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More blemishes on TZ7 photos

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    guidoa
    guidoa  121331 forum posts United Kingdom
    24 Aug 2012 - 6:57 PM

    Recently I uploaded a photo with some blemishes which it was suggested were caused by shadows. The 2 marks on this photo appear on most photos. Just wondering if anyone can suggest the cause? Thanks

    sofl.jpg

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    Pete
    Pete Site Moderator 1318446 forum postsPete vcard ePz Advertiser England96 Constructive Critique Points
    24 Aug 2012 - 7:12 PM

    Those look very much like dust spots either on the rear element of the lens or on the sensor or trapped somewhere in between the light path from lens to sensor.

    guidoa
    guidoa  121331 forum posts United Kingdom
    24 Aug 2012 - 7:25 PM

    Thanks Pete, I assume that as this is a compact it is not practical to clean it

    Pete
    Pete Site Moderator 1318446 forum postsPete vcard ePz Advertiser England96 Constructive Critique Points
    24 Aug 2012 - 7:39 PM

    it's not going to be easy. You could try using a can of compressed jet air (not seen them around for a while but I'm sure you can still buy them) And try to blow into the lens area in the hope that the construction has gaps for the lens movements etc and reaches through to the dust spots. But taking it apart to clean will be a costly job and possibly not worth it.

    Niknut
    Niknut e2 Member 4602 forum postsNiknut vcard United Kingdom63 Constructive Critique Points
    24 Aug 2012 - 7:45 PM

    Almost certainly dust/debris on the sensor itself !!!!.....bear in mind the sensor is only about 6mmx4mm, so these spots are VERY tiny ????

    I don't know whether a compact sensor could be cleaned, but I doubt it ??

    You could try gently 'bumping' the base of the camera against the 'heel' of your hand (with everything switched off, & remove the battery & card first) to see
    if it will dislodge the debris ?.....then take a test shot of a sheet of grey/white plain paper to see if they're still there, or moved position ???

    The only alternative is to clone out the marks on every image !!....time consuming, but not difficult !!

    guidoa
    guidoa  121331 forum posts United Kingdom
    24 Aug 2012 - 9:52 PM

    As there are about 300 images with these marks, I dont envisage cloning them out! I'll try shaking the camera about!

    Carabosse
    Carabosse e2 Member 1139461 forum postsCarabosse vcard England269 Constructive Critique Points
    25 Aug 2012 - 12:00 AM

    Used the spot healing brush in PS to get rid of the spots - took about 2 seconds. Smile

    I also straightened the horizon and tweaked it a little.

    1-sofl-rev.jpg

    MGJ
    MGJ  6136 forum posts5 Constructive Critique Points
    25 Aug 2012 - 11:10 AM

    As a last resort a garage air compressor will give you enough air. You can get enough draught around the body by finding a hole somewhere in the camera, and by using a proper air jet nozzle!(Sounds special but everyone has one). The only thing is do check that the air is filtered - suitable for paint spraying, because that will have a dust filter and a water trap and that will be really clean abrasive free air.

    Have fixed wife's and daughters compacts that live in the bottom of handbags on occasion like that. Give it a squirt through any of the card openings and extended lens ring. Probably best not to hit it with 200psig first attempt either, because at very high pressures you can start shifting small wires. Still one has little to lose. I have also removed dust from the inside of a DSLR lens too, so it works well enough, but its at your own risk of course.

    Very handy for speeding up slow laptops as well - shifting the dust and encouraging decent heat dissipation.

    MeanGreeny
    25 Aug 2012 - 12:22 PM


    Quote: As a last resort a garage air compressor will give you enough air. You can get enough draught around the body by finding a hole somewhere in the camera, and by using a proper air jet nozzle!(Sounds special but everyone has one). The only thing is do check that the air is filtered - suitable for paint spraying, because that will have a dust filter and a water trap and that will be really clean abrasive free air.

    Have fixed wife's and daughters compacts that live in the bottom of handbags on occasion like that. Give it a squirt through any of the card openings and extended lens ring. Probably best not to hit it with 200psig first attempt either, because at very high pressures you can start shifting small wires. Still one has little to lose. I have also removed dust from the inside of a DSLR lens too, so it works well enough, but its at your own risk of course.

    Very handy for speeding up slow laptops as well - shifting the dust and encouraging decent heat dissipation.

    Dust and water are likely to be the least of the problems. Oil droplets leaking through the seals in the compressor could easily coat a film over the sensor.

    Stick to canned, pure air

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