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Monitor Calibration Tips

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Nick_w
Nick_w e2 Member 73818 forum postsNick_w vcard England99 Constructive Critique Points
1 Jan 2011 - 6:39 PM

Use the Spider Chris. Just done the same myself (tho using colormunki) took a while to get the profile just right.

Is it 64bit your running on Windows 7 - if so download the most upto date drivers - that was my initial problems.

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1 Jan 2011 - 6:39 PM

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contemporary dave

I feel rather reassured about your post that I'm not the only person who is experiencing problems!

I've got one of these monitors and I'm still not totally happy with the calibration - and I'm using the same calibrator you've got on W7 and an Nvidia graphics card.

What I have found helps getting the setup right is this: http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles/icc_profiles.htm . Scroll down, use the suggested settings and then calibrate again. Its helped a lot. However, I'm still having problems with viewing all photos and graphics on the web (I use Int Explorer & Firefox). The reds/oranges are over-saturated and I'm at an absolute loss as to how to sort this out. The LP2475 has got great reviews, but this issue is really bugging me.

I'm currently using my old cheap Viewsonic VP930 which has none of the above problems. It calibrates perfectly with no bold reds.

justin c
justin c  104512 forum posts England36 Constructive Critique Points
1 Jan 2011 - 6:54 PM

The secret to getting accurate colours when browsing the web, is to use a browser that is colour managed, i.e. Firefox. Make sure you enable colour management in Firefox. The exact method escapes me now but a Google search should reveal the process. If this isn't done you will have particularly over-saturated colours (mostly reds) as you've already discovered.

Regarding the calibration of the HP2475, I'm using a Gretag Macbeth Eyeone Display 2, so I don't know how the process with the Spyder differs. The method I use is to restore the monitor's default settings, in case anything has been incorrectly altered. Calibrate to a luminance of 100 cd/m2 and Native White Point. DO NOT alter the contrast or the seperate R, G, B, values. Any advice to alter the R, G, B, settings is incorrect. CRT monitors were calibrated that way but not an LCD monitor such as the HP2475. The brightness will need to be adjusted to achieve the desired target luminance value but ideally it shouldn't fall below 20% for optimum results.

Last Modified By justin c at 1 Jan 2011 - 6:56 PM
contemporary dave


Quote: The secret to getting accurate colours when browsing the web, is to use a browser that is colour managed, i.e. Firefox. Make sure you enable colour management in Firefox. The exact method escapes me now but a Google search should reveal the process. If this isn't done you will have particularly over-saturated colours (mostly reds) as you've already discovered.



Thanks for that, but why is it that on my calibrated Viewsonic monitor, colours on the web look spot on whilst the HP has this red issue?

justin c
justin c  104512 forum posts England36 Constructive Critique Points
1 Jan 2011 - 7:18 PM


Quote: but why is it that on my calibrated Viewsonic monitor, colours on the web look spot on whilst the HP has this red issue?

The reason is because the HP is a wide-gamut monitor.

Last Modified By justin c at 1 Jan 2011 - 7:19 PM
Jestertheclown

Firefox colour management.

There was a thread on here some time ago regarding calibrating monitors and using the above add-on was applauded by some and slated as a waste of time by others.
I have it installed and have never used it; as such it apparently sets itself to sRGB by default.
I say "apparently" because I know nothing about calibratring monitors but that's what I was told in the other thread.
I have to say though, that the colours here (on my cheap, uncalibrated monitor) using Firefox do look more natural than they do on IE.

GlennH
GlennH  91890 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
1 Jan 2011 - 7:33 PM

Chris, less is more in calibration, which is why the Spyder is only asking for brightness changes - because it's a hardware adjustment that doesn't introduce artefacts and banding like any other adjustment potentially will. All other adjustments to your screen are software adjustments made through the GPU, which calibration tools may or may not use in moderation.

This is also the reason that many people recommend setting your monitor to a native white point and native gamma, because apart from the fact that these settings allow your display to reach its full potential in terms of colour, it also doesn't make any artificial adjustment. If you subequently have problems matching screen to print because of colour temperature, you can try a more standardised setting like 6500K.

There's also no 'ideal' luminance level. A measurement of 120cd/m² is often mentioned, but if you're doing any precise matching - by definition you're calibrating the screen for your own output and viewing conditions. That said, 100-140cd/m² are good ballpark targets to get you away from overly bright factory settings.

Last Modified By GlennH at 1 Jan 2011 - 7:38 PM
Alan_Warriner

Doesn't this make a bit of a mockery of colour calibration?

Two calibrated monitors with different colours, how can you know which one is correct?

Did the first one actually have under saturated reds, or is the second one at fault as you say?

At the end of it all you are effectively doing it by eye

This isn't having a go at you Chris, I just think that colour management is often seen (and sold) as so important

Last Modified By Alan_Warriner at 1 Jan 2011 - 9:08 PM
Nick_w
Nick_w e2 Member 73818 forum postsNick_w vcard England99 Constructive Critique Points
1 Jan 2011 - 9:16 PM

Your new monitor probably has a much wider Gamut so can resolve more colours.

