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Nick-on or Nye-kon?

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DouglasMorley
8 Sep 2011 - 11:04 PM

Wherever you go in the world and whatever language you speak long vowels are hardly ever used. The English changed that to small degree but the Americans, and their poor cousins, the Canadians really took over the long vowels with a vengeance.

I take the attitude that one must respect the originators of spoken words as much as possible but it can be very frustrating listening to American commentators especially on travel programs and the way that they abuse European names. I realise that some can be difficult but there's no harm in trying, "van Gogh" is the prime example where Americans have completely given up and opted for their own invention. It can be very amusing to listen to a yank trying to pronounce "Hercule Poirot" "Coelins" and "Baysils" are particularly pretentious names.

Another classic for me is "baroque" which ends up as virtually "broke" and the city of Dubrovnic being "Dubrove-nic"

A Canadian friend of mine, and Nikon owner who knows how to pronounce Nikon correctly was complimented by a Japanese Nikon rep. who told him that it was really nice to hear his company's name spoken correctly.

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JohnParminter

I once worked an American who was telling me about the wonderful time he had had whilst visiting E-din-burg. I listened intently for what seemed ages trying to work out which German or European city he was talking about until he mentioned tartan, it then dawned on me that he was in Edinburgh....

How silly of me..

Mind, I'm Cumbrian and there are some locals I can't understand or places which are hard to correctly pronounce.

Try pronouncing this wee village

Torpenhow

Smile

RogBrown
RogBrown  72997 forum posts England10 Constructive Critique Points
9 Sep 2011 - 4:17 PM

My son once had an American stop him in the street & ask for directions to "Loogerbooger". Turned out he wanted Loughborough. Smile

chris.maddock
9 Sep 2011 - 4:23 PM


Quote: Mind, I'm Cumbrian and there are some locals I can't understand or places which are hard to correctly pronounce.
Try pronouncing this wee village
Torpenhow


I looked it up on Wiki, not to get the pronunciation, but it's supposedly on there - and I'm still not going to try Tongue
The reason I looked was because the name sounded familiar - being composed of three names for a hill.

Last Modified By chris.maddock at 9 Sep 2011 - 4:26 PM
JohnParminter
11 Sep 2011 - 2:50 PM


Quote: Mind, I'm Cumbrian and there are some locals I can't understand or places which are hard to correctly pronounce.
Try pronouncing this wee village
Torpenhow


I looked it up on Wiki, not to get the pronunciation, but it's supposedly on there - and I'm still not going to try Tongue
The reason I looked was because the name sounded familiar - being composed of three names for a hill.

Indeed Chris, three names for a hill, it is pronounced Trapenna and Aspatria is pronounce a-spatri...!!

User_Removed
17 Sep 2011 - 9:56 AM


Quote: I once worked an American who was telling me about the wonderful time he had had whilst visiting E-din-burg. I listened intently for what seemed ages trying to work out which German or European city he was talking about until he mentioned tartan, it then dawned on me that he was in Edinburgh....

How silly of me..

That would be the same American I met in Princes Street in Edinburgh. He pointed up at the castle and said, "Gee, that's impressive. Just a pity they built it so close to the railway!"

.

thatmanbrian
18 Sep 2011 - 12:12 PM

Just caught up with this and thought I'd add in a controversy I started in MicroMart magazine about how to pronounce the computer operating system Linux. I've heard a lot of people say Linn-ux whereas I've always said Lie-nux. Many pointed out that the inventor of Linux, Linus Torval pronounced it Linn-ux, so I said the French call their capital "Par-ee" but we don't!!

Brian

User_Removed
18 Sep 2011 - 1:59 PM

More to the point, Brian, how did Linus Torval pronounce his name? In fact, how did he pronounce both his names?

I must confess I have always pronounced Linux as Linn-ux but if I met Mr Torval I would probably address him as Lye-us. (Just because both the Linusses that I have met pronounced their names that way.)

mrcal
mrcal  101032 forum posts
18 Sep 2011 - 2:06 PM

I have somewhere an audio clip (sad, I know) of him doing the pronunciation - Leenuss and Leenux

You can probably find of the web.

digiman57
digiman57  3 United Kingdom
22 Sep 2011 - 7:53 PM

Ummm, if Nikon's lenses are spelt Nikkor and sound like Nickor, then surely, with one 'K', Nikon should be pronounced Nye-kon??

There is a small village near me called Cowbit...but it's pronounced Cubbit , and Leicester is another good one GrinGrin

Martin

thatmanbrian
22 Sep 2011 - 8:08 PM

I agree - in English grammar if a vowel is followed by a single consonant as in Linux then the 'i' is 'eye' but if there were two 'n's the i would be 'y' But being English there are always exceptions!

Ewanneil
Ewanneil  41118 forum posts Scotland2 Constructive Critique Points
22 Sep 2011 - 9:10 PM

My wife has just asked me, "what's everyone writing about on that photo website tonight then?"

"Well there's a bit of a debate about how you pronounce Nikon - is it Nye-kon or Nick-on", I said.

To which she replied, "Who says Nye-kon?"

"Americans, apparently", said I.

"Well tell them to f*ck-off" she said.

She has a way with words.Wink

Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
User_Removed
23 Sep 2011 - 8:34 AM


Quote: My wife has just asked me, "what's everyone writing about on that photo website tonight then?"

"Well there's a bit of a debate about how you pronounce Nikon - is it Nye-kon or Nick-on", I said.

To which she replied, "Who says Nye-kon?"

"Americans, apparently", said I.

"Well tell them to f*ck-off" she said.

She has a way with words.Wink

A pragmatic solution to the world's problems!

keithh
keithh  1022760 forum posts Wallis and Futuna29 Constructive Critique Points
23 Sep 2011 - 9:59 AM

Nikon are Japanese, so therefore it's Neekon

thatmanbrian
23 Sep 2011 - 10:28 AM

You're not Japanases though are you Keith? Parisians say Par-ie we say Paris. Sorted.Tongue

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