Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


PRIZES GALORE! Enter The ePHOTOzine Exclusive Christmas Prize Draw; Over £10,000 Worth of Prizes! Plus A Gift For Everybody On Christmas Day!

It has been a short journey of discovery


ErictheViking e2
2 124 102 Scotland
16 Mar 2013 12:31PM
rhein-ii.jpg



This is a perfect example of someone knowing what they want and creating an image to reflect their desires of an image. I like it it has a real abstract feel to it that I find pleasing to view, however to devoted "Rule of Thirds" followers it will not be something they like.

Do you like it Tony? Why?

I love the work of Ansel Adams and he is quoted as saying "An image is not taken, an image is created." In other words the photographer decides what people see, not the camera.

Erik Grin

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

TonyCoridan 1 137 United Kingdom
16 Mar 2013 12:35PM

Quote:This is a perfect example of someone knowing what they want and creating an image to reflect their desires of an image. I like it it has a real abstract feel to it that I find pleasing to view, however to devoted "Rule of Thirds" followers it will not be something they like.

Do you like it Tony? Why?

I love the work of Ansel Adams and he is quoted as saying "An image is not taken, an image is created." In other words the photographer decides what people see, not the camera.

Erik Grin



No, I don't particularly like it; its not my style really. For me it's a boring photo taken with a smartphone...

You probably know who took it and it's financial value!

Wink Tony
blastedkane 9 66 2
16 Mar 2013 12:47PM
Tony, I have read your numerous questions with interest. At first I felt that there may be some "Trolling" however I think I came to the conclusion that you are just trying to improve your "art" which is always a good thing. I have been contemplating answering some of them, however on the whole I think that you have been given more than enough advice throughout your journey so far and therefore didn't need my input.

I think your comment to Ian

Quote:I don't know what qualification you have and I have my opinion about your PF too.

feels a little argumentative and aggressive. When either posting for critique or asking a question you have to accept that you may not like some of the answers that you are given, however all of these opinions (centered around the aesthetics of your imagery) are subjective and all viewers have their own life experience and expectations from the world of photography.

You also ask a lot of very very open ended questions without really revisiting the topic and providing your definitive opinion which makes me feel as if you are trying to adopt the "majority" opinion expressed within the answers. You mention that you have been taking pictures for a long time, however I would ask what your thoughts and opinions are. The majority of people that have been creating images "critically" for a long time will have developed their own thoughts and opinions.

Looking at that comments made by Ian i would say that it is a well rounded and measured opinion. I think that my main issue with they way that you are using the forums for training is that you have not specified your end game, what you want to achieve and where you want to take your hobby. You also, on the whole, have no exif data on the majority of your images which can make a full critique difficult.

As a portfolio I am confused. Yes there are "street images" and "candid" images, however they are all very close focussed and so the majority have no "context" which (in my unimportant opinion) is what makes a great street candid. I would also suggest that the majority seem to be a little soft, however at the size they are and without exif data it is difficult to know whether this is camera blur or focussing issues. You are using what would be classed as a professional camera and if you feel that you are not getting the most out of it then I would definitely suggest taking a short class with a local teacher or C&G in photography just to expand your knowledge and understanding of the techniques required to capture an image.

I also feel that some 1:1 time with a photographer would do you and you craft the world of good.
blastedkane 9 66 2
16 Mar 2013 12:48PM
Just as an addition why pick an image that you don't like?????????
iancrowson e2
4 211 129 United Kingdom
16 Mar 2013 12:49PM
You could start a forum thread on:
"The Value of Art."

Actually I like it, very peaceful and thought provoking. If I had it on my wall I could sit and lose myself for long periods. ( and I don't mean what I would do with the money I it were mine and I was to sell it)
ErictheViking e2
2 124 102 Scotland
16 Mar 2013 12:50PM
Hi Tony, I've actually never seen this before or have a clue who took it, but their are people out there who can sell rubbish for a fortune.

