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Nikon D7000

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TonyBrooks
26 Jun 2013 - 7:42 AM

Good Morning All

I have a Nikon D7000 that does not appear to give very sharp images I have tried different Lenses and a tripod to stabalize more and the only way I can bring in the sharpness is through NX2 sharpening slider as I always shoot in RAW.

Any ideas please

Thankyou & Regards

Tony

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26 Jun 2013 - 7:42 AM

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uzi9mm
uzi9mm  378 forum posts United Kingdom
26 Jun 2013 - 8:32 AM

go to youtube and lookup videos on fine tuning your focus

JohnParminter
26 Jun 2013 - 9:37 AM

Tony, in your camera Picture Control menu, see what sharpness is set to? I think you have a range of 0-9 or similar. By default RAW files are generally set to a soft setting so you can alter the sharpness to your desire in your preferred RAW convertor or editing program.

I have my D300 set to sharpness 9 and this is applied to my RAW files in NX2 so in effect I never see soft or unsharp images, it's just my preference. Experiment to see if this is the issue.

JP

Gundog
Gundog  1624 forum posts Scotland
26 Jun 2013 - 10:05 AM


Quote: ..... and the only way I can bring in the sharpness is through NX2 sharpening slider as I always shoot in RAW.





Tony,

If you are able to achieve good sharpness in NX2, then there is nothing wrong with your camera, your lenses or your technique. NX2 will not achieve satisfactory sharpening if there is anything wrong in the Raw file.

The point is that unprocessed Raw images, straight from the camera, will never look sharp. Post-exposure sharpening will always be required. (Some cameras require more than others - for example, the lack of a hi-pass filter on the D7100 should mean that its Raw files require less sharpening than those of the D7000.)

There is a simple check. Take some shots in Raw + Fine Jpeg and compare them. If the Jpegs are sharp, then the camera is OK.

Last Modified By Gundog at 26 Jun 2013 - 10:06 AM
kodachrome
26 Jun 2013 - 2:03 PM

I think that advice is good, its worth bearing in mind that most Nikon APS-C DX cameras tend to have quite soft out put at factory default, [read some of the reviews], so dial in a bit of sharpening as required.

M22s
M22s  236 forum posts1 Constructive Critique Points
26 Jun 2013 - 5:28 PM


Quote: Tony, in your camera Picture Control menu, see what sharpness is set to? I think you have a range of 0-9 or similar. By default RAW files are generally set to a soft setting so you can alter the sharpness to your desire in your preferred RAW convertor or editing program.

I have my D300 set to sharpness 9 and this is applied to my RAW files in NX2 so in effect I never see soft or unsharp images, it's just my preference. Experiment to see if this is the issue.

JP

Well I didn't know that! Am I correct in thinking from that, shooting RAW through LR this is less important as you do the sharpening in software rather than the cameras software? Or do you get overall sharper images using this alongside sharpening software in post?

Gundog
Gundog  1624 forum posts Scotland
26 Jun 2013 - 6:54 PM


Quote: Tony, in your camera Picture Control menu, see what sharpness is set to? I think you have a range of 0-9 or similar. By default RAW files are generally set to a soft setting so you can alter the sharpness to your desire in your preferred RAW convertor or editing program.

I have my D300 set to sharpness 9 and this is applied to my RAW files in NX2 so in effect I never see soft or unsharp images, it's just my preference. Experiment to see if this is the issue.

JP

Well I didn't know that! Am I correct in thinking from that, shooting RAW through LR this is less important as you do the sharpening in software rather than the cameras software? Or do you get overall sharper images using this alongside sharpening software in post?

If you are using LR (as I do), then the in-camera picture controls have no effect on your Raw files and you start from scratch (or from your own defaults) in LR.

However, the OP uses NX2 and this will pick up the camera settings and apply them in NX2.

Andyphotography

My D7000 was set to +3 sharpening out of the box, I set it to +6.
The D7000 is a bit of a funny beast until it is set up correctly (AF fine tuning etc) and it takes a bit of effort to get the best out of it.

