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Low Light/High ISO


bppowell e2
13 2.1k 2 England
3 Aug 2012 8:21PM
I have the Olympus E30 and I am 95% happy with it.

Where it lets me down a bit is in low light conditions, when the ISO gets above 200 the noise is noticeable.

Can anyone recommend a DSLR around 1000 that is better then the E30 in these conditions.

Barry

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Graysta e2
9 1.1k England
3 Aug 2012 9:35PM
Possibly the Nikon D7000.

The Nikons seem to be the low light winners at the moment,I have D3 - D3s -and D800 and they
are special in low light.
The D3s being the best.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
3 Aug 2012 9:47PM
The new Olympus OM-D
Pentax k5 same sensor as nikon d7000 very cheap at moment and magnesium shell . weather sealing if i remember rightly better low light peformance than d7000. But nikon have much more lenses
justin c e2
11 4.6k 36 England
3 Aug 2012 10:00PM
A lot will depend on how low the light is and how high an ISO setting you're prepared to go. Noise is very subjective and what may be acceptable to one person, may not be to someone else.
It's worth remembering that there are those that assess noise levels of the unedited Raw file, at silly magnifications, with their nose on the monitor screen Tongue and there is the far more valuable method, IMHO, of viewing the actual finished product, i.e. a well processed, noise reduced image, viewed in your preferred manner, i.e. a print, a projected image, displayed on the web, viewed on a television, etc, etc.

But on to the actual matter of which camera body for under 1000. Two that come to mind and the only ones I've experience with, are:

1) Canon 5D (plenty on the secondhand market at approximately half of your budget), no problem with ISO 1600.

2) Canon 5D Mk II, an even better option, but I've no idea of what price they go for secondhand. I've had some very usable results at ISO 6400.
StrayCat e2
10 15.5k 2 Canada
3 Aug 2012 10:11PM
The OM-D, definitely, and your 4/3 lenses will work with most features using the Olympus 4/3 to micro 4/3 adapter. One thing we have to remember when setting higher ISOs is to check the histogram and make sure we're getting enough detail to the right. Just crank in a bit of +EV compensation.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
4 Aug 2012 12:22AM

Quote:Noise is very subjective and what may be acceptable to one person, may not be to someone else


I always found the noise ok up to around 1600 ISO with these camera`s.


Quote:Can anyone recommend a DSLR around 1000 that is better then the E30 in these conditions


All, including a fair few compacts Smile
ianrobinson e2
5 1.2k 8 United Kingdom
4 Aug 2012 7:45AM
I hate noise in my Images personally and If I can although it cannot be helped getting noise i will denoise with a software.
The highest i have shot with noise is ISO 3200 with wildlife, some may say that is way too much, but with a good lens and software for denoising colour noise is now history for me.
Saying that when i shoot weddings i would rather not have any noise to start with so i use flash guns with defusers and get creative or use a wide aperture lens say f1.4 or 1.8 for example.

some cameras can cope with noise and some can't.

I find my 5d mark ii full frame handles low light very well and you can pick them up now for around 1200.00.
4 Aug 2012 8:30AM
Any recent DSLR will improve on the E30 for noise. A larger sensor will also help of course - your budget won't run to an FF camera but any APS-C will offer about 60% more light collection capacity than the 4/3 E30. At the moment the best APS-C sensor for high ISO (and virtually everything else) is the Sony 16Mp sensor. This is used in the Nikon D7000, Pentax K5 and Sony A57, Nex 5n. The Sony A57 loses 30% of the light because of the translucent mirror so, if low light capability is your priority, I'd go for the Nikon D7000. The Olympus OMD-EM5 also has a good reputation for high ISO - it's got a 4/3 size 16Mp, apparently also made by Sony.
bppowell e2
13 2.1k 2 England
4 Aug 2012 4:26PM
Thanks for all the comments, I will have a look at the suggestions.

I was looking at the Nikon D3 and the Canon 5D Mk II yesterday but both of them were well over the 2000 mark body only, so I ruled them out.

My best option might be the OMD-EM5 + adapter it may save me having to get a lens as well.

Barry
Coleslaw e2
9 13.4k 28 Wales
4 Aug 2012 4:39PM
As you do wildlife mostly, I am not sure if you do a lot of focus tracking, and how EM5 fairs on that department. AF is probably quick on EM5 but focus tracking is different.
bppowell e2
13 2.1k 2 England
4 Aug 2012 4:55PM
The camera would be mostly used in a church or registry office where flash is not allowed.

At the moment I use the E30 and software but think there must be a simpler way, hence looking into a new camera.

Barry
4 Aug 2012 4:55PM

Quote:As you do wildlife mostly, I am not sure if you do a lot of focus tracking, and how EM5 fairs on that department. AF is probably quick on EM5 but focus tracking is different.


Yes. I don't think an EM5 would be a good idea for wildlife. Wait for the next generation with phase detection AF which can't be far off. Otherwise go for a DSLR or an SLT which have it now.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
4 Aug 2012 5:06PM

Quote:As you do wildlife mostly, I am not sure if you do a lot of focus tracking


I hadn`t realised sticks move Smile Smile
justin c e2
11 4.6k 36 England
4 Aug 2012 5:22PM

Quote:I was looking at the Nikon D3 and the Canon 5D Mk II yesterday but both of them were well over the 2000 mark body only


The Canon 5D11 is closer to 1500 new, so should be closer to your budget if you're prepared to buy secondhand.

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