public place so you're fair game....) which have now become 'rights'.... Only the good guys like me should be allowed to have a camera / those requiring privacy should wear paper bags over their headsWinkWinkWinkWinkWink
thewilliam 6 4.8k
29 Jul 2014 3:14PM
Commonsense died some time ago and the Times printed a superb obituary. Google it.
JackAllTog e2
5 4.0k 58 United Kingdom
29 Jul 2014 3:54PM
With police being asked to wear body cameras and new items like Google glass, we are just going to have to get used to the fact that CCTV nation is growing. Often in part due to the fact that their are many out there looking to exploit a situation if no one is trusted to be honest and independent.
779HOB 2 1.1k United Kingdom
29 Jul 2014 7:10PM
I was once contacted by a teacher who told me she had just done safeguarding training and it was illegal for me to have photos of her son on my site. She said she'd call the police if I didn't remove it. I didn't and never heard from her again or the police. The son was at a fair ground and was posing for me with his friends, I was on commission for a paper at the time. I have to say I rarely get any problems from parents or anyone really about taking their photos. If I do I work out if the pic it likely to sell or not, if not I am happy to delete it, from one card anyway. The RSPCA guy who was putting a dead badger in a bag in the back of his van during the cull last summer said he didn't want me to take the photo so deleted it from one card to stop a roadside argument.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
29 Jul 2014 9:10PM

Quote:I was once contacted by a teacher who told me she had just done safeguarding training and it was illegal for me to have photos of her son on my site. She said she'd call the police if I didn't remove it. I didn't and never heard from her again or the police. The son was at a fair ground and was posing for me with his friends, I was on commission for a paper at the time. I have to say I rarely get any problems from parents or anyone really about taking their photos. If I do I work out if the pic it likely to sell or not, if not I am happy to delete it, from one card anyway. The RSPCA guy who was putting a dead badger in a bag in the back of his van during the cull last summer said he didn't want me to take the photo so deleted it from one card to stop a roadside argument.


The only time I ever had a problem was when a local paper took a picture of one of my daughters, then used it to illustrate a story about under age drinking, they even printed her full name under the picture.

She was 14 or 15 at the time at had absolutely nothing to do with the story.

The paper had breached clauses 1 and 6 of the PCC`s codes of practice.

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