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StrayCat
StrayCat e2 Member 1014808 forum postsStrayCat vcard Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
14 Apr 2014 - 8:01 PM

http://www.slice.ca/health/blog/5-foods-that-fight-the-signs-of-aging/58488/

Last Modified By StrayCat at 14 Apr 2014 - 8:02 PM
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14 Apr 2014 - 8:01 PM

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MikeRC
MikeRC e2 Member 93501 forum postsMikeRC vcard United Kingdom
14 Apr 2014 - 10:49 PM

Now that I'm 74, I often think that had I been born 10 year later, I might live for ever,
...however....would I want to ?

StrayCat
StrayCat e2 Member 1014808 forum postsStrayCat vcard Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
14 Apr 2014 - 10:55 PM

Not me Mike, I'm ready whenever they are now, whoever they are.Tongue I've had a pretty good life, I'd like to be around to see the grandchildren grow up, but they can do that without me. I'm 68, and my goal was 62, my father's age when he died, so this is all bonus time. This might sound dark, I have no fear of death, and I don't dwell on it either, I'm a bit of a fatalist, I think. I'd just like to be healthy till it happens.Grin

Last Modified By StrayCat at 14 Apr 2014 - 10:57 PM
Graysta
Graysta  91135 forum posts England
15 Apr 2014 - 6:47 AM

I would also like to live longer than my Dads age he is currently 92 and very much alive and kicking, still looks after himself and enjoys gardening and cooking.

brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110269 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
15 Apr 2014 - 7:11 AM

I am enjoying growing old disgracefully and have no worries about how long I have left, so long as I can go like my father and grandfather, in reasonable control of my mental faculties and able to look after myself.

Both managed to die in their sleep too which would be pretty ideal

Death left his calling card following a major motorcycle accident when I was about 20 (I was told after the event that people below #10 on the waiting list to visit me in hospital were told that they may not get the chance Wink ) so its all been bonus time since then Grin

My old gran's advice on food was to eat everything you like but in moderation, worked for her too, she was in her late 70's when she went. She called us down to visit her, then told us she had spent enough time on earth and planned to be on her way, dying a few week later, also in her sleep

Snappypappy
15 Apr 2014 - 8:19 AM

Only this life.......then the next.........then it's all over........

hobbo
hobbo e2 Member 3797 forum postshobbo vcard England2 Constructive Critique Points
15 Apr 2014 - 8:39 AM

Stop it you lot Wink

As a pre war kid ( Jan 1938) I speak from some experience....

I wouldn't have changed a thing, there have been parts that I didn't enjoy but proved to do me good in the long run......National Service and 1950s-1960s building trade spring to mind.
Both brought moments of deep dispair, but turned out to be character building, because I wouldn't let the bu**ers grind me down.

My strong advice for you young 'uns is to target retirement at 50-55 because I know from direct experience that the ten years between being 65 and 75 literally ZIPS by.

The other advice for what it's worth is to enjoy your hobbies and activities whatever they are, whilst caring for your immediate loved ones.........one golden bit of advice is...

THERE ARE NO POCKETS IN A SHROUD......so without being reckless SPEND IT.

I had a bit put by for my eventual funeral, thinking of my family......then after serious retinal problems in one eye, I needed a camera with a Viewfinder.......result?

Two weeks ago I splashed out for a new PANASONIC GX7 .......it's a godsend.

However old you are.......ENJOY!

Hobbo

brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110269 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
15 Apr 2014 - 9:09 AM

Nice one Hobbo - Olds Rule! Grin

Bluke
Bluke  9303 forum posts United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
15 Apr 2014 - 9:21 AM

I see its all the men who are giving their age away... Us ladies are not too honest. As a female I found out when you are over 55ish and you tell younger people your age they treat you as your age but if they don't know how old you are they treat you as a person..Men just don't care how old people think they are as men never act their age anyway. Grin and rightly so..

All I will say is that I have retired from the NHS 12 months ago.. Now was it early retirement or not, but since leaving work I seem to have lost confidence,conversation and personality, my photography has gone down hill... I haven't taken any pics since my hols at Christmas...turned down work, yes retirement is not all its cracked up to be but I could never go back to work for the NHS again... EVER...

Right stop feeling sorry for myself I am still alive as my mother died at 53.. So its time to move my backside and motivate myself.. I feel a new camera on the way.."need one to cheer myself up don't I "" yes a small lightweight on like the Fijifilm X-E2 would do, my D700 is not too heavy but the lenses I have feel like I am carrying a months shopping on my back...

Yes believe me there are no pockets in shrouds I know I have seen plenty of them..

Well sorry for putting my misery onto you all but blame StrayCat he started it... Grin

Cheers Guys... have a good day .. off for a spoonful of coconut oil... suppose to good for your mind... Tongue

Barbara #

NikonNovice
15 Apr 2014 - 9:27 AM

I already eat 4 out of 5 and at 45 have a lot more achs and pains than I had in my invincible youth so it must be the nuts that provide the most benefit. Off to Asda now to some before its too late.

MikeRC
MikeRC e2 Member 93501 forum postsMikeRC vcard United Kingdom
15 Apr 2014 - 9:58 AM

I too would wish to die in my sleep, like my granddad,
...not kicking and screaming like the passengers in his taxi.

thewilliam
15 Apr 2014 - 10:17 AM

My late father used to tell me that it's vital to retire TO something and never FROM a job.

He'd always wanted to be a writer so his retirement gift from the company was a word processor and printer - very primitive in those days. He remained physically and mentally fit until struck down by the big C.

Bluke, you women are lucky because you can simply "be" a person whereas we men are forever identified by a job title, whether we're in work, unemployed or retired.

Last Modified By thewilliam at 15 Apr 2014 - 10:18 AM
LouiseTopp
15 Apr 2014 - 10:23 AM

Hum I'm a spiritualist and I believe when we die, we don't. Loved one's come to get you and take you to somewhere that is so beautiful even I couldn't describe it. They say colours in the spirit world are more vivid then what you would ever see on the earth plain. When it's my time I am going to visit my grandparents and catch up on old times. people say about their dead relatives 'their looking down on us' more like 'at us' They just go into another dimension, like going from one room into another.

Apparently you can go travelling anywhere you like in the spirit world, you just think about it and your there in the blink of an eye. Time doesn't matter in spirit that's why people cannot understand why spirits appear at nighttime, because there is no nighttime in spirit. Many spirits can't talk because it takes a lot of energy, and anyway you don't need your voice box in heaven, you just think it.

brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110269 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
15 Apr 2014 - 10:57 AM

Barbara, stick with it - we used to run Pre-retirement course for staff approaching retirement, spread over 6 weeks it treated retirement as if it were another career change and helped people plan for it

One thing that was clearly stated was that, as you have experienced, there can be a period rather like mourning where one can feel depressed and lose confidence (just like changing jobs).

Over time you will get used to the new way of working and hopefully find that it is actually a rather good career change Smile

crookymonsta
crookymonsta e2 Member 6697 forum postscrookymonsta vcard England10 Constructive Critique Points
15 Apr 2014 - 12:15 PM

William's Dad was a wise man - all too often we see people retire, enjoy the first few months and then just don't know what to do with themselves.

I know too many people nearing retirement who have spent the last 10 years saying what they are going to do when they retire, yet often they could actually be doing it all that time, albeit perhaps only for a few hours a week. It's much easier to build from a firm base than to start from scratch.

I am working on learning skills and gaining qualifications which should enable me to start a new business when my husband and I retire and have time to travel more often. Until then, we travel as much as possible and enjoy in small doses all the things we would like to do more of on retirement.

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