Take your photography to the next level and beyond...

  • NEWS
  • REVIEWS
  • INSPIRATION
  • COMMUNITY
  • COMPETITIONS

Why not join for free today?

Join for Free

Your total photography experience starts here


PRIZES GALORE! Enter The ePHOTOzine Exclusive Christmas Prize Draw; Over £10,000 Worth of Prizes! Plus A Gift For Everybody On Christmas Day!

Kill It, Cook It, Eat It


col.campbell 11 818 4 United Kingdom
10 Jan 2009 4:05AM
Opinions, please from anyone who's watched this, or indeed if you haven't.

Personally I'd have no qualms about shooting and eating an animal. Cleaning and preparing the carcass might be a different matter; more difficult for me. Also, I think breaking the animal's neck or slitting its throat would also be difficult for me. That said, ask me again when I haven't eaten for a day or two...

I normally avoid 'reality' programmes like the plague but watching a couple of episodes of this series, I'm quite glad to see a genuine dose of reality - if you eat meat, this is where your food comes from. So having said that, and knowing that I could shoot an animal fairly easily, I feel a bit hypocritical.

Then again, I feel that some of the veggies and vegans who turned up and then started bawling, shouldn't have been allowed in in the first place. Alternatively, in the name of entertainment (and honesty) perhaps they should have been forced to go hungry for a day or two to see if their attitudes changed. For all my squeamish hypocrisy, I'm pretty confident I'd be killing any animal I could in whatever way it took in order to eat, once hungry.

As I said, opinions (and reasons) please...

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

StrayCat e2
10 15.5k 2 Canada
10 Jan 2009 5:31AM
Coincidentally, I just finished watching an episode of Survivorman. In my childhood days, and in my teens and early twenties, I was exposed to the realities of where my food came from, and the worst memory is the smell in the kitchen when my mother was skinning and cleaning wild rabbits that my father had snared. If you haven't smelled it, you're fortunate. By the same token, we enjoyed it immensely, even the brains. My father also shot a moose, caribou, and bear most autumns; this was hung in his sawmill behind our home. There were also sea birds, and lots of fresh fish, and it was common to see these being prepared in our home. But I can see it being a novelty for most people today. Some traditional dishes that would not be popular with today's folk that we ate are; Stewed Cod's heads, cod tongues and cheeks, moose and caribou liver and heart, calf's brains (from a can, no less). Blood Pudding was popular, but I never saw it made. The last time I had blood pudding was the dining room of the Metropole Hotel in Brighton, for breakfast...delicious.

One thing I have never seen or done myself, is the slaughtering of domestic animals for food.

All those things are in the past for me, and I feel no regrets. We still have meat and fish, but we buy it already prepared. As Strawman said yesterday; you civilised us.Wink
stevie e2
10 1.2k 2 United Kingdom
10 Jan 2009 6:28AM
My Italian grandmother often killed and prepared chickens on the family farm where we stayed. First time I saw this, as a kid, was a bit of a shock (surely meat came from shops?) but you soon learn the way things are is the way things are.
accystan 10 132 6 Canada
10 Jan 2009 8:18AM
As David Suziki once (aproximately) said, "We all end up on something's (or somebody's) menu". I guess if you're cremated that might not apply but I think it's largely correct. I personally have never had to slaughter the food I've eaten but I've ultimately come to believe that the true crime of our society is not the eating of meat but the cruel conditions in which we keep animals in order to satisfy our needs. In truth, our perceived needs.

One of the best books I've ever read on the subject of our (Western) food supply is "In Defense of Food". In a nutshell it examines the "efforts" Western society has put into food production, regulation, science, control, supply, marketing etc, etc, etc. only to end up with a civilisation that is over-fed, under-nourished and riddled with unique and uneccessary diseases.

Just my opinion....

Cheers,

Dave D
conrad 10 10.9k 116
10 Jan 2009 11:46AM

Quote:perhaps they should have been forced to go hungry for a day or two to see if their attitudes changed. For all my squeamish hypocrisy, I'm pretty confident I'd be killing any animal I could in whatever way it took in order to eat, once hungry.


Haven't seen the programme, but I feel the same way. I eat meat. I would have no problems shooting an animal for meat, if I felt it was necessary. Other methods, more er... "up close and personal", might be difficult for me under normal circumstances, but if I'd gone hungry for a few days, that would probably change, I imagine.

Question is indeed if vegetarians/vegans would rather starve, or kill and eat. Can't judge that one myself, but it's an interesting question.
mark_delta 7 1.3k
10 Jan 2009 11:53AM

Quote:Question is indeed if vegetarians/vegans would rather starve, or kill and eat

Now that would be good TV !!!
joolsb 10 27.1k 38 Switzerland
10 Jan 2009 11:54AM
There is an unhealthy obsession with meat in the West. I'm not a vegetarian but I am consciously trying to eat less meat - simply because a little goes a long way, nutritionally speaking.
ade_mcfade e2
10 15.1k 216 England
10 Jan 2009 12:03PM
I like meat
lobsterboy e2
11 14.2k 13 United Kingdom
10 Jan 2009 12:07PM

Quote:Question is indeed if vegetarians/vegans would rather starve, or kill and eat

I think I would rather starve than eat vegetables.
col.campbell 11 818 4 United Kingdom
10 Jan 2009 12:08PM
Yes Ade but the point is, where do you think you'd fare it came to hunting/ butchering your own food?
col.campbell 11 818 4 United Kingdom
10 Jan 2009 12:10PM

Quote:I think I would rather starve than eat vegetables.

lol a friend of mine was once asked if he would like salad on his burger. Horrified and outraged, he replied, 'that's not food, that's the stuff that food eats!'
Rende e2
7 37 4 Netherlands
10 Jan 2009 12:16PM
The question whether vegetarians/vegans would rather starve than kill and eat meat is totally beside the point as long as there is more food to be had on a diet with no meat, than on a meat diet. The way meat is produced these days wastes at least 75% of available food and water.
Living in the wilderness and hunting your own food is a different matter, but who does that these days Wink
Rende
SuziBlue 12 16.2k 10 Scotland
10 Jan 2009 12:21PM

Quote:I would rather starve than eat vegetables.


That's sorted then - I'll eat them Smile Ta very much. Grin

I honestly don't know what I'd do if I was literally starving to death and had nothing else. It's like the question "would you be capable of killing another human being" - I've never been in the military and I honestly don't know until I'm in the position of having to fight for my life if I'd be able to take someone else's life.

[edit] rende - exactly. In the wild it's perfectly possible to survive without killing animals - depending on where the wild is of course.In the UK it's perfectly possible. In Iceland - nope - as far as I know, anyway.
lobsterboy e2
11 14.2k 13 United Kingdom
10 Jan 2009 12:25PM

Quote:"would you be capable of killing another human being"


Depends if it is Noel Edmonds or not.
Carabosse e2
11 39.7k 269 England
10 Jan 2009 12:31PM
There are cultures where killing and eating cats and dogs is unremarkable, but I suspect British and other Western sensibilities might be offended at the thought of chopping up Rover and Tiddles for Sunday lunch! Wink

We are a bit selective about the animals we are prepared to eat.

Sign In

You must be a member to leave a comment.

ePHOTOzine, the web's friendliest photography community.

Join For Free

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more.