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NIKON D800 Shock


User_Removed 10 17.9k 8 Norway
2 Feb 2013 9:53PM
So.

Chris (sharpepictures) ...

You have been VERY quiet since your original post...

Any comments?

Please.

As a 'Professional' of 15 years..???

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Nick_w e2
7 4.1k 99 England
2 Feb 2013 10:14PM
What the OP is seeing a flaw in his hand holding technique, as the resolution on the D800 is enormous, any slight camera shake will be visable when viewed at 100%, it actually shows how good the camera is. If you look at his website, a number of the images there are not that sharp .

Why doesn't he down sample a couple to say 15mp see if he still can see the camera shake. One solution is to use VR lenses.
Paul Morgan e2
13 16.1k 6 England
2 Feb 2013 10:17PM
Or a faster shutter speed Smile
Nick_w e2
7 4.1k 99 England
2 Feb 2013 10:20PM
Or higher ISO awesome even at ISO6400
dandeakin 7 207 3 England
2 Feb 2013 11:08PM
Or trade his D800 for the D100 offered earlier...
janeez e2
6 1.2k 8 United Kingdom
3 Feb 2013 1:06AM
95.00 each for his images!!!!! (gasp!)
Steppenwolf 3 1.1k
3 Feb 2013 8:22AM

Quote:Why don't you just resize your pictures to what ever you used to use and then your "problem" will go away.




Exactly. It's a wind-up.
thewilliam 6 4.8k
3 Feb 2013 11:01AM
One good friend spent a fortune on a very nice guitar, expecting it to sound great. It just made the faults in his technique so much more obvious and he needed some serious tuition before he was able to get the best from the instrument.

I found much the same thing when I bought my first Hasselblad some 35 years ago.

With a mediocre anything, everybody gets mediocre results. Using the best, a master can do better but the novice can do a lot worse.

We've bought a lot of kit from Grays, so I'm not surprised that they took it back because they're a world-class dealer. I'm just sad that they couldn't persuade the OP to persist and master the D800.
rhol2 e2
3 319 1 United Kingdom
3 Feb 2013 11:33AM
It seems to me that to say the camera needs "2-3 times the normal shutter speed" is a vague statement to say the least.

What is "normal shutter speed" anyway?

As suggested above, it looks as if the OP is simply trying to shoot at inadequate speeds for some subjects.. it's not uncommon for some photographers to like to think they can handhold at lower speeds than they are capable of. Perhaps one get away with it with lower resolution cameras...
3 Feb 2013 11:40AM
I seem to have put rather a lot of noses out of joint with this. From the persistent but defensive attempts to discredit my 'technique' I think that actually I am now talking to the on-line representatives of the Nikon Corporation.
So, now I have your attention, this is a very serious request for you to re-design the D800 to get rid of this technical problem. You cannot continue trying to blame the photographers technique. In terms of a business strategy, this can only be a temporary stop gap excuse, while you sort the problem out. As experience of using your D800 filters through photographers will vote with their wallets.
As I said I have been a loyal Nikon user for 15 years, because I knew Nikon could be trusted to produce first class cameras. If it was only a matter of shooting still pictures then I would definitely be happy to stick to my D3. However as we have now moved into the SLR/Video world, this is no longer sufficient.
Hard working professional freelance photographers such as myself simply cannot afford to be let down by their equipment. So, Nikon..... sort it out asap !!!!!!
thewilliam 6 4.8k
3 Feb 2013 11:57AM
I'm unsure what "technical problem" the OP's D800 is alleged to have. As others have said, the resolution can be wound down to the same level as older Nikons. Did the camera still misbehave?

In the good old days of film, medium-format was generally used on a tripod for exactly the reason that the OP mentions: camera-shake was more obvious than with 35mm. We didn't even dream of hand-holding large format cameras!