Last Modified By Andyphotography at 26 Jun 2013 - 8:05 PM
Paul65
Paul65  6258 forum posts England
26 Jun 2013 - 8:32 PM


Quote: Tony, in your camera Picture Control menu, see what sharpness is set to? I think you have a range of 0-9 or similar. By default RAW files are generally set to a soft setting so you can alter the sharpness to your desire in your preferred RAW convertor or editing program.

I have my D300 set to sharpness 9 and this is applied to my RAW files in NX2 so in effect I never see soft or unsharp images, it's just my preference. Experiment to see if this is the issue.

JP

Doh question, but talk me through where I can find the menu to make this adjustment. Searched but can't find it???

LenShepherd
LenShepherd e2 Member 62450 forum postsLenShepherd vcard United Kingdom
26 Jun 2013 - 8:59 PM

To Paul first go to Shooting Menu, set picture control and press OK. Then right click the multi selector to bring up extra options. The first of the options is sharpening.
You can also adjust contrast, brightness, saturation and hue in the same place.
To Tony can you post a link to an image of a good AF target. It is possible the camera needs a focus adjustment and that sharpening in RAW is only partly resolving a focus accuracy issue.

Last Modified By LenShepherd at 26 Jun 2013 - 9:00 PM
Paul65
Paul65  6258 forum posts England
26 Jun 2013 - 10:03 PM


Quote: To Paul first go to Shooting Menu, set picture control and press OK. Then right click the multi selector to bring up extra options. The first of the options is sharpening.

Sorted. ThanksGrin

JeffJaskowiak

It is to my understanding that shooting in RAW will always leave you with an un-sharpened image. Setting the sharpness or and other variable such as hue or saturation applies to the JPEG output of the camera either on your memory card or what is rendered in the display on the back of the camera. Raw is the untouched file, therefore needs sharpening and adjustments which can be applied in the conversion software whether it be LR, Bridge, or NX2. There in-lies the beauty of shooting RAW, your camera isn't responsible for adjusting the image but rather you are which give you more control of the final output. That includes creative control or correcting something that didn't go quite right in-camera.

Jestertheclown


Quote: Raw is the untouched file,

I was always under that impression too. However, I tried adjusting the sharpness and saturation (Picture control) settings in my Nikon and took a series of shots of a brightly coloured flower bed in the park.
Upon opening the raws, using Picasa, there's a noticeable difference between them in their saturation.
I'm not sure that I could see an improvement in their sharpness though.
Googling this doesn't throw up a definitive answer either. It would appear that altering these setting will or won't affect the raws, depending upon who you listen to.

Gundog
Gundog  1624 forum posts Scotland
8 Aug 2013 - 7:51 PM


Quote: It is to my understanding that shooting in RAW will always leave you with an un-sharpened image. .

That's not quite right. The problem is the word "unsharpened".

The Raw file contains the image as captured by the sensor.

Because of sensor deficiencies and, more particularly with some cameras, the filters in front of the sensor, the image captured will not be sharp. It does, therefore, require some artificial sharpening in post-exposure processing.

What Raw converters do with Raw images and in-camera settings is another matter. Some software will apply - to greater or lesser extent - the camera settings when the Raw "image" is displayed. With Nikon cameras, Nikon's own software, such as ViewNX2 and Capture NX2, will take account of those camera settings. I don't know about Picasa. I use Lightroom which, like ACR, largely ignores the camera settings and initially displays the image in the Raw form with just a few default presets applied. I prefer that as I can, if I wish, zap the defaults and start from scatch with an unadulterated Raw. But it's horses for courses.

.

Last Modified By Gundog at 8 Aug 2013 - 7:52 PM
Jestertheclown

I always open raws using Lightrom too. I've never bothered with ViewNX2 (or whichever one it is that I've got).
I only used Picasa to look at these particular shots as it displays them, as far as I know, as they come, with no defaults or pre-sets applied, purely so that I could compare them with one another.
In fact I also opened them with FastStone, which enabled me to open all four on one screen.
In both cases, I could see a difference in their saturation.

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