Login or Join Now

Upload your photos, chat, win prizes and much more

Username:
Password:
Remember Me

Can't Access your Account?

New to ePHOTOzine? Join ePHOTOzine for free!

Like 0

Me again, weddings again!

Join Now

Join ePHOTOzine, the friendliest photography community.

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more for free!

pulsar69
pulsar69  101611 forum posts United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
17 Jan 2013 - 8:55 PM

Once again there seems to be a circling back to people mentioning the taking thousands of photos at a wedding, as I have mentioned and i have no doubt many other pro wedding togs can verify to take over 1000 photos with two photographers in 10 hours of work is not at all machine gunning and we are using our brains and eyes which is why we can still end up with 600 final edit images after the cull.

A wedding day for me is a myriad of emotions and excitement all of which we need to keep under control ourselves and concentrate whilst remaining calm throughout and being able to take the reigns when needed. By the end of the 10 hours + we are physically tired but normal completely exhausted mentally !

I will always be eager to progress and to say i couldn't get any better would be silly so i would always be looking to progress whether with new techniques new ideas or new equipment it all adds to the mix. There are always going to be a dozen newcomers snapping at our heals with fresh thoughts so to sit back and relax would simply be fatal.

A camera with much improved ISO would allow me to shoot more ambient shots in very low light without having to rely on any flash and remain sharp , therefore yes without a doubt better equipment will allow me to do that , does that make me a better photographer - well it provides better results for me so yes.

Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links 
17 Jan 2013 - 8:55 PM

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

paulcookphotography


Quote: does that make me a better photographer - well it provides better results for me so yes.

No, it provides opportunities. That does not automatically make you a better photographer. I'm not doubting you have the ability to get the results, but i disagree with the idea that the equipment makes you better. Surely you have learned how to balance ISO and aperture/shutter speed (or flash) in the past? So you already have the talent/skills. If you dont already, then you will obviously learn them. The new camera does not automatically update your abilities as soon as you hand over your credit card

pulsar69
pulsar69  101611 forum posts United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
17 Jan 2013 - 9:41 PM

Knowing how to balance things doesn't help when the situation does not allow , there are times when flash is banned and light is low and its just not possible to get round it , I photograph 50 weddings a year so have a pretty good idea of where my equipment meets its limits and hence know how i can improve with better equipment.

I guess i see it as making me better , the question of whether a client would actually be able to see it in the results and recognize it is a little more undecided, but if i can see it and can foresee the benefits and it becomes part of my style which is what we sell ourselves on then again I believe that makes me a better photographer.

In the perfect world i would like a camera that i can take out in my pocket every day that can shoot in darkness with no lack of quality and without artificial light and can replicate what the human eye can see in the way it can see it - that would make me a better photographer ! I only we could attach our eyes to an external drive Smile

ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade  1014708 forum posts England216 Constructive Critique Points
17 Jan 2013 - 11:41 PM

It's interesting how views differ - when i got the 5D2 I just felt poorer, not better Wink

I've not made any extra money as a result of having it

I've not taken any shots I couldn't have got previously

All depends on what you're doing - I see your point about the high ISO in churches, if you consider that as improving "you", it just makes me think of The Borg on star trek Wink Like you're plugged into the camera !

I do like the longer lasting batteries, and the 3 "custom presets" Smile

janeez
janeez e2 Member 51161 forum postsjaneez vcard United Kingdom8 Constructive Critique Points
18 Jan 2013 - 12:07 AM

It is interesting to look back at what you started with. Lets say for instance you start with a Kodak 227 instamatic camera. Nice little camera. My first one and it is sitting on a shelf in my living room. Can you upgrade from that? Yes. Mine was a Praktica MTL5. This was a definite upgrade from the instamatic. Next was a Minolta i something! Auto focus and an excellent camera except in very cold weather when it just would not work. Next was a Nikon D70 and move into the digital age. Great camera but nowhere near as good as the D80 which in turn is not as good as the D300s for many more technical reasons.

My point is I could have stuck with a Kodak instamatic or the Praktica but neither of these cameras could have remotely enabled me to do the photography I do today. For these reasons my photography improved because advances in technology allowed me to do so. The ideas have always have been there but the possibilities of creating them were far more limiting.

cameracat
cameracat  108578 forum posts Norfolk Island61 Constructive Critique Points
18 Jan 2013 - 12:13 AM

LOL...Grin

Do you want to read a funny story...???

Its about this guy who claims to be the big I am in wedding photography.....Smile

Claims to have been " Doing Film " before digital to....Sad

Then you check out the history of forum posts by said " Big I Am " .....PMSL & ROFLMAO, It seems that only a few short years ago, He was asking some pretty basic questions, Like Wots DOF..Smile

Wots aperture all about, Heck the list is endless, Have a look for your self.....!!!!!!!!!!!!

The years roll by and the comedy just gets repetitive.....Tongue

Sometimes the old mouth just gets translated into keyboard actions of regret..Wink

paulcookphotography


Quote: It is interesting to look back at what you started with. Lets say for instance you start with a Kodak 227 instamatic camera. Nice little camera. My first one and it is sitting on a shelf in my living room. Can you upgrade from that? Yes. Mine was a Praktica MTL5. This was a definite upgrade from the instamatic. Next was a Minolta i something! Auto focus and an excellent camera except in very cold weather when it just would not work. Next was a Nikon D70 and move into the digital age. Great camera but nowhere near as good as the D80 which in turn is not as good as the D300s for many more technical reasons.

