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Member of the Week - theorderingone - 21st March - 28th March 2011

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ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade  1014554 forum posts England216 Constructive Critique Points
22 Mar 2011 - 6:32 PM

I did live at leeds last year actually - though didn't see too many bands, which was stupid, but I went with a mate I'd not seen in months so was outside drinking at most of the venues!

Punks used to be famous for gobbing at bands - as a photographer, have you ever been a victim of stray gob?

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22 Mar 2011 - 6:32 PM

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theorderingone
22 Mar 2011 - 7:02 PM

No stray gob, but I have had bottles or water/drinks poured over me/thrown at me.

The worst is the stuff that comes flying out of the crowd into the pit, especially at festivals. If it ain't cold, it ain't beer :-(

Last Modified By theorderingone at 22 Mar 2011 - 7:03 PM
Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1214388 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
22 Mar 2011 - 7:27 PM

Have you ever been arrested or chucked out of a venue.

theorderingone
22 Mar 2011 - 8:12 PM

Hehe, sorry to disappoint Paul. I'm just not that rock and roll Wink

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1214388 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
22 Mar 2011 - 8:18 PM

Lol so your still a fledgeling who`s yet to earn his wings Smile

theorderingone
22 Mar 2011 - 9:23 PM

Haha, maybe. I try to behave myself when working, after all I see it as me being an invited guest.

If invited round for dinner, would you get arrested/removed from the venue? Wink

ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade  1014554 forum posts England216 Constructive Critique Points
23 Mar 2011 - 1:21 AM

you like teaching.....

what 5 areas of photography would you cover first, given someone who's just bought a DSLR and wants tuition - there's no timescale, you could do it in one lesson or over several

theorderingone
23 Mar 2011 - 1:45 AM

If someone's just bought an SLR and doesn't know how to use it, then it's best to start with the very basics of exposure, I find.

I also find it helps if there's an understanding mechanically of what's going on in the camera, so I'd start off with things like what an aperture is and the effect it has, what different shutter speeds do, and what effect changing the ISO has.

Then I suppose some simple ways to evaluate and adjust exposure, such as using the histogram on screen and using exposure compensation to make simple adjustments in A, S or P mode.

I'm guessing you mean things like landscapes/portraits/macro though? When I do teach, I use relevant examples from allsorts of areas of photography to help explain why you may change a setting, for example, with sports, you need a faster shutter speed, so in order to achieve that you may need to open the aperture, or increase the ISO, or both.

Some basic guides to composition I find are often useful, but as that part of photography is subjective, there are no rules, only rules of thumb such as the rule of thirds etc.

With the basic grounding in place, it should be easy to adapt to any area of photography, as much of it is common sense Wink

Does that make sense? I'm tired after shooting a gig Wink

ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade  1014554 forum posts England216 Constructive Critique Points
23 Mar 2011 - 1:51 AM

lol - you're still up..... and so am I, lots of wine tonight, mate just gone home!

It's a completely open question really, I've had a few total newbies to show around a camera and it's interesting to see how they react to certain things and what works best - it's usually the balance between "techy" and "artistic" that you need to gauge.

i.e. exposure or compostion - not that they're unrelated, but they are different things to teach initially

bed time anyway

Smile

theorderingone
23 Mar 2011 - 2:12 AM

Hehe, I barely ever sleep Wink

StrayCat
StrayCat  1014201 forum posts Canada2 Constructive Critique Points
23 Mar 2011 - 4:04 AM

What do you think is the ideal lens for what you do? If you have it, tell us about it; if you don't, you may still tell us.Wink

doladar
doladar  4
23 Mar 2011 - 5:46 AM

Hi i was just wondering how you got into shooting bands. you see that is what i would love to get into here i was going with a drummer in a band and i took some photos for them but none of mine were as good as yours. I have looked under tips of how to take low lighting in bars and stuff where they play at but some of mine didnt come out right. That is what i want to get into because you dont find too many advertising for band you see a lot of wedding, portrait, but not to much of that i would love to work with a photographer to learn the ropes and all. Because i think i could learn more by watching and seeing how a real professional works and maybe one day i will get to do that. i just wanted to say i would love to get as good as you . mary dennis

theorderingone
23 Mar 2011 - 10:00 AM


Quote: What do you think is the ideal lens for what you do? If you have it, tell us about it; if you don't, you may still tell us.

There's no such thing as the ideal lens, their are many lenses that do a great job under the right circumstances though.

For most indoor gigs, I notice most photographers get by with a 24-70mm f/2.8 (or 17-55mm f/2.8 on APS-C) and this covers most small to medium-large venues. Then for festivals or arenas they'll add a 70-200mm f/2.8.

I seem to approach things slightly differently, using a mix of zooms and primes. The zooms I almost always have in my bag are my Nikon 20-35mm f/2.8 and my Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 VR. With those I'll have a Sigma 24mm f/1.8, Nikon 35mm f/2, Nikon 50mm f/1.4 and a Nikon 85mm f/1.8.

I also have a Nikon 35-70mm f/2.8 which I tend to use to cover the midrange at festivals, where the lighting will normally be helped by daylight, and a Nikon 135mm f/2 DC which is useful when the VR on the 70-200mm is no use, such as for more active performers.

That way I have a good range of bright primes, with my range extended at either end by the zooms if the lighting's good enough.

theorderingone
23 Mar 2011 - 10:11 AM


Quote: Hi i was just wondering how you got into shooting bands. you see that is what i would love to get into here i was going with a drummer in a band and i took some photos for them but none of mine were as good as yours. I have looked under tips of how to take low lighting in bars and stuff where they play at but some of mine didnt come out right. That is what i want to get into because you dont find too many advertising for band you see a lot of wedding, portrait, but not to much of that i would love to work with a photographer to learn the ropes and all. Because i think i could learn more by watching and seeing how a real professional works and maybe one day i will get to do that. i just wanted to say i would love to get as good as you . mary dennis

Hi Mary.

I got started (as I'm sure is true for many doing what I do) by snapping pics of a friends band and working my way up.

If you haven't got any friends in a band, go to your local small venue that puts on unsigned bands and ask the bands if they mind you taking a few pictures. Most will be happy to do this, especially if you offer to send over a couple of the images for their Myspace/Facebook/Tumblr/etc. Or even try contacting these unsigned bands through their Myspace/Facebook/Tumblr/etc.

Then when the pictures you're taking start to get better, try approaching local fanzines and website that deal with the local music scene. Most publications like this will be able to get you passes into local gigs, which will give you your first taste of what to expect.

If you do this, and work at it, you'll bump into plenty of photographers. In my experience I tend to find the ones who are good at what they do are generally helpful, and those that are insecure generally aren't.

Practice makes perfect I'm afraid. So it may take some time before you're getting the images you're after, but if you stick at it, you'll feel all the more satisfied for it.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1214388 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
23 Mar 2011 - 11:11 AM


Quote: I seem to approach things slightly differently, using a mix of zooms and primes. The zooms I almost always have in my bag are my Nikon 20-35mm f/2.8 and my Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 VR. With those I'll have a Sigma 24mm f/1.8, Nikon 35mm f/2, Nikon 50mm f/1.4 and a Nikon 85mm f/1.8

You carry a few fast primes, have you ever considered adding a lensbaby to your collection.

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