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    widtink
    widtink  2406 forum posts Scotland2 Constructive Critique Points
    12 Aug 2012 - 10:20 PM

    Hi everyone, can i ask another question about ND filters. I used my Panasonic ND 8 filter for the first time yesterday with fairly good results. I was wondering though can i use the -exposure compensation on the camera say set to -3 EV and then overexpose the image by the same degree to gain even slower shutter speeds or will this just result in a messy image.
    Rod

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    sherlob
    sherlob e2 Member 82312 forum postssherlob vcard United Kingdom125 Constructive Critique Points
    12 Aug 2012 - 10:57 PM

    Eh? If your shooting in Bulb - which I suspect you would be with a ND 8 then the camera's exposure compensation does bugger all.

    Basically your camera's exposure compensation only comes into play for non-bulb exposure settings. E.g. the camera meters a snowy scene at 1/500th sec at f11. As the camera's meter is calibrated for 18% grey this will result in grey looking snow. Hence by dialling in +2 stops of exposure compensation (an effective shutter speed of 1/125th sec) the image is overexposed over the meter's suggested reading by 2 stops to give nice and white snow. You may want to compensate in the other way - e.g. to help retain the subtle tones in a reflected sunset.

    When using bulb the camera is not calculating the exposure time for you - you are. Therefore you could theoretically still add exposure compensation by amending your calculations, but the result will simply be either a darker image for (-) exposure compensation and a brighter image for (+).

    I assume you are using your smallest aperture (highest f number) and lowest ISO settings. If not - modifying these settings will result in lengthening your shutter speed. Remember - ultimately exposure is derived from 3 factors = shutter speed, aperture and ISO (sensor sensitivity).

    I hope this helps, and hasn't blinded you with science...

    Adam

    widtink
    widtink  2406 forum posts Scotland2 Constructive Critique Points
    12 Aug 2012 - 11:09 PM

    Cheers Adam (i think) no not using bulb at the moment but iam using smallest aperture and lowest iso (100) would like to use bulb to get slower speeds but don't know how to calculate exposure !!Sad

    newfocus
    newfocus  8644 forum posts United Kingdom2 Constructive Critique Points
    12 Aug 2012 - 11:52 PM

    If you're in aperture priority and already on the smallest aperture, the first step in taking more control would be to move to manual or bulb, using the same aperture and ISO and the shutter speed which aperture priority mode has calculated for you. After that, just increase the shutter time as much as you like. However, you're likely to just overexpose the shot by doing this, in which case you're into using extra or stronger NDs or simply waiting until it's a bit darker Smile

    I hope that helps.

    widtink
    widtink  2406 forum posts Scotland2 Constructive Critique Points
    13 Aug 2012 - 6:11 PM

    Thanks for that yup i was shooting on quite a bright afternoon so thats an option cant afford a big stopper though !!Sad

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