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My Generation

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ade_mcfade
ade_mcfade e2 Member 1014838 forum postsade_mcfade vcard England216 Constructive Critique Points
23 Dec 2012 - 2:06 PM

Beer was just under 1 when i started - 86p in the Station, Clitheroe... think it was around 1 - 1:30 when I was a student in Manchester in 1991. You could knock a fair bit back for a fiver - usually Boddie's - at 3.8% you'd not get wasted too fast.... so we brewed home brew at 7% or more Wink

Probably is a lot harder for this next generation... first off, kids can never "play out" any more because all adults are now paedophiles. They have to pay through the nose to get a degree - uni was once a meritocracy, based on hard A-Levels, it's now based on you ability to pay (albeit paying after you leave....). Whilst paying off their student loans, they'll struggle to get the large deposits for their homes..... I paid 5% on my house! Then there's getting insured on a car - they're looking at 2000+ at first....

not cheap Sad

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thewilliam
23 Dec 2012 - 2:41 PM

When I started drinking, a pint of bitter cost 1/8 or 12 pints to the pound. One hour's work on a basic wage would have bought 3 pints of bitter and a new mini cost about 400.

brrttpaul
brrttpaul  3203 forum posts United Kingdom
23 Dec 2012 - 6:33 PM

Born in 64 so my teens was late 70s early 80s. My early childhood memories are having so much freedom even though i grew up on a huge estate it was different back then, everybody knew each other, everybody worked (hoovers, mining,council) every year the council would reputty and paint the windows and doors etc guttering cleaned out, neighbours would swop veg in the gardens and seeds, even remember taking trout to the butchers and swopping them for meat, great memories. We used to go to the football match and at full time into the clubhouse (jubilee club), the old guys in there used to shout "look out the tiswas gang are here" lol, have a few pints play cards, darts etc, proper mans club, then home bit of food then back out to town (Merthyr) allways end up in tiffanys, there was fighting but but it was fists never bottles or glass or knives, and it usually ended pretty quick with the bouncers. Would I swop my childhood for now??? you got to be joking me lol

JJGEE
JJGEE  96319 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
23 Dec 2012 - 6:41 PM

The Salvation Army band marched around the streets at this time of year playing / singing Christmas Carols. Smile

cats_123
cats_123 e2 Member 104025 forum postscats_123 vcard Northern Ireland25 Constructive Critique Points
23 Dec 2012 - 7:24 PM

Now 61, I was 15 when my scoutmaster bought me 1/2 a shandy after my first club hockey game...my mom went bananas and tore the scoutmaster off a strip!!! Today I see 13/14 yr olds blind drunk on cheap booze...

drugs...never...had enough stimulation without the need for anything else

I too carried a sheath knife..we used to play games throwing them as near to each others feet as possible...never once did I think of it as an offensive weapon.

capto
capto e2 Member 21180 forum postscapto vcard United Kingdom6 Constructive Critique Points
23 Dec 2012 - 11:28 PM

I was born in WW2 and lived through hard and difficult times. BUT, my generation always had one thing that todays youngsters have had taken away----Hope. Today must be one of the worst of times to be young. In my opinion the vast majority of todays youngster are great, only the small mindless minority get all the publicity. Young people are being badly let down by society.

ivor

Nick_w
Nick_w e2 Member 73886 forum postsNick_w vcard England99 Constructive Critique Points
24 Dec 2012 - 8:04 AM

This generation is no different from any other. They push the boundaries when they get to their teens, as they always have and always will, and I for one wouldn't have it any other way, it's how young people develop their own persona, and make their mark on this world.

Those spouting "it was never like this when I was young" have forgotten what they were like when they were 15. You've turned into that grumpy old so and so, that was your father / grandfather.

digicammad
digicammad  1121988 forum posts United Kingdom37 Constructive Critique Points
24 Dec 2012 - 8:35 AM


Quote: I would say young people now have a much easier time, although they probably don't know it.

I can't agree with that. Real unemployment is almost at the record highs of the 80s, employers want a degree for even the most menial of jobs and getting one lands the student in debt before they even start work. Pay isn't keeping up with inflation, renting or buying a house is phenomenally expensive so more are staying at home with their parents. Thanks to media hype parents are too afraid of kidnappers and paedophiles to allow their children to play in the street and every teenager is painted as a hooded thug just waiting for the excuse to knife you.