Several friends have adopted the D800 for wedding photography but none has mentioned a problem. One supplies 20 inch wide albums on a regular basis so a double-page spread image needs to be 40 inch wide. Unlike framed work, the viewer's eyes are close to the page.
rhol2 e2
3 319 1 United Kingdom
3 Feb 2013 12:06PM
It appears that on this matter, everyone is wrong except for Mr. Sharp!
i.e. the members of this forum, many of whom are experienced Professionals, and the reviewers at this site, DPR ,and elsewhere....
3 Feb 2013 12:07PM

Quote: If you spend 2000 on a D800, you expect it to be a step up from the D3, not a downgrade.


Are these posts more than a wind up?
A professional Nikon user for 15 years normally has Nikon Pro Service and got invited to several D800 hands-on sessions around the time of the product launch.
At these product launches Nikon explained the D800 requires excellent technique to make the best of the high resolution, and that it does not match the D3s or the D4 for high ISO performance, or FPS.
As you imply you visited Greys of Westminster I assume it should have not been difficult for you to attend one of the these launch events, several of which were held in London.
With professional equipment buying decisions there are two primary considerations - can the product do what you want it to do, and if it can how well can it do it?
I can get much more detail in D800 A2 prints than with 12 and 16 MP Nikon bodies but to do so I often need a good tripod, the help of vibration reduction lenses, to take extra steps such as leaning against a wall to control handheld camera shake, or to turn up the ISO which is very good even at 1600 ISO.
For smaller prints my D800 technique needs to be no better than with the D3s or D7000.
Going back into history, like others, I had challenges with K25 because the low ISO and high resolution ideally required either a tripod or electronic flash much more often if hand holding. K25 provided the highest resolution from 35mm format when you started in professional photography 15 years ago - maybe you are new to the challenges of high resolution photography.
I find it surprising a "professional" photographers of 15 years standing does not appreciate making larger prints requires a proportionately higher level of control of camera shake, or does not seem to understand the difference between sensor size and pixel density.
As to your comment on video is not for me to explain why you appear not to get or maybe not to read the Nikon Pro magazine. The current issue tells you at the time of publication Nikon was still the only DSLR to achieve the European Broadcasting Union standard as being suitable for HD broadcast television. In one of the trailers for the BBC Life in Africa series Nikon was clearly being used for video recording the great white sharks feeding sequence. Maybe Nikon are not as far behind in video as you imply Smile
Business people who do not do appropriated research can end up making poor purchases, as you think you did. I am very happy after six months use with my D800 purchase.
3 Feb 2013 12:18PM

Quote:I seem to have put rather a lot of noses out of joint with this. From the persistent but defensive attempts to discredit my 'technique' I think that actually I am now talking to the on-line representatives of the Nikon Corporation.
So, now I have your attention, this is a very serious request for you to re-design the D800 to get rid of this technical problem. You cannot continue trying to blame the photographers technique. In terms of a business strategy, this can only be a temporary stop gap excuse, while you sort the problem out. As experience of using your D800 filters through photographers will vote with their wallets.
As I said I have been a loyal Nikon user for 15 years, because I knew Nikon could be trusted to produce first class cameras. If it was only a matter of shooting still pictures then I would definitely be happy to stick to my D3. However as we have now moved into the SLR/Video world, this is no longer sufficient.
Hard working professional freelance photographers such as myself simply cannot afford to be let down by their equipment. So, Nikon..... sort it out asap !!!!!!



Perhaps you could post a sample image and exif info to show us the technical issue you refer to?
3 Feb 2013 12:20PM
Actually my technical information on this comes from one of your own employees. I was shooting a conference on technology and was approached by a 'Nikon Trainer' who asked me what camera I was using. I showed him my D3, but then told him I had just bought a D800.
He then proceeded to advise me about having to increase the shutter speed 2-3 times to avoid getting blurred images. I immediately asked the question about shooting smaller file sizes to get around this. He told me this would make no difference, as the image would still be recorded by the sensor and then I would just get a reduced size version of this image.

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