The fact I like it and you don't brings me back to what I said earlier about personal taste and likes.

Erik
TonyCoridan 1 137 United Kingdom
16 Mar 2013 12:52PM
I jus
Quote:Just as an addition why pick an image that you don't like?????????


How much would you be willing to pay for it, hypothetically?

That's not mine by the way.

Just wanted others' opinions!Wink

Tony
blastedkane 9 66 2
16 Mar 2013 12:57PM
I have yet to form an opinion on it. Is it worth $4.3 million..... not to me..... But to someone.. Obviously. If I rushed out and re took that image would that make my picture worth the same. Probably not Smile

But then what makes a shark in formaldehyde a piece of art. This is a discussion that has been running for centuries and will continue to run whilst people have their own opinions.
iancrowson e2
4 211 129 United Kingdom
16 Mar 2013 1:06PM
I would probably pay up to 175 for framed print of it if I had a bit of wall that needed filling.
By the way the person standing next to me just said "what a load of rubbish" but did I care, of course not, I like it.
Art is totally subjective.
Actually what is this to do with the thread you started.
If you are thinking of selling photos start off by having a good look at what sells and copy them. I for one would be surprised, amazed really, if someone wanted to buy most of the photos I posted on this site. (although I do sell a few)
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
16 Mar 2013 1:14PM

Quote:But then what makes a shark in formaldehyde a piece of art


Or an unmade bed . Smile
blastedkane 9 66 2
16 Mar 2013 1:17PM
I'll sell you my unmade bed for 50 quid Smile
iancrowson e2
4 211 129 United Kingdom
16 Mar 2013 1:41PM

Quote:

Looking at that comments made by Ian i would say that it is a well rounded and measured opinion.

I also feel that some 1:1 time with a photographer would do you and you craft the world of good.



Rob,
Thanks for your supportive comment. I'm new to the critique team so still finding my place. One thing some people may not realise is the critique team is made up of volunteers. In no way would I (or any other member I'm sure) claim to be a talented photographer with top skills. I know how to recognise and take a technically OK photo and for various reasons enjoy passing on what knowledge I have to others who ask for advice. All my views and opinions are mine and so are subjective.
I, for one, recognise there are many, many, far more talented photographers on site who are not team members, probably because they are too busy earning a living.

I love your website, my wife (who creates wedding cakes) just loves your photos of cakes. Great site too, I guess it was build from scratch not pro forma?
regards
Ian
jadus e2
3 1.0k 2 United Kingdom
16 Mar 2013 2:33PM
It looks to me that what ever is offered to Tony it will never be enough........

Jadus
TonyCoridan 1 137 United Kingdom
16 Mar 2013 2:41PM

Quote:I would probably pay up to 175 for framed print of it if I had a bit of wall that needed filling.
By the way the person standing next to me just said "what a load of rubbish" but did I care, of course not, I like it.
Art is totally subjective.
Actually what is this to do with the thread you started.
If you are thinking of selling photos start off by having a good look at what sells and copy them. I for one would be surprised, amazed really, if someone wanted to buy most of the photos I posted on this site. (although I do sell a few)



It actually sold for $4,338,500 (then about 2.7m); the identity of the buyer has not been revealed. Seriously!

Tony
alistairfarrugia 2 164 88 Malta
16 Mar 2013 3:14PM
Hi Tony,


Quote:Could I ask you to (since most of you have gone through my PF) tell me if you think I have an eye for the art of photography: your honest opinion, please.



