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Gundog
Gundog  1624 forum posts Scotland
29 Jul 2013 - 11:52 AM


Quote: Why would anyone bother with all that?

As i said earlier, just export them, finished, at their full size and re-size them in CS6.

That wouldn't work Jester.

You would have to export them full size from Lightroom without any sharpening and then do the sharpening and resizing in CS6 I think.

The whole point about Lightroom sharpening is that it is applied on export to suit the size being exported - but the bug prevents it being applied to sizes of one-third or less. If you exported at full size, for subsequent resizing in CS6, it would have the incorrect sharpening for the final size.

It really is a pity that we don't have a real Lightroom expert, like Jeff Schewe, on this chatroom as he could explain these things far more clearly and authoritatively than I can. Lula is a good place to go for such advice (if I am allowed to "advertise" a different chatroom here).

Last Modified By Gundog at 29 Jul 2013 - 11:54 AM
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29 Jul 2013 - 11:52 AM

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lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1014027 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 12:02 PM


Quote: That wouldn't work Jester.

You would have to export them full size from Lightroom without any sharpening and then do the sharpening and resizing in CS6 I think.

I'm pretty sure that is what Jester is saying: Export at full size (or just select edit in PS) then do the resize & sharpening in CS6.

Works well and has the advantage of allowing you to tweak the amount of sharpening for each shot.

Last Modified By lobsterboy at 29 Jul 2013 - 12:04 PM
GlennH
GlennH  91894 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 12:11 PM


Quote: It really is a pity that we don't have a real Lightroom expert, like Jeff Schewe, on this chatroom as he could explain these things far more clearly and authoritatively than I can.

He would certainly be able to answer because he, with Bruce Fraser, was behind LR sharpening - the algorithms were lifted from Photokit Sharpener. What you're saying is true, though - export sharpening automatically legislates for output medium and size, so without that you're on your own. A plug-in called 'Focal Blade' does a similar job in Photoshop, though it costs a modest sum.

lobsterboy
lobsterboy Site Moderator 1014027 forum postslobsterboy vcard United Kingdom13 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 12:21 PM

or you can use these scripts - but if you are sharpening for screen a pair of eyes & smart sharpen will work well. Plus you can use layers to selectively sharpen areas of the pic.

JJGEE
JJGEE  96223 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 12:23 PM


Quote: It really is a pity that we don't have a real Lightroom expert, like Jeff Schewe

Well, it could keep the epz moderators busy as he tends to speak is mind and is sometimes bordering on the " acceptable " / " unacceptable " dividing line !

His book -- The Digital Negative is worth getting though Wink

Last Modified By JJGEE at 29 Jul 2013 - 12:24 PM
Gundog
Gundog  1624 forum posts Scotland
29 Jul 2013 - 3:55 PM


Quote:
Well, it could keep the epz moderators busy as he tends to speak is mind and is sometimes bordering on the " acceptable " / " unacceptable " dividing line !

His book -- The Digital Negative is worth getting though Wink

I've never found him to be rude or over-direct unless he is attacked in a belligerent tone. Then, I admit, he can sometimes "respond in kind". Smile

Jestertheclown
29 Jul 2013 - 4:20 PM


Quote: I'm pretty sure that is what Jester is saying: Export at full size (or just select edit in PS) then do the resize & sharpening in CS6.

Works well and has the advantage of allowing you to tweak the amount of sharpening for each shot.


Yes, that was what I meant Chris.

The sharpening tools in CS6 are more than capable of producing the desired results. If anything, accurate sharpening, maybe using layers, is one of the things that Photoshop is decidedly better at than Lightroom.

JJGEE
JJGEE  96223 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 7:28 PM


Quote: The sharpening tools in CS6 are more than capable of producing the desired results

The trouble is knowing what the desired results should be...

well it is for me Sad

Jestertheclown
29 Jul 2013 - 8:20 PM


Quote: The trouble is knowing what the desired results should be...

I know that feeling!
I used to have real problems getting the sharpness of my images right.
In the end, Willie, from the CG came to my rescue with some really good advice and some examples.
Nowadays, I can tell fairly easily which bits are OK and which bits need more attention, which is where CS scores over Lightroom insomuch as it allows the use of layers.

JJGEE
JJGEE  96223 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 8:32 PM


Quote: which is where CS scores over Lightroom insomuch as it allows the use of layers.

How does using layers help with the sharpening ?

Jestertheclown
29 Jul 2013 - 8:56 PM

I seldom make adjustments of any kind to the original image, everything's done using a layer, that way it's a simple matter to undo it!
With regard to sharpening, I might want to selectively sharpen different parts of the shot using a separate layer for each adjustment.
I don't go to those lengths all the time; for a simple snapshot, for example, I'd probably just make a global adjustment using smart sharpening or USM but even that would probably be done using a separate layer to the one I'd use to adjust curves, or something else.

brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110181 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 9:01 PM

I like the fact that with LR5 I can "paint" sharpness and softness into specific areas of an image, so maybe with a portrait I will reduce the sharpness of the skin whilst boosting the sharpness of the eyes, hair and teeth

I have CS6, (got it through a legal but low cost route in one of the early versions then upgraded ) but find I rarely use it these days

Jestertheclown
29 Jul 2013 - 9:20 PM

I think it's largely down to what you're used to Brian.
Your 'painting' equates (sort of) to my layers.
In the old days of LR2, I really couldn't get on with it. There were lots of things about it that I couldn't make work the way I wanted it to and I wasn't a fan of LR3 either.
I was however, pretty well versed in how to use Photoshop, CS2 back then, so Lightroom got used for converting raws and not much else.
I finally moved away from LR3 because it stopped working, just as LR5 was being released, so I tried the beta, then the trial and finally I decided that it might be worth persevering with, so I bought it.
Since then, I've come to appreciate what it can do but I still return to CS6 to finish off, probably because I know that I can do a better job there.

brian1208
brian1208 e2 Member 1110181 forum postsbrian1208 vcard United Kingdom12 Constructive Critique Points
29 Jul 2013 - 10:56 PM


Quote: I think it's largely down to what you're used to Brian

absolutely, I was in at the beginning with LR having been one of many involved in the initial development programme for its predecessor Raw Shooter Premium, that Adobe took over and developed into LR (getting freebie copies of both programmes when they were released to the public as a consequence Grin ) so I guess its more or less instinctive (whereas I have always found CS to be difficult to get the best from, annoying at one level because I see so much wonderful work produced using it)

As always, no "Right" answer, its what ever suits the individuals best at the time

JJGEE
JJGEE  96223 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
30 Jul 2013 - 7:35 AM


Quote: the initial development programme for its predecessor Raw Shooter Premium, that Adobe took over and developed into LR

Brian, that is not quite correct, Lightroom started out as Shadowland around 2002

Adobe did indeed buy RSP in June 2006 after which one new feature was the Vibrancy slider ( it apparently was pretty good in RSP ).

This was still before LR 1 though.

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