Login or Join Now

Upload your photos, chat, win prizes and much more

Username:
Password:
Remember Me

Can't Access your Account?

New to ePHOTOzine? Join ePHOTOzine for free!

Like 0

Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8

Join Now

Join ePHOTOzine, the friendliest photography community.

Upload photos, chat with photographers, win prizes and much more for free!

FatBoyfocus
30 Dec 2012 - 9:41 AM

Hi

Some advice please.
I currently have a D3100 but, will be upgrading in the new year. I want to buy this lens or something similar.
I don't know much about sensors and lens fitting etc.

I'm looking for something I can use on the d3100 now and later on the transfer it to the new camera without causing me any issues. I'm not sure yet what I'll be buying but, I was looking at the D3, D600, D800... aiming for the upper categories. I'll know at the time but, I'm assuming going up a few will have bigger sensors???

Any advice will be handy including suggesting a camera or flash
I do small work events (Functions and presentations), some student photography (Portraits and street photography) and have a few friends weddings coming up.
All these people asked me as a friend and I have been doing these for nothing or travel cost only. I'd like to be able to do more with a faster camera/lens on low light etc (Especially for the weddings inside)

Thanks in advance
Riaan

Sponsored Links
Sponsored Links 
30 Dec 2012 - 9:41 AM

Join ePHOTOzine for free and remove these adverts.

M22s
M22s  236 forum posts1 Constructive Critique Points
30 Dec 2012 - 10:04 AM

The 24-70 is right up there with Nikons best! If you type the following into google, all your questions will be answered - 'nikon 24-70 f2.8 review', then post any questions you are left with on here. I wouldn't worry about making the purchase, but i think you need to do a little further research of your own regarding the camera choices you have cited, again google will help.

But to be constructive, the 24-70 with any of the 3 cameras will be a superb combination, and one used by pros all over.

Last Modified By M22s at 31 Dec 2012 - 10:25 AM Helpful Post! This post was flagged as helpful
Focus_Man
Focus_Man  4481 forum posts United Kingdom631 Constructive Critique Points
30 Dec 2012 - 10:15 AM

It always amazes me how people do professional work but need to ask for such basic advice. Get an idea of what you want like an f2.8 lens (constant full aperture that is) then google reviews.

FatBoyfocus
30 Dec 2012 - 10:23 AM

Hi

Thanks I'll try that and be back if I get confused

Thanks

Focus_Man... I did mention it's for friends and work mates... never was pro work and wasn't planning on going that way
It's a hobby I take pride in. Just because I don't know about the ins and outs of camera's, doesn't mean I'm any worst than you??? Tongue

Last Modified By FatBoyfocus at 30 Dec 2012 - 10:31 AM
Focus_Man
Focus_Man  4481 forum posts United Kingdom631 Constructive Critique Points
30 Dec 2012 - 10:38 AM


Quote: I do small work events (Functions and presentations), some student photography (Portraits and street photography) and have a few friends weddings coming up.
All these people asked me as a friend and I have been doing these for nothing or travel cost only. I'd like to be able to do more with a faster camera/lens on low light etc (Especially for the weddings inside)
Thanks in advance
Riaan

Still professional work whether or not you receive remuneration. I never said you were "any worst than me" just trying to make what I believe is a valid point. I apologise if I have caused offence.

User_Removed
30 Dec 2012 - 10:39 AM


Quote: It always amazes me how people do professional work but need to ask for such basic advice.

I thought the OP made it perfectly clear that he was an amateur with an entry-level camera who was looking to "up his game". Let's hope this genuine request for advice does not turn into one of those odious threads where "professional" photographers whinge and moan about amateurs "stealing" their work.

So, looking at his basic question, the Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 is probably the best "standard zoom" for use with any of Nikon's FX-format dSLR cameras. Most of us who moved from DX to FX swapped our old 17-55mm f/2.8 lenses for this FX model and were not disappointed with the results. So - if you are seriously considering moving to an FX body, and you can afford this lens, it is undoubtedly the one to go for.

It is the middle range component of the standard Nikon FX f/2.8 trio - the 14-24mm, the 24-70mm and the 70-200mm, each of which is amongst the very best high-quality zoom lenses on the market.