First off, what is, in your opinion, the ART of photography? What would classify someone as fitting within the category of "having an eye for the art"? My 2 cents is that art is a subjective issue - some people like abstract work for instance, whilst others loathe it and prefer classic stuff. There are millionaires that pay for such art all over the world, and then there are those who denigrate this practice. Should a painting, or a photo, sell for millions? My 2 cents is, who am I to say? The price we attach to something reflects our affection and/or established appreciation towards the piece of art. If there's someone willing to pay 4.3 million for a photo by Gursky for instance, does it mean that Gursky is good and that he "has an eye for the art", or does it mean that there are people out there who appreciate his work and are willing to pay for it? It might sound like I'm reducing this a lot, but to me, it all boils down to that. You cannot please everyone all the time. Some work just captures people's hearts and minds, and some doesn't. That goes for all kind of art. When your work manages to capture people's heart and mind though, you might be transmitting something to them that is "priceless", metaphorically speaking, and for such stuff, people to tend the pay in bucketloads. After all, attaching a price to something deemed invaluable isn't an easy practice.

Now, questions 1 - 4:

Quote:
1. what do you think is good
2. what do you think is bad
3. where must I improve
4. do you think I have a particular style?



I'll answer with another question, and I might be repeating: What IS IT that you want to achieve? What message do you want to put forward? What emotions do you wish to convey to the viewer? Before you express this, it would be presumptuous of us to say this is good or this bad, at least in terms of subject matter. What I can comment upon is technique though, and that relates to your 5th question too.

5. what do you think of taking photo of 'beautiful woman' on the street (some are portraiture format). Just to add many of the people I take photo of I do go and talk to then afterward; sometimes they pose for more photos, but I don't upload posed photos as I prefer candid expression.

I would personally not classify taking street photos with a long-zoom as street photography proper. To me street photography should have more context in the picture, and the person would be interacting or reacting to the context around him/her. Just presenting portraits taken from far off is more akin to candid portraiture and I can see why people compared this to voyeurism rather than street photography. I would personally not like it if a stranger was zooming in on my face with a long lens. It would make me feel as if I was being spied upon. I do understand that it is not ILLEGAL, and I agree one has every right to do so if that's the law, however it's not just what's legal/illegal that makes people feel comfortable or uneasy - it's also what people feel is appropriate that affects us. I think for most, being shot without prior permission with a long-zoom lens from far away would seem inappropriate and bordering on invasion of privacy. Regardless of it being legal, it wouldn't be appreciated in the first place.

And on this last point, I shall conclude my statement and tie with my earlier comment - appreciation. I do like some of your pictures, but I also feel a bit concerned and uneasy watching them, as they feel a bit too intimate and close for me to feel like I'm taking in the person and the context: I'm merely taking in the person. Seeing them up-close. And I don't think the mood that puts me in is particularly positive. I admit it feels like I'm intruding when I see some of your pictures. Could be just me though! Wink

When it comes to candid shots, I prefer to go for images that show some sort of interaction or behaviour that is universal. That way, the picture is less about the person (typical portrait) and more about the behaviour (ergo, the mood put forward). I have a couple of pictures in my portfolio that I will now link to and I'll ask you to let me know what you think of it. I'm confident that we might agree to disagree on whether these are good or bad, and I will understand it 100% if you don't like my work. It would simply prove my earlier point that after all, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. You can't please everyone all the time, but just make sure that your work always pleases you. If it does, and others like it too, then you have the art of transmitting a good feeling to someone else, and that transcends the art of photography - whatever that means to you.

These are some of the images where my focus isn't the person, but the action/behaviour that has a sort of universal theme:
http://www.ephotozine.com/user/alistairfarrugia-208361/showcase/photo/father-and-son-31150372

http://www.ephotozine.com/user/alistairfarrugia-208361/gallery/photo/motherly-love-32687900

http://www.ephotozine.com/user/alistairfarrugia-208361/album/candids-7057/photo/i-can-t-see-anything---31176416

And this is my candid's album.
http://www.ephotozine.com/user/alistairfarrugia-208361/album/candids-7057

By all means, I do not want to imply that this is good work. It's just my work. I like it. Some others do too, and some don't. And I'm perfectly fine with that. I also think I still have a ton of work to do to improve in this department. I'm simply providing these links to further stimulate discussion on candid work and explain my point better. What do you think?

Good luck with your work!

Alistair

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.