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MichaelMelb_AU
12 Jul 2013 - 12:31 AM


Quote:
...Looking at what Canon have done with the 70D it would not be a surprise to see an entry level camera using the same sensor but with no mirror and an EVF. That would allow them to recoup much of the technology cost across a number of cameras, helping to cut the impact of R&D costs on profit.

I liked your concise analysis. And I think your prediction is spot-on too - considering they already laid out the foundations of the process with their EOS-M. Although I found this particular model not up to competitors - such as NEX and MFTs, I am watching developments with interest. Who knows, I may need to change the type of my auxiliary camera in the future...

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12 Jul 2013 - 12:31 AM

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Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315362 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
12 Jul 2013 - 1:11 AM


Quote: considering they already laid out the foundations of the process with their EOS-M. Although I found this particular model not up to competitors

It was much the same as the introduction of the EP1, I`m sure the next EOS-M will be a whole lot better than its first, it was only its focusing speed that hampered it.

MichaelMelb_AU
12 Jul 2013 - 1:30 AM


Quote: considering they already laid out the foundations of the process with their EOS-M. Although I found this particular model not up to competitors

It was much the same as the introduction of the EP1, I`m sure the next EOS-M will be a whole lot better than its first, it was only its focusing speed that hampered it.

What I particularly did not like about it was an almost total touchscreen control. Although funky, it may be a headache in bright light and fast-paced shooting session. Also, I simply can't accept changeable optics cameras with contrast detection autofocus - they look to me much like a DSLR trimmed down for lower production cost purpose.

Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan e2 Member 1315362 forum postsPaul Morgan vcard England6 Constructive Critique Points
12 Jul 2013 - 1:56 AM

Contrast detect autofocus is just fine, some of the fastest focusing camera`s on the planet use contrast detect focusing and have fewer focusing issues.

Steppenwolf
12 Jul 2013 - 9:13 AM


Quote: Yes many companies play tax games across financial boundaries, but I do not think that this is the case here as it is in the total business accounts and it is the sort of information that is giving serious concerns to investors and shareholders. Sadly Panasonic and Sony are fast approaching similar positions that Kodak did. Big well respected player, good name in the public eye, but not generating enough cash to support the level of investment they are making. Sadly one, or even both of them could be gone in 5 years. Both have cash flow problems and need to take serious action to stay in business, that is more than just a downturn in the market.

I think Canikon are doing better because they are avoiding getting drawn into the competing in a price war at the lower value end and also are achieving higher sales for their more value products, i.e I think they make more profit at all points of the market they work at.

As for sales, being the early days you would expect sales to be higher, they are at the opening of the market, that sales have not hit high levels is a concern as a large % of the early adopters who will buy the cameras at the higher margin have already bought the product. the electronics industry is typically showing fast early sales then it levels out till the margins fall to a commodity type level and then sales rise, but at a lower margin. So I am thinking the sales of mirror less cameras are very low given the time they have been in the market.

Looking at what Canon have done with the 70D it would not be a surprise to see an entry level camera using the same sensor but with no mirror and an EVF. That would allow them to recoup much of the technology cost across a number of cameras, helping to cut the impact of R&D costs on profit.

I'm not sure that you'd expect sales to be "higher at the opening of the market". It depends - some things start slowly and build, others take off immediately but then decline. The thing that I've noticed is that the people who are buying CSCs - and it's mainly m4/3 - are generally people who are pretty experienced and already have DSLRs. The newbies who want a first "serious" camera still think that they should get a DSLR, even if they can't explain why. It's going to take time to change that perception.

As for Canikon not getting drawn into the price war have you looked at the prices/cashbacks that Nikon has been offering recently on their volume cameras? It looks very much like they're making a big effort to get more people into their system. I don't follow Canon, but they're probably doing the same.

You're dreaming if you think Sony are going away. Their camera division is not very profitable because they've spent a fortune on new products - a whole new Alpha lens range (which is still growing), a new range of CSCs/lenses and interchangeable lens video cameras, the new SLT system. They've also invested heavily in sensor technology. Whereas Nikon, for example, buy in sensors and have stuck with their traditional SLRs and mainly legacy lens range. Their CSC looks to be designed to not compete with DSLRs. So Nikon is at a company cycle that you'd expect to be more profitable than Sony. I'm not sure who the next domino to fall will be, but it's not Sony - It's probably Pentax.

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