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Naughty PC World :(


Freila 4 107
12 Jan 2011 1:16PM

Quote:Exactly the same but the student version doesn't work until after 11am.
Smile

LOL very good Boyd

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Mayfly 9 485 2 United Kingdom
12 Jan 2011 1:53PM

Quote:The Student version is exactly the same, just a cheaper licence. The benefit of this to the supplier is that it gets people into the system and more likely to upgrade when they leave academia



This is true as far as the program is concerned, nothing is ommited from CS5 student licence (like elements is a stripped down version of CS)

One thing to note about the student licence is that it does not allow you to upgrade to a newer release. You would have to re-purchase the new version.

Also you are not licenced to use the student software for any commercial purpose, so you may be on dodgy ground should you sell any work that was processed with the student edition...
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
12 Jan 2011 3:31PM

Quote:...
...which is of course illegal, as you are avoiding paying VAT....



That's a very interesting point.

Many software companies in the USA allow purchasers to buy downloads, priced in US$, irrespective of the location of the purchaser. No VAT charged to UK buyers.

But neither Adobe nor Amazon do that. Although you can download Adobe stuff from their US site no problem, if you try to pay for it, they will transfer you to their UK site and charge you in s with VAT included.

The method I used did involve buying from Amazon in US with delivery to a US address. I can see that HMRC might want to charge VAT if the package is subsequently shipped to UK. But would that apply if all that was "shipped" to UK was an e-mail with the registration key?

And to take it a stage further, if I take my laptop on a visit to US and, while there, download and pay for a software package, am I liable for VAT on my return to UK even although all I am importing, physically, is some code on the hard disc of my laptop?

It would be largely academic if the only price difference between US and UK was the VAT which, of course, none of us object to paying Sad but what really riles me is the totally cynical and exploitive way that the base price in UK is inevitably set far higher than in US. With Adobe software it is pretty well a conversion rate of $1 = 1.
Jestertheclown 6 6.8k 245 England
12 Jan 2011 3:59PM

Quote:...which is of course illegal, as you are avoiding paying VAT....

. . . which all of us, if we're honest and knew we could get away with it, would happily do.

This reminds me of a thread on here a while ago in which a member was going to visit his brother (or someone) in the USA and was planning to buy an Olympus PEN out there and carry it back in his pocket, thus depriving the HM Customs of a few quid in VAT.
I, and quite a few others thought it was quite a normal way of doing business but there was the sound of pitchforks being sharpened and torches being lit in some quarters on here!

Jester.
User_Removed 5 4.6k 1 Scotland
12 Jan 2011 4:06PM
....although, with cameras, Jester, you often find that US Sales Tax makes them more expensive than they seem. US retail prices are always displayed without tax being added and you get a nasty shock when the assistant rings it up on the till. Actual rate depends on the State.



.....and, if you still want to do it, fly home via Edinburgh airport. They do have a special carousel for passengers whose flights commenced outwith EU.........with a wee notice saying "If you have anything to declare, please use this phone to contact HMRC"!!
Jestertheclown 6 6.8k 245 England
12 Jan 2011 4:15PM
@LeftForum,

I'm sure you're right. If it was as easy as that there would be a thriving black camera market like there is for tobacco.

(Surely no-one pays shop prices for tobaco?)
Draig37 8 248 Wales
13 Jan 2011 1:32AM

Quote:


One thing to note about the student licence is that it does not allow you to upgrade to a newer release. You would have to re-purchase the new version.



Are you sure about this as when I bought my lad CS4, I telephoned Adobe and they said he would be able to upgrade in future.
roxpix 11 2.2k 11 Scotland
13 Jan 2011 11:34AM
Going back a page and perhaps I'm wrong but I though that once the cashier started to record the transaction on the 'till' then the 'invite to buy' has been accepted by the retailer and thats why they should sell at stated price. However if you simply query the price then no transaction is underway
mohikan22 11 2.3k 1 United Kingdom
13 Jan 2011 11:46AM
"once the cashier started to record the transaction on the 'till' then the 'invite to buy' has been accepted by the retailer"

thats how i see it too...
John_Frid 9 514 56 United Kingdom
13 Jan 2011 12:23PM
I think the retailer can decline the offer to purchase right up until the payment has physically been made - i.e. money has changed hands (or card transaction completed). Just starting to enter the transaction is not enough to complete the deal - they have to take your money.
Big Bri 14 15.9k United Kingdom
13 Jan 2011 1:19PM
Come on, if you hand something to a cashier and say "can I have this for 200 quid please" he/she has to scan it in the til to find the actual price. I object to paying over the odds for stuff (my own company does it - I get emails from our US and UK stores and the same product is often cheaper in $$$s than it is in s), but you can't seriously expect retailers to give you 500 quid off just because it had the wrong label on.
cathal 10 492 4 Ireland
13 Jan 2011 3:56PM
I think trading standards have miss advised you here.

Having worked in retail, there are lots of legitimate reasons why a price can vary between the advertised shelf price and the price at the till. There are a number of get out clauses that can be applied.

From my retail experience, we would as a gesture of goodwill honour the price where it was a case of the old price not being removed and replaced with a more up to date price. However, we were under no obligation to do so. Likewise, we would return unopened unwanted items and refund if required, even though retailers have no obligation to do so.

Regarding the $$ / variance... it costs hell of a lot more money to do business in the UK than in the States. Get over it.
Overread 7 4.0k 19 England
13 Jan 2011 4:11PM

Quote:I think the retailer can decline the offer to purchase right up until the payment has physically been made - i.e. money has changed hands (or card transaction completed). Just starting to enter the transaction is not enough to complete the deal - they have to take your money.


I think even after they have taken your money there are some get out clauses for them - at the very least such must be the case with distance selling. I've seen several cases where an online shop has missprinted the price on an item (eg missing out a few 0s on the end). In almost all cases the shop manages to pull out of the deal even after the customer has finished the transaction process.

This of course makes sense - imagine how quick a 5DM2 being sold at 10 would take to get spread all around the net - a shop would very quickly get 1000s of orders that would cripple them were they to honour them all.
roxpix 11 2.2k 11 Scotland
13 Jan 2011 5:15PM

Quote:I think the retailer can decline the offer to purchase right up until the payment has physically been made - i.e. money has changed hands (or card transaction completed). Just starting to enter the transaction is not enough to complete the deal - they have to take your money.


Yup, just checked and your right about money changing hands for contract to be in place
Shop may be breaking another law re misleading pricing etc but it doesnt mean anything to the person hoping to buy at lower price as they can still be declined
mohikan22 11 2.3k 1 United Kingdom
13 Jan 2011 6:57PM
skip the shop and im sure you can find other ways on the internet alltogether nowadays.

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