FatBoyfocus
30 Dec 2012 - 10:56 AM

Hi

Thanks for the help. Looks like this will be a good choice Grin

Focus_Man
Focus_Man  4481 forum posts United Kingdom631 Constructive Critique Points
30 Dec 2012 - 11:03 AM


Quote: Let's hope this genuine request for advice does not turn into one of those odious threads where "professional" photographers whinge and moan about amateurs "stealing" their work.

Not my intention, I am 72 and well retired. The work he mentions that he does, is Professional work whether or not remuneration is received.

thewilliam
30 Dec 2012 - 11:10 AM

Nikon has always made sure that the lenses intended to become a professional's standard kit are of the highest quality and performance. The 24-70 is one of those lenses.

widtink
widtink  2406 forum posts Scotland2 Constructive Critique Points
30 Dec 2012 - 2:31 PM

enough said

Last Modified By Moderator Team at 3 Jan 2013 - 12:10 PM
hobbs
hobbs e2 Member 101222 forum postshobbs vcard United Kingdom
30 Dec 2012 - 11:41 PM

It's a cracking lens, that you can't go wrong with. I'm due to go FX at some point next year and it's at the top of my purchase list.

LenShepherd
LenShepherd e2 Member 62426 forum postsLenShepherd vcard United Kingdom
31 Dec 2012 - 8:07 AM


Quote: Hi

I don't know much about sensors and lens fitting etc.


The straightforward comment is that the 24-70 works perfectly with every Nikon DSLR.
Finding out more about Nikon equipment is not too difficult by visiting Nikon's website and maybe ordering brochures. As you appear to be a UK based visiting your nearest Jessop's shop is another option.
The lens you are considering costs about four times more than your current camera with kit lens. Whether it might be best value as a first buy for someone intending to enter the wedding arena is another topic.
To get the best out of the 24-70 ideally needs pro grade body and appropriate flash and a total budget of around 3000.
Something like a D5200 with 18-105 costs less than 1000, a D7000 with 24-120 f4 costs about 1500, and a D600 with 24-85 costs under 2000. Each of these options has more resolution, better high ISO performance and better autofocus than your present camera with the kit lens, with the improvement roughly proportional to the price difference.

thewilliam
31 Dec 2012 - 10:52 AM

Good lenses can remain in use for a decade or even longer, whereas camera bodies come and go. The best of the Nikon lenses from 20 or 30 years ago are still pretty good by today's standards but who would want to use a D1 body?

An investment in good lenses is truly an investment.

I must disagree with Len and say that the image-quality of the cheaper Nikon bodies is very close to that of the high-end models from the same generation so that, unless you're shooting in extreme conditions, you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference in the results.

That said, some of the real cheapie Nikon lenses, like the 18-55, are seriously good when straight from the box. What they lack is the durability of the higher-end optics and the deterioration of image-quality with age is gradual and insidious.

I have a 24-70 and rate it very highly indeed. It has the durability needed for a press lens, so the OP is unlikely to wear it out.

She-who-must-be-obeyed uses DX format for her "bump" shoots and borrows the 24-70 on a frequent basis. That means it must be good!

User_Removed
31 Dec 2012 - 1:08 PM

If you're looking for a cheaper option but with the same optical quality, may I suggest a secondhand Nikkor 28 - 70mm f2.8? It's the route I went about 4 years ago and haven't regretted it. It's one of the two lenses I use everyday for work (the other being the 70-200 f2.8). And I don't miss the extra 4mm. (If I do, I reach for the 14 - 24 f2.8, and that generally means I'm missing more than the 4mm).

FatBoyfocus
31 Dec 2012 - 5:12 PM

loads of good advice here gents. Thank you Grin

I don't mind the lens costing 4 times more than the current camera... I mean to use this later on a much higher spec camera Wink which was the reason for the post... so I could do exactly that Grin

Riaan

Last Modified By FatBoyfocus at 31 Dec 2012 - 5:15 PM

Add a Comment

You must be a member to leave a comment

Username:
Password:
Remember me:
Un-tick this box if you want to login each time you visit.