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Nick-on or Nye-kon?


5 Sep 2011 10:10PM
Aluminium, router, and one I personally hate 'leisure'.
I lived in the states for 25 years and still hate these.

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Photogeek 9 605 6 Wales
5 Sep 2011 10:47PM
ris O toe TongueTongueTongue
redhed17 9 666 England
6 Sep 2011 3:52AM

Quote:Humphrey Davy, the (British) discoverer of the element, originally named it alumium before settling on aluminum. It was only later that objecters effectively forced through a change to aluminium. The American spelling, therefore, has a precedent.


Thanks for that Oldblokeh.

Doesn't make it right though does it? Wink Grin

What about Jagwah Sad
One I do like though is 'gotten'. I think it's a perfect word when used in a suitable context.

When it comes to 'hates' can I mention people who use the word 'brought' when they mean ''bought'? (as in, I just brought a new lens).. aaaargh. Or those who pronounce the letter 'h' as 'Haitch'.
chris.maddock 13 3.4k United Kingdom
6 Sep 2011 8:29AM

Quote: router,


As in network device or woodworking machine? What's wrong with it - for either application?


Quote:and one I personally hate 'leisure'.


Can't see what's wrong with that either, unless it's the context in which it's used?
thewilliam 6 4.7k
6 Sep 2011 11:12AM
In many cases, American usage is just archaic English. We used to speak like that 200 years ago, but the two languages have diverged.

In a few more centuries will American be as different from English as it is from German or Danish?
dlegros 12 217 England
6 Sep 2011 11:57AM

Quote:In many cases, American usage is just archaic English. We used to speak like that 200 years ago, but the two languages have diverged.

In a few more centuries will American be as different from English as it is from German or Danish?



There's a great deal about this in "Mother Tongue" by Bill Bryson - it's a great read for anyone interested in language
User_Removed 4 4.6k 1 Scotland
6 Sep 2011 12:21PM

Quote:router,

As in network device or woodworking machine? What's wrong with it - for either application?

and one I personally hate 'leisure'.

Can't see what's wrong with that either, unless it's the context in which it's used?



I think the problem in both cases is the Yank pronunciation rather than the spelling.

In UK the router in the network is pronounced "root-er" while the woodworking tool is pronounced "Rout-er" and leisure is pronounced "Lez-joor" rather than the American "leez-jur".


Such fun!
chris.maddock 13 3.4k United Kingdom
6 Sep 2011 4:18PM

Quote:router,

As in network device or woodworking machine? What's wrong with it - for either application?

and one I personally hate 'leisure'.

Can't see what's wrong with that either, unless it's the context in which it's used?

I think the problem in both cases is the Yank pronunciation rather than the spelling.

In UK the router in the network is pronounced "root-er" while the woodworking tool is pronounced "Rout-er" and leisure is pronounced "Lez-joor" rather than the American "leez-jur".



Aha, completely forgot "leezure" - and me a good H2G2 fan too Sad
User_Removed 4 4.6k 1 Scotland
6 Sep 2011 4:32PM
But what really makes me furious is when those Yanks refer to us UK citizens as "Brits". For some reason that one really grates. But, then, I suppose that those Americans of a confederate persuasion feel much the same about "Yanks"
chris.maddock 13 3.4k United Kingdom
6 Sep 2011 4:56PM

Quote:But what really makes me furious is when those Yanks refer to us UK citizens as "Brits".


Not a problem really, I just refer to them as Merkins WinkWink
keith selmes 11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
6 Sep 2011 5:21PM

Quote:Americans of a confederate persuasion feel much the same about "Yanks"
I understand from some people in the southern states, the correct term is not "Yanks" but "damnyanks", or possibly "damnyankees", and no, it does not apply to them.

(I don't mind "Brits", never bothered me)
keith selmes 11 7.1k 1 United Kingdom
6 Sep 2011 5:22PM

Quote:In a few more centuries will American be as different from English as it is from German or Danish?
we'll all be speaking chinese a lot sooner'n that Wink
saltireblue e2
4 4.1k 26 Norway
6 Sep 2011 6:55PM
The Honda Jazz, was originally named the Fitta, but that is the Norwegian / Swedish word for the four letter word beginning with c which is obscene slang for the female genitals.
redhed17 9 666 England
6 Sep 2011 9:00PM

Quote:In a few more centuries will American be as different from English as it is from German or Danish?we'll all be speaking chinese a lot sooner'n that Wink


I think it may be Chinese English, (Chinglish?) with all the mispronunciations and slang they bring to the game. Wink More Chinese speak English that there are English (or British) people, it's bound to have an effect.

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