How does the print look compared to the screen ?

cameracat
cameracat  108578 forum posts Norfolk Island61 Constructive Critique Points
1 Jan 2011 - 9:22 PM

The settings will be better once you have run the burn in period ( around 200 to 400 hours Sad Seems like a lifetime )..!

Here are some settings you could try until then ( or check anyhow ).

Brightness 47.
Contrast 80.

Black Luminance 0.29
White Luminance 120.0

Gamma 2.2

Kelvin 6500k.

Thats leaving the colour temp at 6500k basically.

Later when its fully burned in, You could do a custom set-up if your still not happy.

On the machine my 2475 is attached to there is a Nvidia graphic card 9600GT, That is exactly as installed with no adjustments via the driver control panel.

Though you may have a point about the Digital Vibrance, For some time I have noticed that my monitors attached to other computers running " ATI " graphic cards, Are less of a pain to calibrate, The ATI boards are mid range 5770 models and one 4670 model, I used to be a total Nvidia only bod, But not anymore my ATI graphic boards seem much better and more stable than previous Nvidia samples, That said we have one machine running with a Nvidia 8600GT and thats been and still is fine.

However my plan is to switch to ATI (AMD) Exclusively, But first up I'm sorting the machines that are running " AMD " chipsets, As these seem to work much better with the ATI graphic boards......Grin

I'm a tad suspicious that this is not accidental either.....But something in the design of the AMD based chipset mainboards.....!!!

Whatever.....The point about " Wide Gamut " monitors has some relevance, But once you have it sorted there is almost no detectable drift.....!

HTH Wink

EDIT: Just a thought Chris, Are you running the " Version 4 " software for Spyder 3 Elite.....? ? ?

I was a tad miffed at having forking out for a software upgrade so soon, But the difference in the program and the results are very noticable, So for the 19 quid extra its well worth biting the bullet.....Smile

Last Modified By cameracat at 1 Jan 2011 - 9:34 PM
cameracat
cameracat  108578 forum posts Norfolk Island61 Constructive Critique Points
1 Jan 2011 - 9:40 PM

Ah! The HP software......Sad I don't use anything from the disc that came with it.....I did try once when I first got the monitor, Seem to remember a lot of cursing, Before the uninstall.

Do have a look at the monitors own page on the HP site, There is some updated stuff " INF " files and the original ICC profile, I made sure it had that before running the Spyder on it for the first time, Also there should be an update for Win 7 regarding the USB hub, Though mine came via Windows Update.

I'll have a rumage around and see if I can find the page link.....Smile

cameracat
cameracat  108578 forum posts Norfolk Island61 Constructive Critique Points
1 Jan 2011 - 9:44 PM

Here ya go Chris......Da Link, You should find everything you need right here......Smile

There is indeed a new Win 7 driver....!

As far as firmware goes its a factory job apparently, But models as late as yours should not need updating.

Mine is a GIG 068 version, Now showing over 3500 hours running time.....Wink

Last Modified By cameracat at 1 Jan 2011 - 9:51 PM
GlennH
GlennH  91890 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
1 Jan 2011 - 10:23 PM

Just to throw something else into the mix - there are stories on the internet of NVIDIA drivers kicking in late at startup, with the net result that third-party calibration data gets knocked out. The threads I've seen on this date back to the time of Windows Vista and XP, but it's perhaps worth looking into.

Also Chris, The Spyder is doing far more than just getting you to adjust brightness. Whatever calibration settings you select, they get loaded into the video card LUT at startup via what is known as a vcgt tag. Obviously anything colour related that loads after this is likely to do damage.

After calibration, the Spyder goes on to create your ICC profile, which fine-tunes the colour in applications like Photoshop. The profile is obviously undermined if your calibration settings have been skewed.

Last Modified By GlennH at 1 Jan 2011 - 10:33 PM
GlennH
GlennH  91890 forum posts France1 Constructive Critique Points
2 Jan 2011 - 3:23 PM

I wouldn't give up just yet, Chris, particularly if it's possibly your NVIDIA card causing the problem. I found this last night, which may or may not be useful.

Also, check this out.

Nick_w
Nick_w e2 Member 73818 forum postsNick_w vcard England99 Constructive Critique Points
2 Jan 2011 - 3:57 PM

Chris when you say the reds are oversaturated, are you talking about in Photoshop or viewing on the web?

I tell you why I ask I've just moved to an IPS monitor and when you open an sRGB image in Photoshop with a wide gamut (prophoto or adobe) with convert to profile set the reds go nuclear. It's also a problem if converting to sRGB in Photoshop for web upload it looks ghastly but in CS5 there's a function for viewing in your browser when the image looks as it should.

Last Modified By Nick_w at 2 Jan 2011 - 3:58 PM

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