Login or Join Now

Upload your photos, chat, win prizes and much more

Username:
Password:
Remember Me

Can't Access your Account?

New to ePHOTOzine? Join ePHOTOzine for free!

Like 0

need a few tips

Join Now

Join ePHOTOzine, the friendliest photography community.

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more for free!

brrttpaul
brrttpaul  3203 forum posts United Kingdom
8 Apr 2012 - 10:00 PM

Hi guys and girls, I have been watching some peregrines near by me. Today I managed to take some photos of the fledgling and the parents, trouble is 200mm lens and im a fair distance from them, plus the lighting has not been good and is against dark cliffs. So at the moment I have been in S priority ISO auto max 800, and got exposure comp at +5, shutter speed is set at 1/500. I dont want to up my ISO to 1600 if I can help it as the images are cropped ( like the one i posted today). So would you do anything different or am I on the right lines? as Im going up again tomorrow morning any advice is much appreciated.
Thanks
Paul

Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links 
8 Apr 2012 - 10:00 PM

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

BigRick
BigRick  82085 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
8 Apr 2012 - 10:46 PM

spot exposure, and i would shoot in A with auto ISO, as i would want it to stay letting in as much light as possible, and the shutter speed will then work itself out, or you could always shoot in manual, and set your shutter and your aperture, and pull it out later in PS.... but i wouldn't.Smile

of course, you could always try and get a little closer. Smile Wink

brrttpaul
brrttpaul  3203 forum posts United Kingdom
8 Apr 2012 - 11:07 PM

well i was thinking about shooting in A but these birds are lightening fast hence why i went for shutter speed, otherwise all im going to get is a blur

BigRick
BigRick  82085 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
8 Apr 2012 - 11:13 PM

fair point, as i guess that in S the aperture will always be wide open as it will always want the most light it can get anyway.

BigRick
BigRick  82085 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
8 Apr 2012 - 11:17 PM

hi, just looked at the lens you are using and it stops at f5.6 when at full zoom, so will obviously affect your shutter speed vs light available quite alot.... all you can do is keep shooting and try to track the birds with the C focus mode (i dont know if the D3100 has that?) but you may loose the wings in blur unless you get it just right.... hopefully someone else that is more of a bird shooter will come along with some other tips too. Smile

brrttpaul
brrttpaul  3203 forum posts United Kingdom
8 Apr 2012 - 11:17 PM

been browsing all the birds in flight, 90% of them are taken with a 400mm lens, think thats my main problem lol, On the plus side I should be having a 300mm lens by next month but thats as far as my budget will stretch.

BigRick
BigRick  82085 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
8 Apr 2012 - 11:28 PM

there is a guy at work that does nothing but bird photos, and he got the 100-400 canon lens, and still thinks it is too short, so is getting either the 2x converter..... or, and i think he will get it, the Canon 800mm prime.... which is WAY too much money, lol Smile

I tried a 70-200 with a 2x on it which made it a 140-400 and still didnt think it got me close enough really.... a 600mm would be the way to go maybe then with a 1.4x on it.

Budget is everything when it comes to far away things.... but as i say, you can always (nearly always) get closer, with some realtree clothing, or a hide before light.

brrttpaul
brrttpaul  3203 forum posts United Kingdom
8 Apr 2012 - 11:35 PM

will look into it more, cant get too close its not a question of camoflague in this case its safety as its a disused quarry

robthecamman
8 Apr 2012 - 11:38 PM

you could try find some type of bait to draw them closer to you,tho iv not tried to do as your doing just a thought

dcash29
dcash29  81904 forum posts England
8 Apr 2012 - 11:39 PM

I wouldnt put a 2x converter on a 5.6 lens for shooting birds

BigRick
BigRick  82085 forum posts United Kingdom3 Constructive Critique Points
8 Apr 2012 - 11:50 PM


Quote: I wouldnt put a 2x converter on a 5.6 lens for shooting birds

neither would i, you would loose all autofocus and metering.... Tongue

dcash29
dcash29  81904 forum posts England
8 Apr 2012 - 11:54 PM


Quote: neither would i, you would loose all autofocus and metering....

But a guy at your works that shoots nothing but birds is doing???


ahhhh im assuming its a Canon

Last Modified By dcash29 at 8 Apr 2012 - 11:56 PM
meercat
meercat  5278 forum posts United Kingdom
9 Apr 2012 - 5:32 AM

With bird photography the longer the lens the better. I shoot with a 400 prime (only the 5.6 but still) and it sometimes isn't enough. Using a 1.4 converter (Kenko) works ok, you lose a stop or two of light but with taped pins auto focus still works (metering works either way).

I would Not think you can "bait" a peregrine (or a kestrel, which is in the photograph you uploaded today) as they take live food, the best bet to get closer is with fieldcraft and camo gear. But as this bird is on the nest, you would have to be careful NOT to distub it as there would be legal ramifications (not sure you would be allowed to photograph it on the nest at all without a licence, I can't rememebr which birds of prey count as endangered, certinly a peregrine would be a no no, but a kestrel may be OK, worth checking those things out).

brrttpaul
brrttpaul  3203 forum posts United Kingdom
9 Apr 2012 - 8:45 AM

why do you keep saying its a kestrel its a fledgling peregrine, yes it does have the brown bars but these will go as it gets older, the wings are different the tail is different its a peregrine lol. I will be the first too admit I know nothing about photography, but field craft is a different matter, I do know quite a bit (not bear grissls league but a bit). These peregrines have been nesting in the same spot for the last 30yrs that I know, every year I walk up there and watch them, this is the main reason I took up photography to try and capture some of the things I see when Im out. I suggest you look at some images of young peregrines and kestrels to compare the two then you will realise your mistake.

brrttpaul
brrttpaul  3203 forum posts United Kingdom
9 Apr 2012 - 9:24 AM

this is really bugging me now, just had a look at several images again and again and I,m stumped TBH. its thrown me as from a distance i first thought kestrel but then seeing the parents drop a rabbit to it and the 3 of them flying together, im stumped really stumped, I watched this bird eat the rabbit and all three sitting on a ledge, I have pics on facebook but they are quite fuzzy if anyone wants a look, can peregrines adopt???? pmsl

Add a Comment

You must be a member to leave a comment

Username:
Password:
Remember me:
Un-tick this box if you want to login each time you visit.