My point is I could have stuck with a Kodak instamatic or the Praktica but neither of these cameras could have remotely enabled me to do the photography I do today. For these reasons my photography improved because advances in technology allowed me to do so. The ideas have always have been there but the possibilities of creating them were far more limiting.

I still have some of my old cameras in amongst an ever growing (or breeding) collection of oldies, and obviously throughout the years i have upgraded and replaced. However rarely did a new camera or piece of kit suddenly 'make me better'. My learning, practice and understanding of photography combined with a developing style and artistic eye made me a 'better' photographer, which is why i am now comfortable with pretty much any camera i pick up no matter how basic or advanced. Its a tool for recording what i tell it to and how i want it to. Yes, resolution gets better with newer sensors, but its just a recording and not the art. Its like saying George Lucas would have been better if Blue Ray was about in the 70's.

As you say, your early cameras wouldnt allow you what you do today, but you wouldnt be able to do what you do with whatever camera you currently use without learning, developing and practice.

I wonder what would happen if i gave my daughter, who is starting to get an eye for photography and art, the latest dSLR? Would she suddenly be better? No, she would be bewildered with all the settings and technicalities of a full-blown SLR as its something she has to learn just as much as she develops her artistic style.

Although i guess for some the latest kit makes them better, like a boy racer in a new car turns him into Schumacher

KathyW
KathyW  101793 forum posts Norfolk Island12 Constructive Critique Points
18 Jan 2013 - 1:17 AM

I won't be getting a new and "better" camera until I am absolutely sure that I have wrung everything I possibly can out of the one I have now. Only had it a couple of years so there is still much to learn Smile It must be rather frustrating to be continually hankering after the next model, bearing in mind how the manufacturers seem to bring a new one out every other year...How do people keep up?

If I thought I could manage to carry the thing around and could afford to buy and develop the plates I would get myself one of those big wooden box cameras... I think that would improve my photography more than a 5Dmk3.

pulsar69
pulsar69  101611 forum posts United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
18 Jan 2013 - 8:09 AM

Camercat , if you bothered to read posts you would realise i was posting questions 7 years ago before i ever became a wedding photographer when i got my and one of the very first digital cameras. And to say i claim to be the big I am is ridiculous, I have said on numerous occasions that i want to get better and improve. You obviously have some issues you need to sort out don't bother bringing them my way and boring me with them.

pulsar69
pulsar69  101611 forum posts United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
18 Jan 2013 - 8:40 AM


Quote: It's interesting how views differ - when i got the 5D2 I just felt poorer, not better Wink

I've not made any extra money as a result of having it

I've not taken any shots I couldn't have got previously

All depends on what you're doing - I see your point about the high ISO in churches, if you consider that as improving "you", it just makes me think of The Borg on star trek Wink Like you're plugged into the camera !

I do like the longer lasting batteries, and the 3 "custom presets" Smile

Really Ade ? I feel the 5D2 was a massively leap from the 5D, just the fact you could view your images on the screen properly and see some detail was a big help ! We have literally battered our 5D2s and will be looking for replacements soon so the hunt for the next camera is on , although there is still the option of getting a very good 5d2 used bargain , but the thought of the little extra iso is very appealing ...

Oh and i am not sitting thinking of being plugged into 7 of 9 , great thoughts Wink

JJGEE
JJGEE  96205 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
18 Jan 2013 - 8:44 AM


Quote: Only had it a couple of years so there is still much to learn Smile

Surely it only takes a couple of days at most reading the manual and trying out setting the different feature options to learn about a camera.

Focus_Man
Focus_Man  4481 forum posts United Kingdom631 Constructive Critique Points
18 Jan 2013 - 9:03 AM


Quote: LOL...Grin Do you want to read a funny story...???

Nice one and well remembered.

KathyW
KathyW  101793 forum posts Norfolk Island12 Constructive Critique Points
18 Jan 2013 - 9:39 AM


Quote: Only had it a couple of years so there is still much to learn Smile
Surely it only takes a couple of days at most reading the manual and trying out setting the different feature options to learn about a camera.

But much, much longer to learn how to take a good photograph with it...

RichardN00
RichardN00 e2 Member 8417 forum postsRichardN00 vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
18 Jan 2013 - 10:03 AM


Quote: Only had it a couple of years so there is still much to learn Smile
Surely it only takes a couple of days at most reading the manual and trying out setting the different feature options to learn about a camera.

But much, much longer to learn how to take a good photograph with it...

Someone once said "Anything worth doing will only take a short time to learn, but but may take a lifetime to master" Smile

paulcookphotography


Quote:

Someone once said "Anything worth doing will only take a short time to learn, but but may take a lifetime to master" Smile

Which goes back to the question about upgrading/replacing equipment to keep up with the market when your current equipment is not restricting you. From when i worked in camera shops and even now offering private tuition and group trips, i have seen so many photographers (beginners and more experienced alike) buying the latest kit thinking that will somehow make them better. Almost to the point where they start to think that the newer the kit, the less you need to do. The fundamentals of photography (and what makes you a photographer) dont change. What changes is the occasional feature on a camera and its sensor. That alone does not make YOU better, it simply gives you a better tool.

But a good tool in the hands of a poor user will only result in a higher quality recording of a mediocre shot. Similarly, a good tool in the hands of a good photographer will give them a higher quality recording of a good shot. Their photography is still the same.

Add a Comment

You must be a member to leave a comment

Username:
Password:
Remember me:
Un-tick this box if you want to login each time you visit.