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Medium format advice


Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
17 Jan 2013 7:38PM

Quote:When you want to use anything larger than 35mm, the price of a half-decent scanner will rocket


Thats why I said not to bother buying one, unless your likely to be using one heck of a lot of film Smile

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Andysnapper e2
6 108 22 England
23 Jan 2013 10:58AM
Epson V500 scanners are about 150 for a new one, pays for itself after 15 films and you get control over the scan.

As to MF itself, I have used many different types over the past few years and at the moment I am using a Mamiya C330f which I bought from bay-e with an 80mm lens, paramender (thing to correct the viewing angle when shooting close-ups or portraits) and case for 225. I have since bought another 3 lenses all of which are superbly sharp.
Yashicamat cameras are superb as well and can be had for very little. I wouldn't worry about a light meter, just get a nice little Sekonic L208 Twinmate, dead simple to use and really accurate.
If you fancy a folder have a look at Ross Ensign cameras. The 16-20 (6 x 4.5 negs), the 12-20 (6 x 6 negs, or the 820 (6 x 9 negs) are all available very reasonably and have probably the best lenses of any British camera.

Don't worry about a lightmeter, they are usually more accurate than the ones in old cameras and you soon get used to using them. I hadn't used one until 18 months ago and its second nature now.

Cheers

Andy
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
24 Jan 2013 9:37AM
....just a comment on the Exposure Meter thing. You will get a Russian one (Leningrad-4 or similar) for under a fiver on eBay and it will be good enough for most film purposes. If you are doubtful about its accuracy, cross-calibrate it with the meter of your digital camera and work out a degree of exposure compensation to apply if necessary.
Sooty_1 e2
4 1.3k 203 United Kingdom
24 Jan 2013 10:47AM
You can even get a light meter app for your phone. With a little experience, you can tell if its giving you good info. To start with, you can use 'sunny16' which is surprisingly accurate (you can download mini aide-memoires to keep in the camera case), but a cheap light meter will serve perfectly well.

I use a Weston V with a cone (for incident metering) for large format.

Nick
sdb e2
7 110 United Kingdom
24 Jan 2013 11:14AM
+1 for the Weston V - I picked up one in perfect condition with cone and cases for 6 on ebay.
3 Feb 2013 9:58PM
The scans from most film developers a low res and not very good, in the long run it pays to get a half decent scanner it will pay for its self I use the Epson V750 Pro for scanning my 120 and 35mm film.
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
3 Feb 2013 10:40PM

Quote:The scans from most film developers a low res and not very good, in the long run it pays to get a half decent scanner it will pay for its self I use the Epson V750 Pro for scanning my 120 and 35mm film.


That was certainly my experience too.
1 Mar 2013 11:23PM
I've got a Bronica etrsi which is 6x4.5, and a Mamiya which is square format and twin lens. Although the Mamiya is very old it was built to last and you can pick one up cheap, a fair bit cheaper than a Bronica. Earlier on there was a Mamiya C330 with just one bid of 70 on ebay
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
2 Mar 2013 1:42AM

Quote:The scans from most film developers a low res and not very good, in the long run it pays to get a half decent scanner it will pay for its self I use the Epson V750 Pro for scanning my 120 and 35mm film


Just get a light box, lay your negatives in your scanner, place light box on top and upside down, works a treat Smile
thewilliam e2
6 4.9k
2 Mar 2013 9:50AM

Quote:....just a comment on the Exposure Meter thing. You will get a Russian one (Leningrad-4 or similar) for under a fiver on eBay and it will be good enough for most film purposes. If you are doubtful about its accuracy, cross-calibrate it with the meter of your digital camera and work out a degree of exposure compensation to apply if necessary.


I remember a video of Annie Liebowitz at work in which she was shooting on medium-format but using a Nikon camera as a lightmeter. A very sensible method because Nikon's built-in metering has always been good.
2 Mar 2013 1:05PM
Check out these two websites:

http://www.zenit-camera.com/kiev_cameras.htm

http://www.kievusa.com/
phil44 e2
8 6 United Kingdom
12 Apr 2014 3:14PM
Over my "Film" life I used a few MF cameras including TLR's from Yashica, Rollie and Mamiya, but my favourite of all was my Bronica ETRSi 6 x 4.5 format. I still have it although sadly it hasn't been used for a couple of years.
6 x 6 format is OK but I found that I was usually cropping to rectangular anyway and the 6 x 4.5 was a little more compact and lighter.

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