I seriously doubt that the percentage of today's youngsters who are 'baduns' is any higher than when I was young. Most of the knifings and shootings in the news are between rival drug gangs and that is quite possibly the biggest difference, gangs used to knife and glass each other but there weren't as many guns around.

Another way in which this generation are worse off is that they are likely to have to work longer and end up with little or no state pension. I think in the next 30-40 years we are going to see a massive upturn in poverty amongst retirees.

oldblokeh
oldblokeh  3825 forum posts United Kingdom
24 Dec 2012 - 8:40 AM


Quote: This generation is no different from any other. They push the boundaries when they get to their teens, as they always have and always will, and I for one wouldn't have it any other way, it's how young people develop their own persona, and make their mark on this world.

Those spouting "it was never like this when I was young" have forgotten what they were like when they were 15. You've turned into that grumpy old so and so, that was your father / grandfather.

"Our youth now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for
authority; they show disrespect for their elders, and love chatter in
places of exercise. They no longer rise when elders enter the room.
They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up their
food and tyrannize their teachers." -- Socrates, 44BC

JJGEE
JJGEE  96319 forum posts England18 Constructive Critique Points
24 Dec 2012 - 1:41 PM

Perhaps slightly off track a little but it was part of my generation whilst at University.

I subscribed, with a special student rate, to Newsweek.

It is, I suppose, the sign of the current generation that the digital version replaces the printed one. Sad

keith selmes
24 Dec 2012 - 2:48 PM


Quote: I would say young people now have a much easier time, although they probably don't know it.



Quote: I can't agree with that

My perspective on this is that changes in technology, health care, legislation etc. have made life easier and safer and more comfortable for most people in the developed countries. Young people aren't aware, partly because they grew up with the current lifestyle, but also because they have the problem of paying for it. They're probably more aware of the problems than the advantages, especially in an economic down phase.

p12owe
p12owe  1101 forum posts United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
24 Dec 2012 - 3:23 PM

I can't see that it is better or worse for kids nowadays, just different.

I think the biggest change since I was young is in individual responsibility.

We have become a society of petty rules, and media and commercial propaganda. We are dictated to in every aspect of life being told just what we should say, do and think. Through this, many now seem have lost any sense of self-responsibility for their own lives.

Oh dear... I think I've turned into Victor Meldrew!

monkeygrip
28 Dec 2012 - 4:05 AM

Well I have just got home from one hell of a night on the lash.

You have won the lottery of life being born or living in this country if you think the CEO of any bank gets paid too much then stop moaning and work hard to become the CEO of a bank.

Britain is broken because politicians are failed business men/women and we trust them with the biggest business of all our country.

The kids of today are far more switched on than any era before them yet are the least trusted but if they don't fight for themselves then they don't deserve a chance "grow a backbone"

The definition of poverty is now wether you have a 48" plasma and sky tv.

And young people of today have no respect because they have no role models disapline is a thing of the past. I don't mean abuse but a crack round the ear has kept this country in check for hundreds of years.

Hahaha provocative rant over Tongue

p12owe
p12owe  1101 forum posts United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
28 Dec 2012 - 5:18 AM


Quote:
You have won the lottery of life being born or living in this country if you think the CEO of any bank gets paid too much then stop moaning and work hard to become the CEO of a bank.

The kids of today are far more switched on than any era before them yet are the least trusted but if they don't fight for themselves then they don't deserve a chance "grow a backbone"

The definition of poverty is now whether you have a 48" plasma and sky tv.


Actually, you have won the lottery of life if you are the CEO of a bank, Jobs like that are for the privileged in this country and most of them are not only failed businessmen, but also failed politicians. No amount of hard work will get you the job!

In my experience, kids might be "switched on technically, but in terms of life skills they are really lacking. They don't grow a backbone because they are too used to someone else taking on all their problems for them and telling them what to do.

Oh and the definition of poverty is not the housing association generation with their 48 inch plasma (and forty eight children to pay for it), its the countless thousands of hard workers on low or even minimum wage, paying more and more taxes and working longer and longer hours to pay for all of the above!

Anyway just off to work..... There, I can rant too! Tongue

collywobles
28 Dec 2012 - 7:31 AM


Quote: You have won the lottery of life being born or living in this country if you think the CEO of any bank gets paid too much then stop moaning and work hard to become the CEO of a bank.

My sentiments entirely!

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