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Light Meter

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    minniema
    minniema  548 forum posts United Kingdom
    27 May 2011 - 10:05 PM

    Am needing some recommendations for light meters to use with some old film camera's I've been given. Have heard that Weston Master V are good ones, anyone got one or used one what are they like? Also what are Leningrad meters like? Or any others i should be looking at?
    Cheers

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    27 May 2011 - 10:05 PM

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    elowes
    elowes  102832 forum posts United Kingdom
    27 May 2011 - 10:14 PM

    Used both many years ago. Weston better quality with good results, Leningrad were very much cheaper but gave reasonable results. There are many modern types on the market which may be more accurate.

    User_Removed
    27 May 2011 - 10:19 PM

    The old, good ones used Selenium as their 'core' measuring 'device' (note the quotes please Smile) and they fade with age and therefore their accuracy is questionable now i.e. 20/30years on.

    The metering of a modern digital camera will be a better 'bet' to give you the Exposure Values sought to expose the film in your film camera (based on a film speed of 100 ISO). That said, there is still a lot to said for using the old baseline - 'Bright Sunlight = 1/125th @ f11' - and alter the EV dependent on the lighting conditions (again - based on 100 ISO [or ASA as was Wink])

    Last Modified By User_Removed at 27 May 2011 - 10:20 PM
    JJGEE
    JJGEE  96291 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
    27 May 2011 - 10:39 PM


    Quote: The metering of a modern digital camera will be a better 'bet' to give you the Exposure Values sought to expose the film

    Are you suggesting using a digital camera purely as, the light meter ? Wink

    Last Modified By JJGEE at 27 May 2011 - 10:40 PM
    franken
    franken e2 Member 113108 forum postsfranken vcard Wales4 Constructive Critique Points
    28 May 2011 - 8:03 AM

    Why not get one of these and try it out?

    http://photography.shop.ebay.co.uk/i.html?_from=R40&_npmv=3&_trksid=p391...


    Ken

    thewilliam
    28 May 2011 - 11:12 AM

    At one stage Annie Liebowitz used a 35mm Nikon as a light meter and a medium format camera for taking the pix. Very sensible: because the meter systems in Nikon cameras are very good indeed and these days you could buy a good Nikon film body a lot cheaper than a top-end light-meter.

    Hand meters are a mixed blessing. An unskilled user can be led to an exposure setting that's very wrong!

    User_Removed
    28 May 2011 - 1:24 PM

    You'll get a Leningrad-4 on eBay for 1 or 2.

    Before I invested in a CdS Prism finder for my RB67, I used one.

    Compared to the meter in my Nikon dSLRs it reads about half a stop slow, but that is consistent throughout the range and, in any case is well within the exposure latitude of film.

    Sooty_1
    Sooty_1 Critique Team 41202 forum posts United Kingdom198 Constructive Critique Points
    29 May 2011 - 1:44 AM

    Sunny 16 rule:

    Shutter speed = 1/ISO at f/16 in bright sunlight.

    Sunny but hazy, f/11
    Bright shade, f/8
    Shadows on a sunny day, f/8
    flat grey day, f/5.6
    'orrible weather, rain, dull grey, f/2.8-f/4

    Of course you can change the shutter speed to keep the exposure value constant.

    If you have a meter in another camera, guess before you meter and compare it...within a couple of days you will only need to check your thoughts or if the light changes dramatically. You will be amazed at how consistent light levels are in this country.

    Nick

    Just Jas
    Just Jas  1225751 forum posts England1 Constructive Critique Points
    29 May 2011 - 3:58 PM


    Quote: Why not get one of these and try it out

    I have a Weston EuroMaster which gives me good results.

    Using colour transparency with Yashica TLR.

    Using the Invercone.

    Paul Morgan
    Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315238 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
    29 May 2011 - 8:12 PM

    I`d just get a modern light meter, there fairly cheap, light weight and reliable.

    http://www.warehouseexpress.com/buy-sekonic-l-308s-flashmate-light-meter/p100684...
    http://www.warehouseexpress.com/buy-polaris-digital-meter/p1007261

    filmforever
    29 May 2011 - 10:03 PM

    A Sekonic with invercone facility and a flash metering mode is a good buy. the Weston meters are superb, but get one with an invercone attachment with it. This measures the light falling on the subject rather then reflected from it, far more accurate in some circumstances.

    Just Jas
    Just Jas  1225751 forum posts England1 Constructive Critique Points
    30 May 2011 - 12:33 PM


    Quote: I have a Weston EuroMaster which gives me good results...... Using the Invercone.

    Great minds think alike? Grin

    Last Modified By Just Jas at 30 May 2011 - 12:35 PM
    minniema
    minniema  548 forum posts United Kingdom
    31 May 2011 - 10:38 PM

    Thanks everyone for the advice/recommendations. Am gonna give the sunny 16 rule a go whilst i save up for a light meter! Am off to Manchester friday so gonna take the camera and see what results i get

    HJKeithW
    HJKeithW  659 forum posts New Zealand
    8 Jun 2011 - 5:53 AM

    See this URL for the Sunny f16 Rule taken to its conclusion
    http://www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm#Light%20Intensity%20Chart

    I have a Weston MAsterV which is excellent also a Sekonic L398 which I see is advertised in the UK magazine 'Practical Photography' for 135 GB pounds

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