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Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315362 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
17 Jan 2013 - 7:38 PM


Quote: When you want to use anything larger than 35mm, the price of a half-decent scanner will rocket

Thats why I said not to bother buying one, unless your likely to be using one heck of a lot of film Smile

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17 Jan 2013 - 7:38 PM

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Andysnapper
Andysnapper e2 Member 6100 forum postsAndysnapper vcard England18 Constructive Critique Points
23 Jan 2013 - 10:58 AM

Epson V500 scanners are about 150 for a new one, pays for itself after 15 films and you get control over the scan.

As to MF itself, I have used many different types over the past few years and at the moment I am using a Mamiya C330f which I bought from bay-e with an 80mm lens, paramender (thing to correct the viewing angle when shooting close-ups or portraits) and case for 225. I have since bought another 3 lenses all of which are superbly sharp.
Yashicamat cameras are superb as well and can be had for very little. I wouldn't worry about a light meter, just get a nice little Sekonic L208 Twinmate, dead simple to use and really accurate.
If you fancy a folder have a look at Ross Ensign cameras. The 16-20 (6 x 4.5 negs), the 12-20 (6 x 6 negs, or the 820 (6 x 9 negs) are all available very reasonably and have probably the best lenses of any British camera.

Don't worry about a lightmeter, they are usually more accurate than the ones in old cameras and you soon get used to using them. I hadn't used one until 18 months ago and its second nature now.

Cheers

Andy

User_Removed
24 Jan 2013 - 9:37 AM

....just a comment on the Exposure Meter thing. You will get a Russian one (Leningrad-4 or similar) for under a fiver on eBay and it will be good enough for most film purposes. If you are doubtful about its accuracy, cross-calibrate it with the meter of your digital camera and work out a degree of exposure compensation to apply if necessary.

Sooty_1
Sooty_1 Critique Team 41207 forum posts United Kingdom198 Constructive Critique Points
24 Jan 2013 - 10:47 AM

You can even get a light meter app for your phone. With a little experience, you can tell if its giving you good info. To start with, you can use 'sunny16' which is surprisingly accurate (you can download mini aide-memoires to keep in the camera case), but a cheap light meter will serve perfectly well.

I use a Weston V with a cone (for incident metering) for large format.

Nick

sdb
sdb  6109 forum posts United Kingdom
24 Jan 2013 - 11:14 AM

+1 for the Weston V - I picked up one in perfect condition with cone and cases for 6 on ebay.

KangaRU
KangaRU e2 Member 7KangaRU vcard United Kingdom
3 Feb 2013 - 9:58 PM

The scans from most film developers a low res and not very good, in the long run it pays to get a half decent scanner it will pay for its self I use the Epson V750 Pro for scanning my 120 and 35mm film.

User_Removed
3 Feb 2013 - 10:40 PM


Quote: The scans from most film developers a low res and not very good, in the long run it pays to get a half decent scanner it will pay for its self I use the Epson V750 Pro for scanning my 120 and 35mm film.

That was certainly my experience too.

Canon4me
Canon4me  1 United Kingdom
1 Mar 2013 - 11:23 PM

I've got a Bronica etrsi which is 6x4.5, and a Mamiya which is square format and twin lens. Although the Mamiya is very old it was built to last and you can pick one up cheap, a fair bit cheaper than a Bronica. Earlier on there was a Mamiya C330 with just one bid of 70 on ebay

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315362 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
2 Mar 2013 - 1:42 AM


Quote: The scans from most film developers a low res and not very good, in the long run it pays to get a half decent scanner it will pay for its self I use the Epson V750 Pro for scanning my 120 and 35mm film

Just get a light box, lay your negatives in your scanner, place light box on top and upside down, works a treat Smile

thewilliam
2 Mar 2013 - 9:50 AM


Quote: ....just a comment on the Exposure Meter thing. You will get a Russian one (Leningrad-4 or similar) for under a fiver on eBay and it will be good enough for most film purposes. If you are doubtful about its accuracy, cross-calibrate it with the meter of your digital camera and work out a degree of exposure compensation to apply if necessary.

I remember a video of Annie Liebowitz at work in which she was shooting on medium-format but using a Nikon camera as a lightmeter. A very sensible method because Nikon's built-in metering has always been good.

Last Modified By thewilliam at 2 Mar 2013 - 9:52 AM
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phil44
phil44  8 United Kingdom
12 Apr 2014 - 3:14 PM

Over my "Film" life I used a few MF cameras including TLR's from Yashica, Rollie and Mamiya, but my favourite of all was my Bronica ETRSi 6 x 4.5 format. I still have it although sadly it hasn't been used for a couple of years.
6 x 6 format is OK but I found that I was usually cropping to rectangular anyway and the 6 x 4.5 was a little more compact and lighter.

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