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Nikon Shutter Lag

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Newdevonian
14 Nov 2012 - 1:22 PM

Just a thought DX cameras have smaller mirrors and shutter curtains to accelerate, not that it probably makes a blind bit of difference.
Now if you want to experience shutter lag, try photographing leaping dolphins with a Canon S95. I have so many frames of dolphin tails, it's embarrassing.

Last Modified By Newdevonian at 14 Nov 2012 - 1:25 PM
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UKMike2013
14 Nov 2012 - 2:41 PM

At the risk of offending someone, can I say from a scientific point of view, that anyone who feels that shutter lag is responsible for them missing a great sporting shot, is delusional.

You can always check your response using the stopwatch facility on your favourite device - wristwatch/smartphone etc.

Click to start and then click to stop immediately. The best responses will be around 1/5 second.

Now start the stopwatch and try to anticipate the time to stop it bang on 10 seconds. Keep repeating until you get better - or worse - and count the percentage of times you hit bang on 10 seconds. Now think again about your shutter.

UKMike2013
14 Nov 2012 - 2:58 PM


Quote: Thanks for your comment Mike. Do you really mean to say that all modern DSLR's have the ability to work and capture sporting action as long as the operator using them has the ability to anticipate the action.We're not talking here about frame rates of the Gatling gun variety. It's all about that very first response. Somehow I find that hard to believe. I just wouldn't feel that confident of backing a Nikon 3200 up against a Nikon D4 getting that very first frame of the ball right on the head of Wayne Rooney about to put the ball into the back of the net in the final in Rio. Cheers.

Yes that is exactly what I'm saying.

But this assumes we are talking about shutter lag as your original comment. If you are taking focussing into account then its a whole new world dependent on lighting levels, camera, lens etc etc.

mixipix
mixipix  1 Australia
15 Nov 2012 - 1:36 AM

Thanks everyone for your input. The answer to my question has been partly answered by the two links below supplied by Mikehit. How do you manage to lay your hands on this info so quickly???
Please read them, they are most informative. There are issues of shutter lag and they are real, however there are different parameters that can effect it. Thanks all.

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/D2X/D2XA7.HTM
http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/nikon-d600/nikon-d600A6.HTM

LenShepherd
LenShepherd e2 Member 62481 forum postsLenShepherd vcard United Kingdom
15 Nov 2012 - 10:26 AM


Quote:
Please read them, they are most informative.

Can you check the links - I cannot get them to open.

oldblokeh
oldblokeh  3820 forum posts United Kingdom
15 Nov 2012 - 10:42 AM

Len, the links are malformed. I've corrected them for mixpix below.

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/D2X/D2XA7.HTM

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/nikon-d600/nikon-d600A6.HTM

rhol2
rhol2 e2 Member 3299 forum postsrhol2 vcard United Kingdom1 Constructive Critique Points
15 Nov 2012 - 12:15 PM

Fast reactions and good hand/eye co-ordination by the user seem more important to me than tiny differences in measured shutter lag

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