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Macro Lenses


Paul Morgan e2
13 15.7k 6 England
26 Jul 2012 7:06PM
Better to be to sharp than to soft, easier to soften than it is to sharpen Smile

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Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
26 Jul 2012 7:12PM
That's what I would have thought, Paul but maybe it's something to do with unsuitable bokeh or similar? Seemed odd at the time but nobody seemed to question it.
lawbert 7 1.7k 15 England
26 Jul 2012 7:44PM

Quote:One of the pros on here, a few years back.


Well he was right....
If I had only one lense to cover vitually every genre it would be a 100mm macro (a true 1:1 jobby!!)
User_Removed 4 4.6k 1 Scotland
26 Jul 2012 7:50PM

Quote:Anyway, just to go down a different tangent: does anyone here use a macro lens as a portrait lens as well? I have heard it said they are "too sharp" but that (if it is the case) is hardly a problem which can't be solved.

Quote:Anyway, just to go down a different tangent: does anyone here use a macro lens as a portrait lens as well? I have heard it said they are "too sharp" but that (if it is the case) is hardly a problem which can't be solved.


Yes.

The Nikkor 105mm f/2.8VR is a great portrait lens on an FX (full frame) camera.

Too sharp? In the sense that it produces an image which is sharper than you might want a portrait to be, I suppose you could claim that. But why would you want to.

Good portraiture is one (of the few??) genres of photography where more is probably done in post-processing than in the camera. There are whole expensive software programs designed to soften the image and remove the skin detail - but you can do exactly the same in Photoshop or Lightroom with great ease.

I'd rather have a sharp lens and soften in software than attempt to do the converse.

But the short answer is - Yes.
Bjarni 11 43 Scotland
26 Jul 2012 8:04PM
Both the Olymmpus Zuiko 35mm macro and 50mm macro offer 1:1 and I think it was the 50mm that was mentioned as a good portrait lens too. Could the suitability as a portrait lens be related to the 35mm equivalent viewpoint/crop factr difference?
Ade_Osman e2
11 4.5k 36 England
26 Jul 2012 9:22PM
Stepping in worried about saying anything, but bugger it here goes! Wink

I very often use the Tamron as a portrait lens........It actually better than the Canon EF 100mm f2.8 USM Macro Lens that the wife has. But then again and this will start another argument, the Tamron's better all round than the Canon......The only thing it has against it is the fact it extends lengthways and is a little noisy when used in auto focus, which is not something that bothers me a lot as I rarely use auto on it anyway. Optically, and this is just an opinion before anyone rips into me the Tamron is far superior!!!

That should get the lens Snobbist's knickers in a right old twist! Grin

Right I'm off to the galleries before I start another forum flan fight Wink

Ade
Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
26 Jul 2012 9:31PM
Thanks guys. The reason I asked was because I have in mind a macro lens (announced but not yet on sale). The price will probably be quite high... several hundreds. I do not do enough anything like enough purely macro work to justify spending so much money, but if it could double as a portrait lens, that would make it a more worthwhile purchase. Smile
Philh04 9 57
27 Jul 2012 8:33AM

Quote:I knew all this all the time Wink My 10 year old 90mm Tamron shows 1:1 on the distance scale, so on my D7000 I will get 1:1.5


No.... No.... No.... It will be 1:1, a crop sensor does not magically increase the magnification.....

Phil
Philh04 9 57
27 Jul 2012 11:15AM

Quote:My 65mm will give me 1:5, or is that 5:1?.......Even more on the 50d........

Ade (leaving room, banging head against wall, wishing I hadn't said anything in the first place.)



Nope it will still be 5x mag no matter what physical size of sensor you use it on.....

Phil
Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
27 Jul 2012 1:11PM

Quote:a crop sensor does not magically increase the magnification.....


But the angle of view is narrower using the same lens on a crop as opposed to FF.
oldblokeh 3 845 United Kingdom
27 Jul 2012 1:18PM

Quote:a crop sensor does not magically increase the magnification.....

But the angle of view is narrower using the same lens on a crop as opposed to FF.



The reproduction ratio compares the physical size of the object with the physical size of the image of the object on the sensor. That is to say, if the object size is 1mm long and the size of the image on the sensor is 1mm long, the the reproduction ratio is 1:1. The size of the sensor has nothing to do with it except insofar as it places constraints on the size of object than can be imaged at 1:1.
Carabosse e2
11 39.5k 269 England
27 Jul 2012 1:27PM
This is the sort of debate they get into on DPR............. usually interminable! Grin

When I put a 50mm lens onto a FF camera it will give me a certain size on the sensor. When I put that very same lens on an M4/3 camera, hey presto, the image is double the size on the sensor. Sounds pretty magical to me. Wink

Don't quite see why the same does not apply to a macro lens, but perhaps it's a matter of terminology?
Philh04 9 57
27 Jul 2012 1:32PM

Quote: But the angle of view is narrower using the same lens on a crop as opposed to FF.


More correctly Field of View Smile but that has nothing to do with magnification, no matter what size of sensor one is using at 1:1 a 1mm object will still reproduce at 1mm as oldblokeh states...

Phil
mikehit e2
5 6.8k 11 United Kingdom
27 Jul 2012 1:34PM
Naughty boy, CB - stop winding him up. Grin
Philh04 9 57
27 Jul 2012 1:38PM

Quote:This is the sort of debate they get into on DPR............. usually interminable! Grin

When I put a 50mm lens onto a FF camera it will give me a certain size on the sensor. When I put that very same lens on an M4/3 camera, hey presto, the image is double the size on the sensor. Sounds pretty magical to me. Wink

Don't quite see why the same does not apply to a macro lens, but perhaps it's a matter of terminology?



No its not double the size, given you have stayed in the same position the image projected onto the sensor is the same size, it is impossible for it to be double, its just that the M4/3 sensor sees less of the projected image...

Phil

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