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lens swap?

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iannidan
iannidan  565 forum posts United Kingdom
24 Jun 2011 - 12:10 PM

i currently use a 300f4l for my wildlife shots. but i keep loosing the subject when i put my eye to the viewfinder, ( no the lens cap isn`t on) so was thinking of changing to a 100-400. any thoughts.

thanks
ian

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24 Jun 2011 - 12:10 PM

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ARI
ARI  11500 forum posts United Kingdom
24 Jun 2011 - 12:23 PM

Ian, its practice, practice, practice. There is a narrow field of view and have to develop finding the target. Advantage of the 100-400 is that u can aquire the target at 100mm and then zoom out. This make the aquisition of the target slower. However the 300 4 is a sharp lens, do you really want to swap? I use the 100-400 and generally do not have problems with the focusing but is not as sharp as the 300 4L. However I do have a problem in aquireing the subject with a 600 as I do not practice often enough.

BillyGoatGruff
BillyGoatGruff e2 Member 7191 forum postsBillyGoatGruff vcard England199 Constructive Critique Points
24 Jun 2011 - 12:27 PM

Have you tried practise?! Wink

Another trick is to look along the lens with your eye close to the eyepiece but not looking through it - essentially sighting along the lens barrel, then moving your eye to the view finder. Takes some practise, but is achievable.
I used to do this when using an unmounted spotting telescope many years ago.

What you seem to be experiencing is poor technique. Buying a new lens to use a lower magnification and then zooming in seems to be a rather expensive way around your problem.

Practise is the key. Smile

MikeRC
MikeRC e2 Member 93485 forum postsMikeRC vcard United Kingdom
24 Jun 2011 - 12:34 PM


Quote: Practise is the key.

.....another vote for practice....I shoot with a 28-300 lens wide open and choose how the bird tries, it rarely gets away.
....still don't get the shots I want but that's another story Smile

....Mike

iannidan
iannidan  565 forum posts United Kingdom
24 Jun 2011 - 12:39 PM

i thought that might be the answer, but sometimes i think it would be nice to have a zoom.
i`ll keep trying, and trying and lol

RoyBoy
RoyBoy  9162 forum posts United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
24 Jun 2011 - 1:00 PM

I am not into wildlife photography but a very good, highly experienced and well known friend of mine who is (Roger Hance) told me once that the problem with the 100-400 zoom lens in a hide is the movement can be detected by the wildlife and put them off.

Something else you might like to consider?

Roy

strawman
strawman  1021997 forum posts United Kingdom16 Constructive Critique Points
24 Jun 2011 - 1:06 PM

I find the 100-400 handy for this as you can zoom out to get the wider view for framing and because it is a slide zoom you can rapidly zoom in once you have your subject in sight. It would be harder to do with a twist type zoom. No expert though.

justin c
justin c  104510 forum posts England36 Constructive Critique Points
24 Jun 2011 - 1:28 PM

There could be several reasons why the 100-400mm may be preferable to your 300mm, such as versatility, but certainly not for the reason you mention. For wildlife photography you'll probably be at the 400mm end most of the time, which would make it even harder finding your subject than what your experiencing now. Whilst in theory, you certainly could find your subject with the lens at 100mm and then zoom out, in most cases that won't really be practical. By the time you've found your subject, zoomed out, composed and focused, you're subject will probably be well gone.
Finding your subject with a 300mm lens really shouldn't be difficult once you've got used to it. You should try it with a 500mm, 600mm or an 800mm with extenders and on a cropped sensor body, it'll make your 300mm lens seem almost like a wide-angle lens TongueWink

Last Modified By justin c at 24 Jun 2011 - 1:29 PM
thewilliam
24 Jun 2011 - 2:04 PM

Many years ago, I used a 1000mm that had a rifle-style sight mounted on it, just as astronomical telescopes generally have a small spotter 'scope attached. Could you rig something up?

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1314811 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
24 Jun 2011 - 2:42 PM


Quote: i currently use a 300f4l for my wildlife shots. but i keep loosing the subject when i put my eye to the viewfinder

Binoculars ?

iannidan
iannidan  565 forum posts United Kingdom
24 Jun 2011 - 2:46 PM


Quote: i currently use a 300f4l for my wildlife shots. but i keep loosing the subject when i put my eye to the viewfinder

Binoculars ?

????????

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1314811 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
24 Jun 2011 - 3:03 PM


Quote: Quote:i currently use a 300f4l for my wildlife shots. but i keep loosing the subject when i put my eye to the viewfinder

Binoculars ?

????????

Yep

p6240121.jpg

Come in handy when using fast long primes on tripods.

Rev2
Rev2  4211 forum posts United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
24 Jun 2011 - 6:41 PM

The 300 is a very good lens as I'm sure you're aware. The 100-400 is up there too and what it lacks in speed it certainly makes up for in versatility. I've got some shots I wouldn't have managed with a fixed prime including one of a Grey Heron in flight which gained me first place in a local competition. It took off as I was taking photos of it perched and I quickly zoomed out to get the shot.

I had considered getting the 300 & 1.4x convertor as it's lighter to carry around but I've just spent nearly 350 on replacement AF & IS units for it so it looks like I'll be keeping it for a while. Never satisfied with our equipment are we? Wink

iannidan
iannidan  565 forum posts United Kingdom
25 Jun 2011 - 11:34 AM

Never satisfied with our equipment are we? Wink
[/quote]

never, we always want something else.
i can follow the subject then loose it when i put the camera up to my eye. the lens is great, as peolpe have said find time to PRACTICE!

John_Wannop
John_Wannop e2 Member 952 forum postsJohn_Wannop vcard Wales
25 Jun 2011 - 4:10 PM

Have you tried keeping your left eye open to track the target, takes a while to get used to but worth the effort.

John

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