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looking for a macro lens

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robthecamman
5 Sep 2013 - 4:31 PM

read the reviews they tell you go non is spend the extra on other camera gear Smile

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lemmy
lemmy  61672 forum posts United Kingdom
5 Sep 2013 - 4:35 PM


Quote: read the reviews they tell you go non is spend the extra on other camera gear

What does that mean?

mikehit
mikehit e2 Member 45761 forum postsmikehit vcard United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
5 Sep 2013 - 4:56 PM

Can you tell me which reviews give that advice?

Ade_Osman
Ade_Osman e2 Member 114435 forum postsAde_Osman vcard England36 Constructive Critique Points
5 Sep 2013 - 8:22 PM


Quote: read the reviews they tell you go non is spend the extra on other camera gear

All depends on how you use it IMHO, if your a butterfly tog who uses the lens mostly handheld then IS is invaluable, if on the other hand you're like me and most of your work is done using a tripod using manual focus then IS isn't so important.

Glostopcat
Glostopcat e2 Member 8226 forum postsGlostopcat vcard England2 Constructive Critique Points
5 Sep 2013 - 9:06 PM

I have a second hand Canon 100mm macro lens without image stabilisation which I bought off fellow epzer gary_d and regularly use it for photographing butterflies and dragonflies and rarely have problems when using it handheld. I seldom use a tripod apart from when doing landsape photography or very occasionally when I'm in the hides at Slimbridge or the RSPB reserves in the Forest of Dean.

robthecamman
5 Sep 2013 - 10:59 PM

the review phoblographer review Smile

Last Modified By robthecamman at 5 Sep 2013 - 11:02 PM
mikehit
mikehit e2 Member 45761 forum postsmikehit vcard United Kingdom9 Constructive Critique Points
6 Sep 2013 - 10:34 AM


Quote: The review phoblographer review Smile

I suggest you re-read it because he never said what you claim. He gave reasons as to why the non-IS was the more logical choice for him. And he gave very good reasons to buy the L version - in fact that was one review that I used to make my decision to buy the L version.

Last Modified By mikehit at 6 Sep 2013 - 10:35 AM
GlennH
GlennH e2 Member 81822 forum postsGlennH vcard France1 Constructive Critique Points
6 Sep 2013 - 10:43 AM


Quote: I suggest you re-read it because he never said what you claim. He gave reasons as to why the non-IS was the more logical choice for him. And he gave very good reasons to buy the L version - in fact that was one review that I used to make my decision to buy the L version.

I looked at that review, Mike - doesn't he mention at one point that forward/backward image stabilisation is ineffective, or less effective? My knowledge of IS is poor, but that's what I read into one part of the text.

ARI
ARI  11500 forum posts United Kingdom
6 Sep 2013 - 12:05 PM

Another vote fr the 100 IS. Not tied to tripod, great with a monopod too

annettep38
annettep38 e2 Member 2186 forum postsannettep38 vcard France30 Constructive Critique Points
17 Sep 2013 - 10:38 PM


Quote: I have a second hand Canon 100mm macro lens without image stabilisation which I bought off fellow epzer gary_d and regularly use it for photographing butterflies and dragonflies and rarely have problems when using it handheld. I seldom use a tripod apart from when doing landsape photography or very occasionally when I'm in the hides at Slimbridge or the RSPB reserves in the Forest of Dean.

couldn't agree more
Can't say anything about Canon but IS or VR is really not needed for macro. I have been taking 1000s of macros without and I dare say my critters are sharp.
I'd also consider a longer macro, i.e. 150mm sigma, 180 tamron or a 200mm ( dunno if Canion does the same as the 200 f/4 nikkor) if you are going for insects.

markahoy
markahoy  1 United Kingdom
18 Sep 2013 - 12:42 PM

I'd back up the earlier comment about the Sigma 105mm f2.8 - I've had that for a few years now (on a Nikon) and have found it excellent.

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