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Lightroom - v - Photoshop

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mikehit
mikehit  56428 forum posts United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
17 Jan 2013 - 2:47 PM

Maximum sharpening in LR is not as powerful as in PS but it can still do a fair bit. So I would sharpen in LR and use PS if a bit more is needed. Noise reduction I would do in LR - it is reckoned to be a market leader for that.
Interestingly, for PS they used to recommend basic sharpening in Camera RAW, then full shaprening should be done only after all other editing has been done. In LR I have not seen any difference between doing sharpening first or last. having said that, fritzing with the contrast and clarity first canhave a sharpening effect itself so you don;t need to be as aggressive later on and help avoid the artefacts you sometimes get.

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17 Jan 2013 - 2:47 PM

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canonfan46
17 Jan 2013 - 2:52 PM

Thanks mikehit

User_Removed
17 Jan 2013 - 4:09 PM


Quote:
In LR I have not seen any difference between doing sharpening first or last..

You may not see it in many cases (and never at less than 100% on an HD monitor) but the conventional wisdom is that, in LR, sharpening should always be done last as it reduces the amount of data available for other processes. There is, actually, quite a lot of merit in doing LR processing in the order the functions appear in the RH panel in the Develop module. The one exception I sometimes make is to do any lens profile corrections first, just so that I can better see what I am working with.

Another tip when working with Lightroom - if you are using plug-ins such as Nik SilverEfexPro, HDREfexPro, ColorEfexPro, etc., from within Lightroom, kill any sharpening that your LR import defaults has applied before taking the image across to the Nik Plug-in. You can always re-apply later.

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mikehit
mikehit  56428 forum posts United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
17 Jan 2013 - 4:23 PM


Quote: There is, actually, quite a lot of merit in doing LR processing in the order the functions appear in the RH panel in the Develop module. The one exception I sometimes make is to do any lens profile corrections first, just so that I can better see what I am working with.

That's the process I follow, LF and in that workflow the sharpening is before the noise reduction. But in PS/PSE if you sharpen early you risk halos around the noise artefacts so they recommend noise reduction before sharpening. I guess that is because LR is non-destructive so the effects are 'in parallel', whereas in PS they are destructive and so they are sequential. It does mean though that in LR you can play around with different settings with less worry about interference between functions.

Jestertheclown
17 Jan 2013 - 4:47 PM

The conventional wisdom, as promoted every time in the critique gallery, is that you should do everything that you're going to do to your image, in whatever order and using whichever software, then save it, perhaps (although not necessarily) close it, re-open it and then and only then, sharpen it.

GlennH
GlennH  91918 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
17 Jan 2013 - 5:02 PM

Possibly the most widely respected sharpening regime is multi-pass sharpening, as recommended by the late Bruce Fraser after extensive research by him. That consists of capture sharpening, creative sharpening (where required), and output sharpening. Lightroom was very much engineered with those ideas in mind—so the initial sharpening you apply in Lightroom's workflow is effectively capture sharpening.

pmorgan
pmorgan  7217 forum posts England13 Constructive Critique Points
17 Jan 2013 - 5:20 PM

Just read through this thread with interest. I think it all boils down to personal preference, as these type of things always seem to. Over the years I have used most of the main editing programs both professionally as a graphic designer, and more recently for my photography. I currently use a combination of Bridge and Photoshop. The ACR engine within CS6 seems extremely similar to Lightroom as I remember it, and Bridge handles all of my photo “admin”.

From start to finish my workflow is now down to around 15mins using actions that I have written to help with resizing and watermarking for web etc. But then, I focus mainly on Landscape photography and have never been one for taking record shots and being 100% true to the scene at the time. I let my artistic side take over to produce images with hopefully a tad more mood and atmosphere which I find Photoshop works best for.

I wonder if I was say a wedding photographer whether I would lean more towards Lightroom, as the amount of files that would need to be processed, and processed quickly would probably benefit from the strong batch editing and presets that Lightroom has to offer.

To surmise, I think go with what you feel comfortable with and that gets you to the end result. There’s no right or wrong way, just your way, and what works for you.

canonfan46
17 Jan 2013 - 6:34 PM

Thanks all, I now feel reassured that I am working along the correct lines.
I think I have got a good understanding of LR now and feel quite confident with all aspects of it.
PS is a different matter, so I think I will continue to rely on LR for most of my processing but put a lot more of my learning time into PS.
Once again, thank you all for your help.

John

Last Modified By canonfan46 at 17 Jan 2013 - 6:36 PM
User_Removed
17 Jan 2013 - 10:52 PM


Quote:
I think I have got a good understanding of LR now and feel quite confident with all aspects of it.
PS is a different matter.......

You are not alone there, John. To me, as a long-time photographer, LR all seems very intuitive while PS talks a whole new language and, I must confess, I tend only to learn bits of that language as I need them, rather than trying to become fluent in the whole shebang. I guess (and I can only guess) that at present I speak about 5% of a rather strong dialect!!

Smile

ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade e2 Member 1014805 forum postsade_mcfade vcard England216 Constructive Critique Points
17 Jan 2013 - 11:07 PM

"Synch" - that's why I use Lightroom Wink

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315324 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
18 Jan 2013 - 1:26 AM

Lightroom, its so much cheaper to buy and generally cheaper to upgrade, though I`m stuck with 3.6 until I can upgrade the PC, the latest version of LR does not support Windows XP, in my case its not a cheap upgrade Sad

Photoshop`s great if you have a bottomless pocket or if only want to work in Tiffs or Jpegs, your creative and like playing around with home made actions.

SueEley
SueEley e2 Member 8271 forum postsSueEley vcard Wales96 Constructive Critique Points
18 Jan 2013 - 6:57 PM

Always sharpen only when you have final output size - saves sharpening twice after resizing and also allows you to take final product into account - some papers need more sharpening to the image than others, for example.

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GlennH
GlennH  91918 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
18 Jan 2013 - 7:42 PM

Lightroom sharpening is derived from these ideas from ten years or more ago, and is based on widely accepted logic (it's described here amongst the UPDIG processing guidelines, for instance). Once-only sharpening is still adhered to by many, but it's very far from being the unchallenged idea that it was a decade ago—hence there are multiple opportunities to sharpen through the LR workflow.

Last Modified By GlennH at 18 Jan 2013 - 7:45 PM

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